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Statistics : IPL 2008

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Bowlers come to the party Twenty-20 might be a batsman dominated form of cricket but three bowlers sent out a strong message by picking a hat-trick each in the third leg of the IPL.See graphics More... Bowlers come to the party Hindustan Times May 20, 2008 First Published: 01:09 IST(20/5/2008) Last Updated: 01:17 IST(20/5/2008) Twenty-20 might be a batsman dominated form of cricket, but by using the mechanism to measure the distance of each sixer and flashing it on the screen, the authorities might be rubbing salt into the bowlers’ wounds. It is like telling the bowlers, “Gentlemen, thanks for coming.” As if standing up for their ilk, three bowlers sent out a strong message by picking a hat-trick each in the third leg of the IPL. Laxmipathy Balaji, Amit Mishra and Makhaya Ntini all proved that they were there to play more than be the supporting cast. Given the compressed nature of the game, it is a remote probability that a bowler picks three wickets in his spell, leave alone off successive balls. But when it does happen, the rare phenomenon has a definite impact on the outcome of the match. That’s exactly what happened in each of the above three instances. Balaji couldn’t have claimed his hat-trick at a more appropriate time. Having gone off national reckoning in the past two years owing to injury, the Tamil Nadu man bowled a deadly spell against Mohali. He exploited the unusual bounce offered by the track at MA Chidambaram stadium, peppering the batsmen with short-pitched deliveries. As it were, his hat-trick was just a consequence of some good seam bowling. Mishra too made the selectors take note of him with his final over exploits against Hyderabad. His variation bamboozled the Hyderabad batsmen and bowled Delhi to a crucial win. Ntini’s was a professional performance. With the Chennai team finding itself short of bowling resources, it was imperative for the South African to deliver. He did just that at the Eden Gardens on Sunday. TAKING A STOCK: 30 DAYS ON match_20_may.jpg

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Why Rajasthan have been such a force With the league stage of the IPL drawing to a close, there's enough data on teams to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of each. Which ones have capitalised the most on the Powerplay overs, and which have been the best finishers? The numbers tell the story. More... Why Rajasthan have been such a force Which IPL teams have capitalised the most on Powerplays, and which have been the best finishers S Rajesh May 23, 2008 With the league stage of the IPL drawing to a close, there's enough data on teams to analyse the strengths and weaknesses of each. Which ones have capitalised the most on the Powerplay overs, with both bat and ball? Which ones have been the strongest through the middle overs, and which the best at the finish? The numbers tell the story. 339848.jpg Gautam Gambhir's performances have been a huge factor in Delhi's superb display at the start of their innings © Getty Images The powerful starters With Sreesanth and Irfan Pathan regularly among the wickets, and Shaun Marsh in terrific touch with the bat, Kings XI Punjab have been among the best teams at the start of an innings with both bat and ball. Their batsmen average more than 40 runs per wicket during the Powerplay overs (the first six of the innings) at a run-rate of more than 8.5, while the bowlers have taken 23 wickets during this period, which is second only to Kolkata's 25 during the Powerplays. The difference between Punjab's batting and bowling quotient (calculated by multiplying the average by the runs scored/ conceded per ball) is 26.45, easily higher than the rest. Delhi Daredevils are up there too, thanks to an outstanding top three of Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag and Shikhar Dhawan, who have put Delhi on course with the bat, and Glenn McGrath's impeccable performances with the new ball. They have lost just 16 wickets during the Powerplays, which is second only to Punjab's 14. At the other end of the spectrum are Bangalore Royal Challengers, for whom not much has gone right during this tournament. Theirs starts - with both bat and ball - have been particularly dismal. They've lost 26 wickets during the first six overs, at an average and scoring-rate that have ensured absolutely no momentum. For a team that has Dale Steyn, Zaheer Khan and Praveen Kumar as their pace attack, they've been hugely disappointing with the ball, taking just 12 wickets during the Powerplays, the least by any team. Steyn has only taken seven wickets in eight games, while Zaheer has leaked 8.50 runs per over for his 13 wickets. Teams in the Powerplay overs

