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India U19 WC squad

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India U19 squad for World Cup: Yashasvi Jaiswal (MCA), Tilak Varma (Hyderabad CA), Divyaansh Saxena (MCA), Priyam Garg (Captain) (UPCA), Dhruv Chand Jurel (vice-captain & wicket-keeper) (UPCA), Shashwat Rawat (Baroda CA), Divyansh Joshi (CA Mizoram), Shubhang Hegde (KSCA), Ravi Bishnoi (RCA), Akash Singh (RCA), Kartik Tyagi (UPCA), Atharva Ankolekar (MCA), Kumar Kushagra (wicket-keeper) (JSCA), Sushant Mishra (JSCA), Vidyadhar Patil (KSCA)

 

Ahead of the World Cup, India U19 will travel to South Africa for three one-day matches against South Africa U19 followed by a Quadrangular Series featuring South Africa U19, India U19, Zimbabwe U19 and New Zealand U19.

 

India U19 squad for the tour of South Africa: Yashasvi Jaiswal (MCA), Tilak Varma (Hyderabad CA), Divyaansh Saxena (MCA), Priyam Garg (Captain) (UPCA), Dhruv Chand Jurel (vice-captain & wicket-keeper) (UPCA), Shashwat Rawat (Baroda CA), Divyansh Joshi (CA Mizoram), Shubhang Hegde (KSCA), Ravi Bishnoi (RCA), Akash Singh (RCA), Kartik Tyagi (UPCA), Atharva Ankolekar (MCA), Kumar Kushagra (wicket-keeper) (JSCA), Sushant Mishra (JSCA), Vidyadhar Patil (KSCA), CTL Rakshan (Hyderabad CA)

 

https://www.bcci.tv/articles/2019/news/139375/four-time-champion-india-announce-u19-cricket-world-cup-squad

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13 minutes ago, Mosher said:

 

India U19 squad for World Cup: Yashasvi Jaiswal (MCA), Tilak Varma (Hyderabad CA), Divyaansh Saxena (MCA), Priyam Garg (Captain) (UPCA), Dhruv Chand Jurel (vice-captain & wicket-keeper) (UPCA), Shashwat Rawat (Baroda CA), Divyansh Joshi (CA Mizoram), Shubhang Hegde (KSCA), Ravi Bishnoi (RCA), Akash Singh (RCA), Kartik Tyagi (UPCA), Atharva Ankolekar (MCA), Kumar Kushagra (wicket-keeper) (JSCA), Sushant Mishra (JSCA), Vidyadhar Patil (KSCA)

 

Ahead of the World Cup, India U19 will travel to South Africa for three one-day matches against South Africa U19 followed by a Quadrangular Series featuring South Africa U19, India U19, Zimbabwe U19 and New Zealand U19.

 

India U19 squad for the tour of South Africa: Yashasvi Jaiswal (MCA), Tilak Varma (Hyderabad CA), Divyaansh Saxena (MCA), Priyam Garg (Captain) (UPCA), Dhruv Chand Jurel (vice-captain & wicket-keeper) (UPCA), Shashwat Rawat (Baroda CA), Divyansh Joshi (CA Mizoram), Shubhang Hegde (KSCA), Ravi Bishnoi (RCA), Akash Singh (RCA), Kartik Tyagi (UPCA), Atharva Ankolekar (MCA), Kumar Kushagra (wicket-keeper) (JSCA), Sushant Mishra (JSCA), Vidyadhar Patil (KSCA), CTL Rakshan (Hyderabad CA)

 

https://www.bcci.tv/articles/2019/news/139375/four-time-champion-india-announce-u19-cricket-world-cup-squad

Any genuine quicks in the lot?

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Groupings:

Group A: India, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, Japan
Group B: Australia, England, West Indies, Nigeria
Group C: Pakistan, Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, Scotland
Group D: Afghanistan, South Africa, UAE, Canada

 

Interesting that Japan and Nigeria have qualified for the U19 WC for the first time.

Edited by Mosher

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2 hours ago, Mosher said:

 

Groupings:

Group A: India, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, Japan
Group B: Australia, England, West Indies, Nigeria
Group C: Pakistan, Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, Scotland
Group D: Afghanistan, South Africa, UAE, Canada

 

Interesting that Japan and Nigeria have qualified for the U19 WC for the first time.

So Ireland is the only test-playing team that could not qualify. 

