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Celebrating Sachin Tendulkar's 20 glorious years [Update: 28th year]

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November 15, 2009 will be the day when Sachin will complete 20th year in international cricket. I'll request everyone to write something or post few images as a tribute to this phenomenal journey which is still going on. I'm posting an interview which came out in HT:

 

The early years

Pradeep Magazine, Hindustan Times

November 09, 2009

First Published: 23:11 IST(9/11/2009)

Last Updated: 01:19 IST(10/11/2009)

Quote

After two decades of international cricket, what childhood memories come back to you most vividly? Those images would be that of playing for India, before that would be playing with my friends in my building where I wanted to be the best. I was nine or 10 then, we played with tennis balls and I liked accepting challenges.

Challenges like? I was the top-scorer in our age-group events and when I was 10, a couple of my friends challenged me to face a guy of about 22-23 without pads with a seasoned ball (a proper cricket ball). I straightaway said, ‘why won’t I be able to do it, what’s the big deal’! I faced him and managed quite well.

What was the atmosphere like at home? Did they not mind your playing the whole day? They gave me a lot of freedom, especially my father. My brother was instrumental in making everything possible. Father was very understanding, he would give the green signal, but the ideas were definitely my brother’s.

Did your father believe you were good enough to play for India? He encouraged me. The first year of school cricket was not that big for me. In the second year, I managed to score a hundred and I believed I was good enough.

Did you idolise anyone? I was a huge (John) McEnroe fan and of (Viv) Richards and (Sunil) Gavaskar.

Why didn’t tennis become an option? All my friends and people from 0 to 45 watched Wimbledon. I remember them backing Bjorn Borg but I rooted for McEnroe. mmez6c.jpg

 

Why then did you opt for cricket? I don’t know, I mean...maybe it was that one could manage to play together and cricket did not require a tennis court or whatever. Cricket just needed three stumps, bat and ball and you could play anywhere.

 

At what stage did you realise you could make it big and play for India? When I scored my first inter-school hundred, I thought this is something special and if I can do something like this on a regular basis, then things can change.

Where did you get this confidence, even at that age — to believe you would make it big and when just 16, the way you faced one of the best pace attacks ever in the world (Waqar, Wasim and Imran)?

Yeah, I probably was just confident about my abilities and, as I said earlier, I like accepting challenges — that could be one of the reasons. zslo4y.jpg

 

At any point, when you were a child, did you think you wouldn’t be able to make it to the Indian team? While playing, I definitely did not think I wouldn’t make it. I was not overconfident, but somehow I knew that one day I would play for India. It was just a question of when but I knew I would play for India.

rwo03m.jpg

 

Did you ever think that one day you would do to the world what you were doing to your friends in your backyard? Honestly, I did not think that far. I felt I had to be considered as one of the top players to play this game.

When you failed in your debut, did you feel upset? Definitely. I felt bad, started doubting my ability and started wondering ‘do I really belong here?’ I felt I was too tense, too nervous. Everything fell out of place. I was not so sure.

Was that your first failure in life? Yeah, I mean it was a different ballgame altogether. I mean you are going to play Ranji and then you are going to play top-class bowling in the world, Wasim (Akram), Imran (Khan) on helpful tracks. It was a fresh experience.

How did things change for you? When I was picked to play the 2nd Test, I told myself, come what may, I will hang around…I’m not going to accept defeat, I’m going to stay there. I spoke to a lot of guys in the team, they said, stay there for the first 20 minutes, thing would get easier, and it actually happened. I started feeling normal, my nerves started to calm down and I could see the ball better. My footwork was better; my state of mind was better. After that, I scored 59 in my 2nd innings, which was the first innings of the 2nd Test. After that I believed ‘yes I can’. f4n42f.jpg

 

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Sachin is perfect: VVS Laxman My favourite Sachin innings In ODIs, I’d choose the Sharjah century against Australia in 1998; I was the non-striker and watched it from up close. In Tests, the 1996-97 Cape Town hundred is a personal favourite, and for different reasons the double-hundred in Sydney, where he was so much in control of his game plan. For emotional reasons, two Chennai tons: Pakistan in 1999 and recently against England, where he hit the winning runs. His greatest strength From a batting point of view: balance. This helps him pick the length and get in position quickly. Then there’s the hunger for runs. Most importantly, even after so many years, he prepares with such intensity for each match, each situation. The work he puts in, the attention to detail, sets him apart. Sachin and me What stands out is the person. The achievements , the laurels, the expectations, everyone wants a piece of him ... the way he carries himself is a lesson. His respect for elders, how he encourages youngsters, his family values. A weakness? I can’t think of one. He’s perfect. He was born and made to play cricket. My message for Sachin I just wish him all the best and hope he carries on for as long as possible. The longer he carries on, the better it is for Indian cricket. The encouragement, input and help he brings to the dressing-room are things that make a huge difference. LINK