Team Bat - average Run-rate Ave x runs per ball (1) Bowl - average Run-rate Ave x runs per ball (2) 1 - 2 
Kings XI Punjab 40.50 8.59 57.98 23.30 8.12 31.53 26.45 
Delhi Daredevils 39.25 8.72 57.06 28.75 7.99 38.27 18.79 
Mumbai Indians 31.00 8.51 43.97 20.00 7.09 27.65 16.32 
Rajasthan Royals 32.00 7.75 41.33 27.72 7.56 34.93 6.41 
Deccan Chargers 30.76 7.92 40.60 30.81 7.46 38.31 2.30 
Kolkata Knight Riders 17.89 6.71 20.00 20.88 7.25 25.23 -5.23 
Chennai Super Kings 33.50 7.44 41.56 37.50 8.33 52.08 -10.52 
Bangalore Royal Challengers 17.96 6.49 19.42 48.42 8.07 65.12 -45.70 
Strong in the middle Rajasthan Royals haven't been exceptional at the start with either bat or ball, but their strengths have been the middle and final overs. They've scored at a fair clip in the overs between 7 and 14, but their real heroes have been their bowlers during this period. Shane Warne and Co have taken 27 wickets in the middle overs, which is the highest by any team during this period. Ten of Warne's 14 wickets have come during this period, at a cost of 17.40 runs per wicket and an excellent economy-rate of 6.69 runs per over. Delhi and Punjab haven't done badly during this period either, but Chennai Super Kings, who are third on the points table, languish in second-last position in the calculations in both the first six and the middle overs. Their problem has primarily been the inability to take wickets: during the Powerplays they've managed just 16 wickets in 12 games, and they've taken an equal number of wickets during the middle overs as well, at an exorbitant average of 49.75 runs per wicket. Their bowling index (average multiplied by runs conceded per ball) is 68.87, easily the worst among all teams. Their batsmen have done reasonably well - their batting index is third among the eight teams - but the lack of bowling ability finds them in seventh place overall. The only team that lags behind them is Bangalore, who have lost 28 wickets during the middle overs, easily the highest among all teams. Teams in the middle overs (7-14)
Team Bat - average Run-rate Ave x runs per ball (1) Bowl - average Run-rate Ave x runs per ball (2) 1 - 2 
Rajasthan Royals 35.71 8.52 50.71 22.40 6.88 25.66 25.02 
Delhi Daredevils 43.28 8.68 48.97 29.29 7.81 38.13 22.94 
Kings XI Punjab 33.85 8.68 48.97 27.12 7.97 36.02 12.95 
Mumbai Indians 29.52 7.76 38.18 30.47 8.13 41.29 -3.11 
Kolkata Knight Riders 28.17 6.75 31.70 27.95 7.50 34.94 -3.25 
Deccan Chargers 30.57 7.45 37.96 41.47 8.10 55.99 -18.03 
Chennai Super Kings 36.50 8.11 49.34 49.75 8.31 68.87 -19.53 
Bangalore Royal Challengers 24.57 7.17 29.35 40.26 7.97 53.47 -24.13 
Finishing with a flourish After dominating the middle overs, Rajasthan have also gone on to finish innings better than the other sides. They've only lost 18 wickets during the last six overs of their innings, while their bowlers have taken 32. Shane Watson has led the way with the bat, scoring 92 runs from 46 deliveries during this period, while Mohammad Kaif (63 from 34) and Yusuf Pathan (41 from 19) haven't done badly either. Delhi have been outstanding with the ball during the last six, taking 35 wickets, but their batsmen haven't had as much success, averaging just 15.71 runs per wicket at less than nine per over. Apart from Rajasthan, the other team that has impressed in the final overs is Chennai. Their bowlers have snaffled 33 wickets at a reasonably economical rate, while their batsmen have turned it on, scoring at 10.10 runs per over in the last six, thanks largely to S Badrinath - who has scored 105 off 52 balls - and Mahendra Singh Dhoni (182 off 111). This is also the only parameter on which Bangalore aren't right at the bottom of the pile. That spot goes to the Deccan Chargers, who have leaked runs at 11.31 per over. Andrew Symonds has been the worst offender, going for 38 in 11 balls, while D Kalyankrishna has given away 51 in 18. Teams in the last six overs
Team Bat - average Run-rate Ave x runs per ball (1) Bowl - average Run-rate Ave x runs per ball (2) 1 - 2 
Rajasthan Royals 24.77 10.29 42.48 15.06 8.84 22.19 20.36 
Chennai Super Kings 23.19 10.10 39.02 16.30 9.44 25.65 13.36 
Mumbai Indians 18.95 9.51 30.04 15.00 9.56 23.90 6.14 
Kings XI Punjab 21.78 9.57 34.74 19.89 9.68 32.09 2.65 
Delhi Daredevils 15.71 8.95 23.44 16.49 9.85 24.58 -1.14 
Kolkata Knight Riders 20.52 10.34 35.36 23.94 10.30 41.11 -5.75 
Bangalore Royal Challengers 14.08 8.65 20.30 24.70 9.88 40.66 -20.36 
Deccan Chargers 17.48 10.18 29.66 27.59 11.31 52.01 -22.35 

All stats till the 46th match of the IPL, between Chennai and Bangalore.

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Orange Cap: Firmly on Gambhir's head with the second best scorer, Marsh 85 runs behind him. Purple cap: Now Tanvir own it and I'm surprised why he was not presented the cap yesterday in match against Super Kings. Warne and Sree are joint second. Highest six hitter: Jayasurya is leading the pack comfortably with 27 sixes at this stage. Best economy rate: For bowlers having bowled 30 or more overs, Tanvir has the best economy rate. Otherwise Dilshan is leading the table here.

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