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10 hours ago, Mosher said:

 

Groupings:

Group A: India, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, Japan
Group B: Australia, England, West Indies, Nigeria
Group C: Pakistan, Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, Scotland
Group D: Afghanistan, South Africa, UAE, Canada

 

Interesting that Japan and Nigeria have qualified for the U19 WC for the first time.

Group A and B are tough only one minnow in each. Group C has two minnows Pak and Scotland, D has UAE and Canada. 

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12 hours ago, Mosher said:

 

Groupings:

Group A: India, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, Japan
Group B: Australia, England, West Indies, Nigeria
Group C: Pakistan, Bangladesh, Zimbabwe, Scotland
Group D: Afghanistan, South Africa, UAE, Canada

 

Interesting that Japan and Nigeria have qualified for the U19 WC for the first time.

Group B and D make no sense 

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3 hours ago, First class said:

Any future Kohli or even Gill or Shaw ? Who is the top batsman , one to look for ? 

Yashasvi jaiswal, priyam garg nd wicket keeper batsman dhruv jurel.. these are the batsmen to look out for..  rest batsmen doesn't inspire much confidence.. nd had a tough time against even Afghanistan u-19 series.

 

This batch of u-19 doesn't look that strong.. when compared with previous tournament winning batch of shaw nd gill co. However coming south africa tour will tell the real picture.

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1 hour ago, Amit228 said:

Yashasvi jaiswal, priyam garg nd wicket keeper batsman dhruv jurel.. these are the batsmen to look out for..  rest batsmen doesn't inspire much confidence.. nd had a tough time against even Afghanistan u-19 series.

 

This batch of u-19 doesn't look that strong.. when compared with previous tournament winning batch of shaw nd gill co. However coming south africa tour will tell the real picture.

Batsmen who played against Afghanistan aren't selected.

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1 hour ago, rkt.india said:

Batsmen who played against Afghanistan aren't selected.

Only dhruv jurel missed whole series.. while priyam garg, kumar kushagra, tilak varma, jaiswal all were there in Afghanistan series... Barring first ODI where Jaiswal hit 100 to win it for india by 9 wickets... 

Rest of the match batting failed horribly so much so that team didn't even reached 200 whenever batting first against Afghanistan u-19.. 

The issue being batsmen not having ability to rotate strike.. batsmen were consuming too many dots ball with a boundary here and there.. after playing full 50 overs they scored 150.. this is seriously perturbing... considering no top/middle order batsmen can survive in odi cricket without having single/strike rotation game... 

 

Batting this time looks really thin.. nd team with good spinners or fast bowlers will tie down this batting line up.. if they don't improve their strike rotation.. rahul dravid nd co needs to sort out this strike rotation lacunae going into the tournament.. as only that player (top order/middle order batsmen) will graduate from u-19 to domestic to ultimately international cricket.. which has the ability to rotate strike.. nd we need to work on this aspect from colt level itself other wise coming crop of batsmen will be no different from poyz nd nagins..

 

However.. it would be unwise of me to expect international level strike rotation from the colts where even our so called seniors (le-jhunds) a la dhoni, rayudu, jhadhav, pant, rahul etc don't possess strike rotation capabilities.. so i would be happy if jaiswal, priyam nd dhruv make it big in world cup nd emulate gill nd shaw.

Edited by Amit228

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1 hour ago, Amit228 said:

Only dhruv jurel missed whole series.. while priyam garg, kumar kushagra, tilak varma, jaiswal all were there in Afghanistan series... Barring first ODI where Jaiswal hit 100 to win it for india by 9 wickets... 

Rest of the match batting failed horribly so much so that team didn't even reached 200 whenever batting first against Afghanistan u-19.. 

The issue being batsmen not having ability to rotate strike.. batsmen were consuming too many dots ball with a boundary here and there.. after playing full 50 overs they scored 150.. this is seriously perturbing... considering no top/middle order batsmen can survive in odi cricket without having single/strike rotation game... 

 

Batting this time looks really thin.. nd team with good spinners or fast bowlers will tie down this batting line up.. if they don't improve their strike rotation.. rahul dravid nd co needs to sort out this strike rotation lacunae going into the tournament.. as only that player (top order/middle order batsmen) will graduate from u-19 to domestic to ultimately international cricket.. which has the ability to rotate strike.. nd we need to work on this aspect from colt level itself other wise coming crop of batsmen will be no different from poyz nd nagins..

 

However.. it would be unwise of me to expect international level strike rotation from the colts where even our so called seniors (le-jhunds) a la dhoni, rayudu, jhadhav, pant, rahul etc don't possess strike rotation capabilities.. so i would be happy if jaiswal, priyam nd dhruv make it big in world cup nd emulate gill nd shaw.