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A tribute from close friend Ricky Couto up close & personal - HOPPINGO/BATTINGO, VADA-PAV AND BATTING TO STAY OUT OF SCHOOL Ricky Couto Let me be honest. Shardashram Vidya Mandir (SVM) was all about cricket for some of us. Sachin, Vinod (Kambli ) and I, had specifically moved to the school to play cricket, on the advice of (Ramakant) Achrekar sir. We were not interested in studies and it showed; Sachin averaged about 50 % in exams. We were talkative, mischievous and often got punished for throwing ink on others. We also formed a gang in school that others were wary of. Some kids were so scared of being beaten up that they would not leave the school premises till we were gone. Our Physical Training and Chemistry teachers were very strict, and sometimes threw a duster at us. Sachin, like any other schoolboy, would say `sorry'. Now the teachers proudly say they punished Sachin in school. iddkx0.jpg Sachin was very good at table tennis and whenever he had time off he used to play in the car park. Another game we played a lot was one we called Hoppingo/Battingo -- a game where one had the right to beat his mate if he didn't say hoppingo/battingo before sitting/standing. Most of the time, I was at the receiving end. He plays the game even today with his best pals, surprising many in the dressing room. We loved to skip classes at the pretext of playing cricket. Sharadashram used to give us leave for cricket and even if a match was to end on the first day with very less to achieve, Sachin and Vinod would bat the day out to take the game into the next day, so that we would get a full day's leave. They'd finish the match early and we all would go for Hindi movies. Sachin raised the toast at my wedding. While giving his speech, he said he was as nervous as he was during his Test debut. (Ricky and Sachin were back-benchers at SVM from Standard VII to X). A tribute by Leander Paes 2dguahg.jpg It takesone to knowone - I took him on and he beat me hollow! To me, longevity is the hallmark of greatness and Sachin epitomises that. That's talking pure sport. But when we begin to judge greatness as a human being, then anyone's greatest asset is humility. Sachin's poise and composure in the face of constant public scrutiny is remarkable, in fact, it's almost superhuman. Over the years, I have met him a number of times but the one interaction ingrained in my mind is the time we spent together at the Taj Exotica in Goa. It was December 2000 and we had gone down there for an Adidas commercial. Now, I earn my living from my skill with a racquet and consider myself pretty good at most racquet games. So I was not really too bothered about being able to hold my own when Sachin challenged me to a game of table tennis. I went in confident, but in a short while I was shellshocked. The man has incredible skill with the paddle and his reflexes are razor sharp. He literally destroyed me. Neither of us is known for giving up easy. What began as fun became a fierce contest of wills and we played over 30 games. I won about 10. The incredible bit was his ambidexterity. He could rip winning smashes with either hand! I am convinced that he would have been world-class no matter what sport he played. Cricket is lucky he chose to redefine that particular sport.

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wow. Thats a good interview Ludh, not seen that one. You hear it said that he was 16 etc on debut, but its only when you see him so small makes you realise how young he was. Blimey, 16!!

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wow. Thats a good interview Ludh, not seen that one. You hear it said that he was 16 etc on debut, but its only when you see him so small makes you realise how young he was. Blimey, 16!!
Really ??

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wow. Thats a good interview Ludh, not seen that one. You hear it said that he was 16 etc on debut, but its only when you see him so small makes you realise how young he was. Blimey, 16!!
erm yeah really havent seen it. I iz ashamed. call myself a fan, its disgraceful.
I have to agree with that last line, SORRY :yes: I have seen that video at least 100 times! minimum... The first line he says in that video is my favorite line in the entire universe "oh, I think it's just a start" The god seemed to know that w/e people are jamming about him at that point of time was nothing compared to what is stored in the future :hail:

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wow. Thats a good interview Ludh, not seen that one. You hear it said that he was 16 etc on debut, but its only when you see him so small makes you realise how young he was. Blimey, 16!!
My favourite part of the interview is the way he pronounces bat. He says 'bat-tah'. It's almost as if he's mentally playing a shot when saying the word, hence the 'tah' addition, which is similar to the sound the bat makes when striking the ball.

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My favourite part of the interview is the way he pronounces bat. He says 'bat-tah'. It's almost as if he's mentally playing a shot when saying the word' date=' hence the 'tah' addition, which is similar to the sound the bat makes when striking the ball.[/quote'] He still says bat the same way he did 20 years ago :dance: find any of his videos (post match presentations/interviews etc.) and you will realize that he still pronounces bat the same way :yes: what amazes me the most is that the interviewer is white and yet he pronounces all Indian names properly...:cheer:

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making of the legend :hail: [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5RSm1EXRJM]YouTube- 1of4 Tendulkar-Making of a legend[/ame] [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABgzgHyAzyc]YouTube- 2of4 Tendulkar making of a legend[/ame] [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4MSsfvGBOs]YouTube- 3of4 Tendulkar Making of a legend[/ame] [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQgK5cg2JvI]YouTube- 4of4 Tendualkar making of a legend[/ame] I think now they can add another 30-60 minutes to this series "making of the legend" :hail:

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Here is the second part of the interview that I posted in OP. THOSE WONDER YEARS - A LEGEND IS BORN PART II Don Bradman once said that Tendulkar's batting style was closest to his own. Here, Sachin talks cricket 11j0y7a.jpg Pradeep Magazine ( pradeepmagazine@gmail.com ) When you look back today, what do you think was the turning point of your career, in terms of international stardom and becoming what you wanted? I think my first Test hundred in England when I was 17, it kept us alive in the series. If you do well in England or Australia, the world takes note. Immediately after, in Australia, I scored two hundreds, on different surfaces, one in Sydney and the other on the bouncy wicket of Perth. nwiobb.jpg You still rate the Perth one as your best? Yes, one of the tops. Because of the quality of the innings or because you were so young? Not age, but I think, the quality of attack, the kind of surface we played on... given the circumstances, what I was able to achieve. Did you set yourself targets once you knew you were here to stay? I would sort of set targets, but would obviously keep them to myself. What sorts of targets would you set at that time? It depended on that particular series or the kind of bowling attack -- what I was going to achieve, the contribution to the team... all those factors were taken into consideration in setting a goal. I would look to achieve that. At that time, did you ever feel you had shortcomings on fast tracks against pace and needed to improve? By God's grace I have not felt uncomfortable in facing a particular attack. I felt I was in a position to tackle anything and everything. But at the same time, I took nothing for granted. I prepared to the best of my ability. How did it feel to be talked about as the boy who would become the greatest? It felt wonderful. I took confidence from all the positive statements made about me and with the help of that confidence I looked to climb the ladder. I would only look at the positives and not worry about negatives. Every individual will have faults, I would rather... I used my strengths, my energy in the right direction. I would think of factors that would help me contribute. I took that confidence along whenever I went out to bat. I did not read any newspaper -- I sort of avoided reading them! Which bowlers did you admire, who troubled you the most? I always felt that the Australians have been the leading side of the world and to do well against them was a great challenge, something I looked forward to. rsv5gz.jpg Any names? Who would you say is the finest bowler of your time? There have been many, I would say, right from first series. Wasim, Waqar, Imran, Qadir... the second series saw Richard Hadllee; then Angus Fraser, Devon Malcolm, then we went to South Africa and it was Alan Donald. In Australia (Craig) McDermott really bowled well. If you had to rate one bower? It is tough to single out one bowler, you know there have been so many greats, all the guys with more than 400 wickets -- it is difficult. It is up to an individual to rate them because he feels that way about them. So from your perspective? Probably, (pauses, takes a lot of time) like, probably (pauses again) hmmm... (Glenn) McGrath would be the most accurate one. Also the most troublesome for you? Yeah, I have scored hundreds against him but he is probably the one who... You demonstrated your anger, something so rare, while attacking him once. Was it because of his calibre as a bowler? It was sort of a strategy actually. This happened only once, in Kenya in the Champions Trophy (2001). We won the toss and batted. The way he bowled the first over, Sourav was captain and I told him that this strategy might work, I told him to let me execute it, go after him and get into a little bit of a verbal battle. Basically unsettle him and not allow him to bowl where he wanted to. And it succeeded... It succeeded, because I hit him for three sixes. What makes you such an outstanding all-surface player? Your game and style of play moulds itself around the nature of the wicket. I don't know, I always discussed the kind of surface and all that with my brother (Ajit). His inputs have all always helped. Even today, I discuss cricket with him. His inputs are invaluable. If a wicket is hard and pacy, you play on the rise, if it is slow and turning, you use your wrists more often. Is this your greatest ability, apart from technical skills? It's a little difficult for me to answer this -- the opposition would be better placed to do so. A batsman looks to play according to the surface, and adjust according to it. That is what I tried to do. I have adopted a defensive strategy when I could be a little more patient, sometimes I decide to counterattack and take on the opposition. For a man who hates being second best, will not being a successful long-term captain be a sore point in your career? Not really, not really, absolutely not. At no stage was I fond of captaincy. I have always been fond of playing. It really does not matter, as captaincy is not about an individual. It is about the team. It has a lot to do with other members of the team. You mean you did not have a good enough team under you? The team was definitely good. But if I have to compare today, then we definitely have more match winners now. (IN PART III, HE LOOKS AT WHAT LIES AHEAD, PERSONALLY & CRICKET-WISE) DID YOU KNOW A believer in Ganpati, Sachin goes to the Siddhivinayak temple in Prabhadevi, Mumbai, generally after midnight. THE LITTLE MASTER IN NUMBERS ehyj4.jpg 185 The number of ODIs he played between April 1990 and April 1998, a world record. 523 Is the number of runs he scored in the '96 World Cup -- the highest in the edition. 4The number of times (1994, 1996, 1997 and 1998) he scored over 1000 ODI runs in a calendar year. 2i7ti8m.jpgrvf2b7.jpg

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That 44 that Dravid mentioned was a most remarkable knock. Ambrose, Bishop, Rose and Walsh were ripping the Indians apart on a very helpful track and here was Tendulkar driving on the up, pulling, cutting his way to 44 off 43 with 10 boundaries.

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A must watch for every ICFer This is nostalgia [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjQcdpOjVlQ]YouTube- tendulkar at 25 part 1[/ame] [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuPtn_qBy2Q]YouTube- tendulkar at 25 part 2[/ame] [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANl39xuZgms]YouTube- tendulkar at 25 part 3[/ame] [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=datvETn3tCI]YouTube- tendulkar at 25 part 4[/ame]

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A Tribute by Dhanraj Pillay 2e64ftd.jpg Sachin -- Hero No. 1 Representing the country for 20 years is no mean achievement and it shows Sachin's dedication and the hard work he has put in to become the best batsman in the world. I should know what it takes to play at the highest level for a long period as I've played hockey for India for 16 years. I have met him many times and we usually talk in Marathi. There's a mutual respect and he cares for other sports also and helps people quietly, without advertising it and that's what all celebrities should do. 2gu9vth.jpg One particular incident is a lesson for every celebrity. I've played in the Malaysian league and have many friends there. One of them has named his son after Sachin. A few years ago when Sachin went to Malaysia, my friend wanted his fouryear-old son to meet the man he was named after, and called me from outside the hotel to arrange a meeting. I requested him to take some time out for the kid. Sachin not only obliged but gave some presents to the boy and sat him on his shoulders for a photograph. The boy was very thrilled and still cherishes those moments. That incident made me realise what a great person Sachin is. He has earned so much fame and money but his feet are still grounded. That's the hallmark of a sound upbringing. He's got this ability of not letting things get to his head. This is one thing every celebrity should learn from him. (Pillay, the former India captain, spoke to B. Shrikant) A Tribute by Hemant Kenkre 262lehk.jpg `What's pressure?' The year was 1987, shortly after the Reliance World Cup, when we picked up Sachin to play for CCI at the behest of Achrekar. Sachin was leaving for Pune for an under-15 camp and his pads were stolen. Only two people in Mumbai other than me had ultralight Morrant pads. Achrekar called to say Sachin is a good cricketer and that he needed pads. I did not think twice about parting with mine. I captained CCI whenever Sandeep Patil was away playing in Kenya and early in the season, with players away in England we often picked players from Achrekar's wards. We were to play Sivaji Park Youngsters and Achrekar told me to have a look at Sachin before picking him for CCI. He scored a brilliant halfcentury on a rank turner. We wanted to give Sachin playing membership at CCI and had to amend the rules as he was only 15 then! Once CCI was playing Catholic Gymkhana and their manager asked how he plays under pressure. Sachin, standing next to me, replied "what pressure?" Sachin's dad often used to call me to say, "Tell him to study". Once, after he had begun playing for India, I went to his house. Sachin returned from playing TT to make tea for us and his father asked why he wasn't studying. I said, "he has already got a Ph.D in cricket". 111npg8.jpg (Hemant Kenkre, Sachin's first captain at CCI, spoke to G Krishnan)

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what amazes me the most is that the interviewer is white and yet he pronounces all Indian names properly...:cheer:
He's Tom Alter.A well known theatre personlity.. When ever he appears on any cricket related discussions,he always brags regarding this interview.The first one to interview 15 year old Sachin on TV. PS Tom Alter is of American origin

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You demonstrated your anger, something so rare, while attacking him once. Was it because of his calibre as a bowler? It was sort of a strategy actually. This happened only once, in Kenya in the Champions Trophy (2001). We won the toss and batted. The way he bowled the first over, Sourav was captain and I told him that this strategy might work, I told him to let me execute it, go after him and get into a little bit of a verbal battle. Basically unsettle him and not allow him to bowl where he wanted to. -------------- Oh man, this was a hell of knock, really tore into McG- only scored 30-something I think but smashed Mcgrath out of the attack Cracking match this was too, Zaheer bowling S Waugh, Yuvraj's 84. Muhahaha

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Terrific thread, good to see collection of articles and tributes. The best tribute is paid by Paes when he said : "Cricket is lucky he chose to redefine that particular sport."