Most of these batsmen only played first two games. Kushagra is back wk only. Scores reflect the nature of pitches.

 

Edited by rkt.india

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The Priyam Garg story: From standing up to Bhuvneshwar at 15 to leading India at 19

 

Bhuvneshwar Kumar has the ball. Facing him, a boy of 15. Priyam Garg.

"He was standing two or three yards outside the crease while facing up to Bhuvi. As Bhuvi ran in, I stopped him and asked Priyam to look where he's standing. He went back next ball and stood out [of his crease] again. After the over, I asked him and he said, 'since the ball was swinging, I purposely stood out to negate the movement.' Can you imagine, a 15-year-old kid doing that, against an India fast bowler? That is when his game awareness really shone through."

The narrator of the story is Sanjay Rastogi. That boy, Garg, is now set to lead India at the Under-19 World Cup in South Africa, hoping to emulate Mohammad Kaif, Virat Kohli, Unmukt Chand and Prithvi Shaw in lifting the trophy.

 
 

Rastogi, a Meerut-based coach, knows a thing or two about spotting talent. Many years ago, Kiran Pal Singh, Bhuvneshwar's father, brought his son to him. Kiran Pal was simply looking for something to occupy Bhuvneshwar during his summer vacations; two months later, Rastogi returned to him to convince him that his son had a future in cricket.

Bhuvneshwar, of course, is now an elder-brother figure who returns to Victoria Park in Meerut's cantonment area to spend time with Rastogi and his trainees whenever he is in town. In 2015, one of the trainees happened to be Garg, all of 15 and just about beginning to churn out big runs in junior cricket.

Victoria Park had already produced two India fast bowlers in Praveen Kumar and Bhuvneshwar, and it was quite natural that Garg had initially wanted to be a fast bowler too, but Rastogi says it was quickly apparent that there was something special about his batting.

Garg had been training under Rastogi since 2011, the year when his uncle spotted his interest in cricket. It was a World Cup year, and the 12-year old Garg, who hadn't previously liked watching cricket, would be glued to a 14-inch TV at a nearby paan shop, watching every ball of India's matches.

Garg's father Naresh couldn't afford a TV back then. Losses in business and the loss of his wife - Garg's mother - in 2011 left him facing not just financial difficulties but also the challenge of looking after three daughters and two sons.

He overcame his setbacks to establish a small business: selling milk, delivering newspapers and ferrying children to and from school in a mini-van. The business has grown since, and Naresh now runs school buses of his own. Two of his daughters, meanwhile, have gone on to complete degrees in nursing, while the third is preparing for her Civil Services examination. Garg's brother is an instrumentation specialist.

There may have been no TV at home, but young Garg was somewhat insulated from the family's other difficulties. Cricket played a large part in this, and Rastogi's encouraging words about Garg's talent strengthened Naresh's resolve to help his son become a cricketer.

"I developed an interest in cricket in 2011 or thereabouts," Garg tells ESPNcricinfo. We're in his hotel room at a five-star hotel. Mid-August rains in Bengaluru have brought an early end to proceedings in the Duleep Trophy game he's playing. Garg mutes the TV while we speak, but he still keeps an eye on the action.

It's the third Ashes Test, and Steven Smith is batting. Occasionally, when Smith hits a boundary, Garg's eyes veer towards the TV. At other times, he speaks freely about his childhood, and his memories of growing up in Parikshitgarh, 20km from Meerut.

 

Garg was in the running for an India Under-19 berth even in 2018, but missed out on World Cup selection because of a dip in form. He was only 16 then, and the selectors decided to give him time to get back among the runs and regain confidence. Garg says this helped him become better prepared this time around.

"I knew I didn't score runs, so I didn't deserve to be picked," he says. "If I sat there thinking why I didn't get selected, I wouldn't have progressed. My family always kept me going, motivating me that if not now, maybe I will get a chance two years later. That setback helped me figure a way out for myself. My coach only wanted me to get better at every training session."

Garg was fast-tracked into Uttar Pradesh's Ranji Trophy squad on the back of his exploits at the KSCA Invitational tournament in Bangalore in 2018. At Alur - where there are three grounds within the same complex - Rastogi remembers Rahul Dravid, the then India Under-19 coach, watching Garg's batting intently. Garg was the highest run-getter in that tournament, and he made a roaring entry into first-class cricket with a century on debut against Goa.