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And now the concluding part of the interview: PART III He thinks T20s have a role, but believes that income from Tests should be higher than T20s to ensure people want to play the five-day game. THOSE WONDER YEARS : CRICKET CHANGES & ME Pradeep Magazine , Hindustan Times What major changes have you seen in cricket over a period of time? Which of these are good for the game and which, bad? Test cricket has definitely become faster, there are more shots played, more runs scored, batsmen innovate more and are prepared to take more chances both because of the introduction of Twenty20 cricket and the fact that there’s plenty of one-day cricket played. That is one positive change. Isn’t the amount of T20s played a worry? At this stage I feel T20s are fine, something one would like to see, the game getting globalised that is. With the introduction of T20, more non cricket-playing countries are coming to the game. Don’t you think T20s are more a game of hit and miss and take away the skills of the game? This is (the opinion) for the connoisseurs of the game. But if you have to show cricket to a Japanese, Chinese or Korean guy and explain what is going on for five days, it would obviously require mega effort. You obviously take pride in your Test achievements? Absolutely, for me Test cricket is Number One. Doesn’t the perception that T20 might dislodge Test cricket bother you? No, it will not. Tests are in no danger at all. I think, just to introduce someone to cricket, Twenty20 is a good format. Once they start understanding the game, then Test cricket obviously has a lot more in it to study. Aren’t you worried that the game’s administrators will ignore Tests, seeing how much money comes in from the shorter versions? I don’t think so. Ideally, I would say that we all regard Test cricket as No. 1 compared to one-day and T20 cricket, so the match fees and income from playing Test cricket have to be significantly more than from T20s. Then people would want to play more Tests than other formats. And, it is not all about the money. When I started, playing Test cricket was my dream. But that might not be the case for today’s kids? Yeah, it is different era. Who knows what is going to happen 10-20 years from now? At this moment though, I feel Test cricket is by far Number One, for me. Will you feel sad, if a day comes when Tendulkar’s Test record may not be important but his one-day or T20 record will be considered a bigger achievement? I am pretty sure it won’t happen. You still play with child-like passion. What motivates you now? Honestly, it is within me. I don’t think any external factor is needed to motivate me. Playing for India is in itself a huge motivation and I take a lot of pride in playing for India. I care about cricket. This is all I ever wanted to do. Have you ever thought that someday, you will have to give up cricket? Does that thought frighten you? Not at this stage, I am enjoying my game and there is cricket left in me. We all hope you carry on till 2011 and beyond, but does the thought that there could be a day when you won’t be playing scare you? At this stage I am not thinking of it at all. At some stage one will have to, but I don’t need to think about that right now. What I’m saying is that it will be appropriate to think about it when the situation arises. Right now, it is not something I want to do. Is playing the next World Cup your next big dream? There is a lot of cricket before that. You want to take one step at a time. Right now I am not thinking about that. But would you want to be part of a winning World Cup team in 2011? Oh, yeah, yeah, that will be something special. On a different tack, how does it feel when people say that Sachin does not help India win matches? I don’t know. How can I answer that, it is for the people to look at a broader picture. How can I answer that? If I were not contributing for India, then I would not have scored as many runs. 2dr53t0.jpg Who would you call the best Indian cricketer of your time? Definitely (Anil) Kumble. And the best batsman in the present lot? There are two guys I have enjoyed watching, Viru and Yuvraj… and Dhoni. 2s8lrwj.jpg The best captain you have played under? I think two, Sourav and Dhoni. aay9eb.jpg Why these two, what were their special skills? I liked the way Sourav handled the team. I liked the way he would mix around with the team. As for Dhoni, his thought processes and mine are the same. Whatever I would have done, he is pretty close to my thinking. Finally, is there any crisis you faced or something you now feel you could have avoided? No, I don’t think so. There are absolutely no regrets. I might have made mistakes while playing — like had I known I would get out while playing a certain shot, I would not have not done it. But no, I have no regrets as such. vd04zq.jpg DID YOU KNOW He once challenged Kambli to run around the boarding house (at a junior event) with nothing but a towel on. Kambli completed the task. THOSE GOLDEN YEARS 2000 Reaches his 25th ODI ton by ODI ton by scoring 122 vs South Africa at Baroda on March 17. 2001 Becomes the first batsman in the history of ODI cricket to score 10,000 runs. 2002 Equals Bradman's record of 29 Test centuries with 117 against the West Indies. 2003 Scores 673 during the World Cup and becomes the highest run-getter in the tournament. 21jrk07.jpgxf82sk.jpg

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A Tribute by Narain Karthikeyan 64hyli.jpg SHARED LOVE FOR SPEED & ADVICE FROM THE BEST Iwas surprised to realise that Sachin is one of those guys who comes up to you and asks for advice if he feels you know better. This was at a karting track in Mumbai a couple of years ago. s13.jpg He was suffering from a tennis elbow injury and chose to drive with a single hand on the wheel. Still, he was really fast and his control over the kart was better than the instructors. There is a certain smoothness in his driving which made me realise what a gifted athlete he is. For regular people it takes a long time to master a car, let alone a kart. We share a love for speed and Sachin has been very supportive over the years. When I was driving for Jordan in 2005, I was plagued with media requests and my managers were insisting that I interact as much as possible. It was all getting to be a bit too much. That year Sachin came to at least three races. He told me to concentrate on the job and forget about the media. As a man who's handled media pressure for so long, his words were a welcome balm. Thereafter I would withdraw from media interactions if they conflicted with my schedule free of any guilt. After all, I had been advised by the best. (Karthikeyan, India's only F1 driver, spoke to Sukhwant Basra) A Tribute by K Srikanth 24vntj4.jpg `I will take care of it' We first heard about this boy from Bombay in late 1988. Dilip Vengsarkar was captain of Bombay and India and he spoke highly of him. Ironically, when it came to picking the team for the 1989 Pakistan tour, it was Vengsarkar who Tendulkar replaced, but by then the 16-year-old had scored tons on debut in Ranji, Duleep and Irani matches. When we went to Pakistan, and I led the team, my job was to give the youngsters some confidence. One of the first things I did was to tell Sachin that he would play all four Tests, irrespective of what he scored. I remember Sachin's brother was on that tour and I spoke to him separately, asking him to give his brother the confidence he needed. e9ahoo.jpg But really, even though Sachin was shy and reserved, he already had confidence in himself. Just as his back-foot play was assured and precise, he was also a very composed individual. The incident I remember most fondly happened when Sachin took apart Abdul Qadir in an unofficial game. We needed eight an over and when Sachin started hitting Qadir for sixes against the spin I, as the senior player, walked down the pitch to tell him to take it easy. He just waved and sent me back, as if to say, `I know what I'm doing. I'll take care of it.' And he has done that with Indian cricket over the last 20 years. (Srikkanth, who was Sachin's first Test captain, is currently chairman of selectors, spoke to Anand Vasu)

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INTERVIEW/SACHIN TENDULKAR Marathon man Sachin Tendulkar has been on the road for 20 years, but still loves to carry on. “There is nothing like playing cricket. I like to play matches all season,” he says in a chat with Vijay Lokapally. S. SUBRAMANIUM 20091114501300901.jpg (If I had not become a cricketer) maybe, I would have become a tennis player. Maybe, I would have won a Grand Slam.’ It was a journey that began on a humble note with an innings of 15 in his debut Test in Karachi in November 1989. And today, Sachin Tendulkar is ranked among the all-time greats of the game, having amassed 12,773 runs in 159 Tests and 17,178 runs from 436 ODIs (up to the India-Australia match in Guwahati on November 8, 2009). He continues to grow and promises much more. The legend gets up close with Sportstar. Excerpts from the interview: Question: Have you ever had the fear of losing your place in the Indian team? Answer: Honestly, I have never had this fear. I have never had this feeling that I could lose my place in the team, not even when I was playing junior cricket. Don’t you get tired of playing so much cricket? Why should I? There is nothing like playing cricket. I like to play matches all season. Of course — I have said this earlier too — we must have time to unwind, spend time with the family, recharge our energies and come back and play and with the same passion. Have you ever experienced days when nothing worked for you? Yes, quite a few. It is human. You go through such things many times in your life — you are dying to get something, but you don’t. It happens to everyone. It is part and parcel of life. Every time the team does not win, it is a bad day. Which are the good days? Every time the team wins. Individual delight fades before a team’s celebration. There are many innings where, even before a ball has been bowled, it so happens that you know you would click. You connect the ball as you want to and hit it where you want to. It is a great feeling when things work your way. 20091114501300902.jpg A family man... Sachin Tendulkar with his wife Anjali and son Arjun (below). How has your journey been? I have enjoyed every moment of it. The passion to play remains. Getting injured can be a part of your sporting career, but I am grateful to God that I have managed to stay fit most of the time. I take pride in having played with some wonderful cricketers. Playing for India has been a great privilege indeed. How do you control your emotions on the field? See, emotions can vary from individual to individual. I may express disappointment, but the other person may not. We must aim to do our best. The reactions can vary. It is up to individuals to learn the lessons. There are times when I feel very sad after a loss, but what can you do? Can you just stay put in your room just because you have lost? You have to plan for the next match and look to come back. That is the motivation for most players. What is your mantra for staying fresh and not losing interest in the game? ‘Enjoy on the field’ is my mantra. I go out and work as hard as I can on my game and try to get better. I never stop thinking about my responsibilities towards the team. I try to get better and perform better. The rest follows automatically. There can be no compromise on training. To me, effort and performance are important. How do you look at the expectations of the people? They seem to grow each time you walk to the crease… To me these expectations are a good sign. It is good if people have expectations from me because it only reflects their belief in me. I also want to do something. I try my best. I have my own reading and the experience to back me, and nothing pleases me more than meeting the expectations of the people. Of course, it is not possible to achieve that in every match. 20091114501300903.jpg Do you set goals for yourself before a match or a series? Yes, I do. I set goals before a season, before a match and even before an innings. I try to the best of my abilities to achieve them. I keep myself focused and also remain realistic. How meaningful are these practice sessions since you have been playing so much of cricket in the last few years? Is it true that these sessions often lack seriousness? Let me tell you that every player is serious when it comes to training. It is a misconception that they are not serious, and it is very wrong to say that they don’t concentrate during training. They do train hard; every player wants to do well. They all come for practice with an aim and eventually work hard to achieve success. They also know they cannot afford to relax because it can affect their performance. How do you approach your batting? I have a simple philosophy. I look at the ball and I never think of anything else. I know what I have to do. I have my priorities clear once the contest begins. I only focus on the ball when I have a bat in my hand. How do we protect the youngsters from burnout and also from distractions that can come with money and fame at a very young age? That’s a tricky question. I think it depends on the individual. As far as I am concerned, money and fame are part of professional cricket today but self discipline is the most valuable aspect. You can’t leave this (grooming) to a third person. Here, family guidance is important but the individual must also know how to exercise control. Only then he will get his focus right. You can’t blame someone else if you lose your balance. I can only guide a person, but ultimately it is all in his hands. In my case, my family ensured that I did not lose my balance, but then I also knew what was right and wrong. But there are cases of players giving more importance to tournaments like the Indian Premier League and Champions League and looking to play more and more T20 tournaments. How to counter this? If you are a cricketer for the last 15 years you will know that you started playing because you loved the sport, you had a passion for it and you cared about every match. Just because there is money to be earned, it does not necessarily diminish your passion for the game. They are two different aspects. I would request the youngsters to stay humble. This is the basic rule for stars or superstars. I keep telling the young ones that they must remember the great deeds of our past cricketers. After all, they were the ones who showed us the way. How does a batsman develop his concentration? What was your approach? Personally, nothing special. I have always tried to keep my mind simple. I have always told myself to remain positive. I watch the ball very closely, right up to the point of release. It is important to control your breathing. But to tell you the truth, I didn’t do anything special to improve my concentration. I know you can recall every dismissal of yours and also the shot with which you got each of your centuries. How do you manage to remember all of them? Not just I. I think most batsmen would remember their dismissals. Most bowlers would also remember how they got good batsmen out. I can speak for myself — yes, I can recall all of them. What about your equipment? Do you preserve your cricket gear? I do. I have each and every bat with which I have hit an international hundred. I have all the India caps that I have worn. I have every single trophy that I have won. I have kept them all carefully. I have had to work hard and make sacrifices to win them. Have you ever had dreams of being an achiever in any field other than cricket? Say, a surgeon pulling off a miracle on the operation table, a general winning a battle and so on? No. To tell you the truth, I have always looked at myself only as a cricketer. As a kid, I always wanted to play for India and ultimately achieved my dream. I do dream of making constant progress as a cricketer so that I can try and win more and more matches for India. What if you had not played cricket for India? In that case, maybe, I would have become a tennis player. Maybe, I would have won a Grand Slam (laughs). Do you advise youngsters on your own or do you prefer to be approached? I always go and tell individuals what I feel. I also remind them that it does not necessarily mean what I say has to be right. They can work on it and can get better. I tell them this is only my assessment but ultimately they have to decide. I can only share my experience with them. What was the turning point of your career? It came very early in my career. My second Test match, in Faisalabad. I was disappointed with my first Test because I thought I did not achieve what I had set out to do. I had got a chance (in Karachi) and thought I squandered it (bowled for 15 by Waqar Younis). And then, I got this one. I just decided to stay there. I told myself come what may I had to contribute. This knock (59 in the first innings) gave me immense confidence. I thought I belonged here (Test level). After the first Test, I was not sure if I belonged here. I was tense; my footwork was static and my grip shaky. I asked myself, ‘what have I done?’ And then this opportunity changed my life. I was so happy to have got that chance. What is it that you don’t like in today’s cricket? Nothing in particular, nothing as of now. But there are certain things we need to address. Like calling a no-ball. Umpires tend to miss the no-ball and sometimes it becomes crucial. Now, there are no great skills involved in picking a no-ball. But the effort is irritating for the umpire. He has to look below for over-stepping and then look ahead for an edge, lbw, bat-pad, wide… It is certainly not an easy job. We can certainly eliminate the human errors. I think laser technology can help in deciding all line decisions. Where does the umpire’s skill lie? In judging a leg-before appeal. There you need to monitor and bring in greater consistency. It is not 100% possible to get all lbw decisions correct but definitely we can come closer to getting a fair result when it comes to picking a no-ball. The third umpire has helped a lot in getting closer to perfection with regard to line decisions. Why not make it as perfect as possible by giving him the job of deciding a no-ball. It will ease the pressure on the field umpire. Are you worried about Test cricket losing its popularity? Test cricket is the ultimate cricket, and you have to keep it going. I had made an appeal to the BCCI in this regard. On the weekends of a Test match, why can’t we attract young cricket followers to the venue? We can keep a section free for 5000 young cricketers. We can bring promising cricketers from schools and colleges to fill this section. We can go a step further — we can organise a banner competition on each day of the Test match. The group that makes the best banner gets to meet the Indian team. Kids will come with banners and I know the youngsters today are very bright. This banner can be their ticket to meet the players and a huge motivation for the youngsters to come to the venue. There will be creativity in their banners and will make things lively. And this should only be for a Test match, not one-dayers or T20. I am confident the youngsters would help in reviving Test cricket if the administrators think it is dying in terms of spectator interest. Why restrict this idea to Test matches? The memory of a day at a Test match stays. I still remember my first day at a Test match (at the Wankhede Stadium) in 1983 (India-West Indies). I can never forget that day. Any more suggestions? Yes. I feel strongly about junior cricket. I have an idea that could be experimented all over India. We must have inter-school matches for the age group 14-15 and ensure that every kid gets to play. Let me explain: a kid trains for one year and the expectations of his parents grow. It is sheer passion that pushes the kid to a cricket academy. And then he gets selected to the team, but does not figure in the playing XI and his team loses the first match. The kid returns home and there is nothing for him or his parents to cheer about. And then he waits another year for his next opportunity. So, we must see that all 15 players of a team get to play. When a kid leaves his home in the morning, he is sure of playing the match and goes with that positive mindset. We have to encourage them to play. They will thus have more passion to play. Some can bat, some can bowl. They can take turns to field. It will be fair to every kid wanting to make it big. He should not suffer just because his team gets knocked out. Maybe if he gets to play he can alter the course of the match. How do you view our domestic cricket? It will not be fair on my part to comment on domestic cricket because I have hardly been playing any matches, barring a couple of Ranji matches. I am not in the best position to comment. But I keep myself informed and try and follow if someone tells me there is a good player coming up. How much has batting evolved from the time you began? It certainly has become more creative with the introduction of T20 and power play. The batsmen are prepared to take more chances. You have new shots like the scoop shot and the switch hit. It is good for the audience. There were creative batsmen earlier also and ten years down the line you may have more creative batsmen with even more different shots. The pitches have also improved all over the world. This is my opinion. The bowlers might differ on this. You had recently suggested that 50-50 matches be split into four sections of 25 overs each. What prompted you to come up with this idea? It is essentially to make them (50-overs-a-side matches) interesting and reduce the domination of the toss. Especially in Sri Lanka, the toss proves too crucial in a one-dayer because it is tough to chase since the pitch becomes slower in the second half of the match. That is not good for the game or the audience. It is so different in a place like Lahore where you can even look to chase a target of 300 because there is less swing and the ball comes straight. Then, the dew factor also makes it difficult for the bowling side in a one-dayer. How important is education in a sportsman’s life? Sportsman or not, education is important. Not everyone can be a successful sportsman, but most become successful through sound education. It is very, very important. There can’t be any compromise in this regard. You have to concentrate on education for a secure future. What if you suffer an injury and can’t play? Do you pamper your kids? I do pamper them like any father would, but not to the extent where I would spoil them. I will not tolerate nonsense. I will just not tolerate indiscipline or bad behaviour. I know they are still kids but then they should know how to behave and show respect. If they expect something from me, I also expect good manners from them. I am only expecting effort and not just good result. I don’t expect A-plus always. I don’t pressurise my children. I just tell them to give their hundred per cent. That’s what I insist upon. There is time to play, and there is time to study. I like naughty kids. I was naughty myself. After all, if they don’t make mischief then who would? My kids are taken care of well by Anjali. She is the one who works with them. We don’t punish the kids. How important is the time you spend with your family? It is special. I always look forward to it. It is great to be with them. I know where ‘Aai’ (mother) would be sitting, where ‘bhau’ (brother) would be sitting. And the kids — I have come to take them for granted; take for granted their affection for me. Each time I am away from my family, I realise the importance of my family members. I miss them so much on tours. When I come home, I know someone will be there waiting for me. I treasure every moment that I spend with them. At home, anyone can express his opinion frankly. You can say what you want, do what you want, but the respect is there, the affection is there. I love my family, my home. Have you ever been tempted to join some fans and mob someone? Mostly, you are the one who is mobbed? Not anyone in particular. I am by nature a shy person. So I don’t think I will have the courage to do that. But I would love to meet some of our freedom fighters, specially our unsung heroes. I have hundreds of questions to ask them on their experiences and the courageous decisions they took. Honestly, what they have done for us can’t be matched. And one more person I would have loved to meet is Michael Jackson. I grew up listening to him. In fact, I had booked tickets for the first day first show of his London concert. But I was not destined to meet him. You have been working a lot for the underprivileged people. How do you view the situation in India? I will continue to do as much as I can. ‘The joy of giving’ is a fantastic concept. We have so many needy people in the country. Believe me, even a donation of Rs. 5 can make a difference. We must give whatever we can to help the needy. Last year, my daughter (Sara) decided not to accept gifts on her birthday. She told her friends to bring cash and they all organised a party for the underprivileged kids. My family was extremely proud of her gesture. What aspects of our society affect you emotionally? I am moved by people’s sufferings. I wish I could change so many things in our society. What can I tell people? Actually it is for every individual to understand how he wants to contribute to the nation. It is our country; we have to care for our country. If you are a conscious citizen, I don’t think you will wait for somebody to come up with an appeal to make you understand your responsibilities. It has to come from within. What are you proud of? My integrity, my self-pride. Any regrets in life? None. I am thankful to God. I am very happy with the way I have lived my life and with whatever has come my way. I have absolutely no regrets, no complaints. I feel very humble with whatever I have. In fact, I have got more than what I expected.