By the time his debut Ranji season ended, Garg had amassed 814 runs in 10 matches at an average of 67.83. It was the second-highest tally for Uttar Pradesh, behind Rinku Singh's 953. In 12 first-class matches so far, Garg has 867 runs at an average of 66.69, with two centuries, and a best of 206. In List A cricket, he's made 539 runs at 41.46 with one hundred.

The Under-19 tour of England earlier this year gave a further boost to Garg's young career. Since then, he's featured in the Duleep Trophy, the Deodhar Trophy and in the India Emerging teams.

"First-class cricket has given me a head start, I think," Garg says. "Playing against quality attacks is a lesson in how you temper your game to different conditions. In the Duleep Trophy, Faiz Fazal was my captain. I learnt a lot from him, he was a model of discipline in how to carry yourself. I learnt a lot watching him, the likes of Priyank Panchal and Abhimanyu Easwaran - it was a great experience."

As Garg speaks of those who left an impression on him, he's also reminded of sessions with Suresh Raina. Upon his entry into the Uttar Pradesh team, Raina sat him down and helped him relax. Garg is thankful to that gesture. "He made me confident, he came up and spoke," he remembers. "Raina bhai spoke of his growing-up days and how that time, there was a senior-junior divide, and how juniors didn't speak much. He encouraged me and all others to speak freely. That was a good gesture.

 

"Spending time with him and getting to know about him, his life - he spoke about getting a duck on [ODI] debut and what he was feeling at that time - has been really good. I'm thankful to him. His jujhaarupan (drive to work hard) is something I've learnt a lot from. If you want something, you have to have that commitment."

Now as he gets ready to take the next leap in his career, Garg wants to slow things down, and not get too perturbed or carried away by the attention that will invariably follow. He only has to look as far back as January 2018 to understand the kind of attention the Under-19 World Cup winners got. An IPL deal could be up for grabs too, but for the moment all that isn't on his mind.

"I played a bit of cricket with them, that [2018] batch was amazing," Garg says. "I have fond memories of spending time with some of those boys. It will be amazing if we can win a fifth Under-19 World Cup for India."

 
 

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8 minutes ago, Ankit_sharma03 said:

The Priyam Garg story: From standing up to Bhuvneshwar at 15 to leading India at 19

 

Bhuvneshwar Kumar has the ball. Facing him, a boy of 15. Priyam Garg.

"He was standing two or three yards outside the crease while facing up to Bhuvi. As Bhuvi ran in, I stopped him and asked Priyam to look where he's standing. He went back next ball and stood out [of his crease] again. After the over, I asked him and he said, 'since the ball was swinging, I purposely stood out to negate the movement.' Can you imagine, a 15-year-old kid doing that, against an India fast bowler? That is when his game awareness really shone through."

The narrator of the story is Sanjay Rastogi. That boy, Garg, is now set to lead India at the Under-19 World Cup in South Africa, hoping to emulate Mohammad Kaif, Virat Kohli, Unmukt Chand and Prithvi Shaw in lifting the trophy.

 
 

Rastogi, a Meerut-based coach, knows a thing or two about spotting talent. Many years ago, Kiran Pal Singh, Bhuvneshwar's father, brought his son to him. Kiran Pal was simply looking for something to occupy Bhuvneshwar during his summer vacations; two months later, Rastogi returned to him to convince him that his son had a future in cricket.

Bhuvneshwar, of course, is now an elder-brother figure who returns to Victoria Park in Meerut's cantonment area to spend time with Rastogi and his trainees whenever he is in town. In 2015, one of the trainees happened to be Garg, all of 15 and just about beginning to churn out big runs in junior cricket.

Victoria Park had already produced two India fast bowlers in Praveen Kumar and Bhuvneshwar, and it was quite natural that Garg had initially wanted to be a fast bowler too, but Rastogi says it was quickly apparent that there was something special about his batting.

Garg had been training under Rastogi since 2011, the year when his uncle spotted his interest in cricket. It was a World Cup year, and the 12-year old Garg, who hadn't previously liked watching cricket, would be glued to a 14-inch TV at a nearby paan shop, watching every ball of India's matches.

Garg's father Naresh couldn't afford a TV back then. Losses in business and the loss of his wife - Garg's mother - in 2011 left him facing not just financial difficulties but also the challenge of looking after three daughters and two sons.