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Chandan take a bow :hatsoff: I iz getting emotional :sniffle:
I still cannot believe he is actually 36 now, it's still like watching a boy in his mid 20's playing for India with the same passion and aggression. Sachin :hail: :(( (emotional)

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I still cannot believe he is actually 36 now' date=' it's still like watching a boy in his mid 20's playing for India with the same passion and aggression. Sachin :hail: :(( (emotional)[/quote'] Seems like yesterday when my dad was saying "Look at that boy, he hold a driving license, but he can murder bowlers around the world". Time really flies by so quickly.

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Seems like yesterday when my dad was saying "Look at that boy' date=' he [b']doesn't hold a driving license, but he can murder bowlers around the world". Time really flies by so quickly.
:winky:

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Amitabh Bachchan said a nice thing when he was asked about the pressure on Sachin Tendulkar. He said "Sachin is a consummate artist and all such artists are gifted in handling pressure under all circumstances. Indeed, I believe if there were to be no pressure in an artist’s life, his best would never emerge."

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Amitabh Bachchan on Tendulkar. Interviewed published on 12th Nov.

They are the biggest two icons of the country; they are also unabashed admirers of each other. Amitabh Bachchan Speaks About Sachin Tendulkar’s Genius In This TOI Exclusive... Ajay Naidu | TNN TOI: Sachin Tendulkar is going to complete 20 years in international cricket. Your reactions on this awesome feat by the little great man of Indian cricket... AB: Incredible! It is a marvel that a sportsman can have such an extended, achievement-filled life. His recent performance (referring to Sachin’s 175 in Hyderabad) was better than all those much younger than him. He is a true genius! TOI: How does it feel to know that despite being an icon himself, Tendulkar has been a huge fan of yours since he was a kid? AB: I am so, so humbled by this fact. It is Sachin’s greatness that he should consider me to be capable of his affection and love. TOI: What is it that you admire about Sachin’s batting? AB: It is the absolute confidence his stance exudes, and the imperious manner in which he dismisses each delivery. All his strokes are poetry in motion but, for me, his punched off-drive is breathtaking. TOI: You are a legend yourself and have been in the limelight for so many years now. Do you appreciate the way Tendulkar has handled pressure, both on and off the field? AB: I am no legend, but Sachin is a consummate artist and all such artists are gifted in handling pressure under all circumstances. Indeed, I believe if there were to be no pressure in an artist’s life, his best would never emerge. TOI: Have you ever delayed a shoot, or postponed an appointment, just because Tendulkar was going great guns during a match? AB: Yes, innumerable times! TOI: When Tendulkar is playing well, he puts a smile on a billion faces. Suddenly, people everywhere seem to be more accomodating and friendly, and even the cashier at the bank serves you with a smile! Have you experienced similar feel-good vibes at your shoots? AB: There is an atmosphere of positivity when Sachin is doing well and, at shoots, there is a constant, uplifting buzz. TOI: Talk us through some of the innings you cherish... AB: Look at his record! Do you really think anyone has the capacity to talk through his best innings? As far as I am concerned, they have all been the best. TOI: When did you first meet Sachin and what was your first impression about him? AB: I cannot remember when exactly I first met him. But I do remember that from the day I met him to this day, he has remained the same humble, quiet and shy person, one who almost wishes that he could avoid all the attention he gets in public. TOI: Tendulkar has appeared on Kaun Banega Crorepati and also featured in a few commercials with you. What was the chemistry like during those shoots? AB: There was instant rapport between us and he was clinically correct in the execution of whatever he took up. TOI: Facing controversy is part of being a celebrity. Do you sometimes wonder how someone like Tendulkar has managed to stay away from controversies despite being under the microscope for two decades? AB: It is the able manner in which he conducts himself in public and private that has made him what he is today. It requires great restraint and mental rectitude to achieve that. It is not easy to remain unaffected and aloof from controversy, but Sachin has always exercised the qualities most achievers do: he has remained patient and allowed his bat to do the talking. When his bat talks, controversy — right or wrong — can take a walk. TOI: Apart from his batting, what are the qualities you admire in Tendulkar? AB: His gentle, unobtrusive manner. TOI: Besides yourself, who else in your family is a Tendulkar fan? AB: Everyone in my family is a huge Tendulkar fan. TOI: Like in your case, age appears to be just a number for Tendulkar. Retirement seems far off... AB: Do not compare or put Sachin in the same class as me. May he continue to be with us, in our team, and be our inspiration forever. At a public function for the promotion of his film, Aamir Khan made a very pertinent remark. He said despite the fact that they know they are the best, Lata Mangeshkar and Sachin Tendulkar have never been heard saying so themselves. I would look at this remark in two ways. 1. Those who think they are the best, need to keep saying it because others do not. 2. Those who know they are the best do not need to say it because others say it! So if they are not saying they are the best, it probably means they still believe there is room for improvement. That’s the true mark of a master.
Source: http://epaper.timesofindia.com/Default/Scripting/ArticleWin.asp?From=Archive&Source=Page&Skin=pastissues2&BaseHref=TOIM/2009/11/12&PageLabel=32&EntityId=Ar03200&ViewMode=HTML&GZ=T