He overcame his setbacks to establish a small business: selling milk, delivering newspapers and ferrying children to and from school in a mini-van. The business has grown since, and Naresh now runs school buses of his own. Two of his daughters, meanwhile, have gone on to complete degrees in nursing, while the third is preparing for her Civil Services examination. Garg's brother is an instrumentation specialist.

There may have been no TV at home, but young Garg was somewhat insulated from the family's other difficulties. Cricket played a large part in this, and Rastogi's encouraging words about Garg's talent strengthened Naresh's resolve to help his son become a cricketer.

"I developed an interest in cricket in 2011 or thereabouts," Garg tells ESPNcricinfo. We're in his hotel room at a five-star hotel. Mid-August rains in Bengaluru have brought an early end to proceedings in the Duleep Trophy game he's playing. Garg mutes the TV while we speak, but he still keeps an eye on the action.

It's the third Ashes Test, and Steven Smith is batting. Occasionally, when Smith hits a boundary, Garg's eyes veer towards the TV. At other times, he speaks freely about his childhood, and his memories of growing up in Parikshitgarh, 20km from Meerut.

 

Garg was in the running for an India Under-19 berth even in 2018, but missed out on World Cup selection because of a dip in form. He was only 16 then, and the selectors decided to give him time to get back among the runs and regain confidence. Garg says this helped him become better prepared this time around.

"I knew I didn't score runs, so I didn't deserve to be picked," he says. "If I sat there thinking why I didn't get selected, I wouldn't have progressed. My family always kept me going, motivating me that if not now, maybe I will get a chance two years later. That setback helped me figure a way out for myself. My coach only wanted me to get better at every training session."

Garg was fast-tracked into Uttar Pradesh's Ranji Trophy squad on the back of his exploits at the KSCA Invitational tournament in Bangalore in 2018. At Alur - where there are three grounds within the same complex - Rastogi remembers Rahul Dravid, the then India Under-19 coach, watching Garg's batting intently. Garg was the highest run-getter in that tournament, and he made a roaring entry into first-class cricket with a century on debut against Goa.

By the time his debut Ranji season ended, Garg had amassed 814 runs in 10 matches at an average of 67.83. It was the second-highest tally for Uttar Pradesh, behind Rinku Singh's 953. In 12 first-class matches so far, Garg has 867 runs at an average of 66.69, with two centuries, and a best of 206. In List A cricket, he's made 539 runs at 41.46 with one hundred.

The Under-19 tour of England earlier this year gave a further boost to Garg's young career. Since then, he's featured in the Duleep Trophy, the Deodhar Trophy and in the India Emerging teams.

"First-class cricket has given me a head start, I think," Garg says. "Playing against quality attacks is a lesson in how you temper your game to different conditions. In the Duleep Trophy, Faiz Fazal was my captain. I learnt a lot from him, he was a model of discipline in how to carry yourself. I learnt a lot watching him, the likes of Priyank Panchal and Abhimanyu Easwaran - it was a great experience."

As Garg speaks of those who left an impression on him, he's also reminded of sessions with Suresh Raina. Upon his entry into the Uttar Pradesh team, Raina sat him down and helped him relax. Garg is thankful to that gesture. "He made me confident, he came up and spoke," he remembers. "Raina bhai spoke of his growing-up days and how that time, there was a senior-junior divide, and how juniors didn't speak much. He encouraged me and all others to speak freely. That was a good gesture.

 

"Spending time with him and getting to know about him, his life - he spoke about getting a duck on [ODI] debut and what he was feeling at that time - has been really good. I'm thankful to him. His jujhaarupan (drive to work hard) is something I've learnt a lot from. If you want something, you have to have that commitment."

Now as he gets ready to take the next leap in his career, Garg wants to slow things down, and not get too perturbed or carried away by the attention that will invariably follow. He only has to look as far back as January 2018 to understand the kind of attention the Under-19 World Cup winners got. An IPL deal could be up for grabs too, but for the moment all that isn't on his mind.

"I played a bit of cricket with them, that [2018] batch was amazing," Garg says. "I have fond memories of spending time with some of those boys. It will be amazing if we can win a fifth Under-19 World Cup for India."

 
 

If he was 12 in 2011, how can he be 16 in  January 2018 at the time of u19 wc. He would at least be 18 if not 19. 

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1 minute ago, Ankit_sharma03 said:

 

20 or 21 actually 

2011-2020 is 9 years , even if we take 8 yrs coz due to months he ll still be 20 next yr

I was talking about 2018 WC. Article says he was 16 at the time of last u19 WC but if he was 12 in 2011 then couldn't be 16 in January 2018.

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