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Sachin wanted to know about my last shot: Bindra I don't think I'm a cricket fan. How can I be? All my life, I've only been interested in watching Sachin Tendulkar, and none of the other Indian batsmen. Every time he gets out, I turn off my TV, deeming it unworthy to watch anything else after that. Does that mean I'm not a true follower? I don't know. Is it possible to not follow cricket and still have Tendulkar as an idol? I don't know but I've done exactly that. It was during the 1996 World Cup in India that I began to follow the game, or should I say Tendulkar. I got hooked to his game for the extra grace, for the aggression that he brought to the field. Of course, over the years, Tendulkar has transformed his game. To last this long, he had to cut off a lot of shots. It was a brave move, considering all the public expectations. But he managed and got into that frame of mind. Now again, it seems like he's turning a corner. He looks more relaxed, he's playing more freely. I know people have these big Sachin scores (like the famous one in Sharjah) as their favourites but funnily for me, it was the 40-odd that he made against the West Indies in West Indies (44 in Trinidad in 1997, against an attack comprising Ambrose, Walsh and Bishop) which I like the most. The pitch was difficult, the sky was overcast, the ball was swinging and all the other Indian batsmen were just falling apart. Tendulkar played with such ease. It showed why he is so special and that's why there are such silly expectations when it comes to him. Although I don't know him personally but from a distance, it looks as if Tendulkar lives in a bubble. Otherwise, how do you explain the years he has been able to play without getting affected? To add to that, there were numerous surgeries. It must have been a steep ask, I'm sure, to sustain the hunger. I first met Tendulkar during the 1998 Kuala Lumpur Commonwealth Games for only a brief moment, when I was participating as a 13-year-old. Someone clicked a photo of us and I ensured that I had it. I came back and put it up in my room, hoping that I would have more such classic encounters. My wish was fulfilled last Monday, when I met him during an award ceremony, after 11 long years. We spoke general stuff - about our earlier meeting and a common fraud trainer we were being conned by! He then asked me about my last shot, which fetched India the Olympic gold. I became his fan, anew, that evening.

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Lata Mangeshkar on Sachin. Interview published on 13 Nov, 2009.

I would like to honour Sachin with a 'Vishwa Ratna: Lata Mangeshkar TOI: Like yourself, there seems to be no limit to Tendulkar's genius too. The entire country is celebrating his 20th year in international cricket. How do you look at this monumental achievement? LATA: My heartiest congratulations to him. I have seen Sachin right from the time he made his debut as a sixteen-year-old. Since then, he has gone on to climb dizzy heights, he's got married, raised a family, and somehow remained the same humble man throughout. It's really amazing to know he has been around for 20 years. I greet him and his family. May God bless him and may he go on for another 40 years! TOI:You have been an ardent admirer of the game, from Sunil Gavaskar to Sachin. What do you like about Tendulkar when he graces the crease? LATA: Like Sunil Gavaskar, there's a comforting thought that Sachin will hold the fort, that Team India is safe. Though each stroke is a stroke of genius, I have a distinct liking for his straight drive. I also admire the way he looks up to the heavens every time he completes a half-century or century. It means he is thanking God for blessing him, and that's a great thing. Who can forget the 1999 World Cup, when he played on even though his father passed away midway through the tournament? Sachin took a break to attend the funeral and returned quickly to score a century, then looked up to the skies to seek his father's blessings. It was a very touching and emotional moment for every Indian. The poignancy of that moment has stayed in the minds of all who watched that knock. I am no exception. TOI: If you were asked to play favourites between Sunil Gavaskar and Sachin, who would you pick? LATA: To be honest, it's difficult to pick one. They played in different eras and both brought laurels to the country. Sunil had his own distinct style while Sachin is in a class of his own. Both are legends in their own right. Having said that, I think Sunil retired a bit early. And what else can I say about Sachin? The fact that Don Bradman, the greatest batsman ever, was reminded of himself while watching Sachin bat is the best tribute he can ever get. TOI: Talk us through your first meeting with Tendulkar... LATA: Although I don't remember the first time, I remember having met him once at Raj Thackeray's residence. That was on his birthday, on the 24th of April, which incidentally is also my father's death anniversary. I got a call from Raj requesting me to come over to meet Sachin. Since it was his birthday, I asked Raj what gift I could get for the young batsman. I remember we all sat outside, chatting. I presented Sachin with an idol of Sai Baba. As I did that, Sachin touched my feet and said, 'you are like my mother'. Usne mujhe maa ka darja diya. I was really moved. TOI: He is passionate about your singing, and that of Kishore Kumar's.. LATA: I know he likes to hear my songs and I feel humbled. He has also been to a couple of my concerts. But he never came up to me to say, 'I am here.' That's his greatness. In fact, I didn't notice him the first time he was there to watch me sing. The next time he came with his wife. I think it was in Mumbai or Pune. My brother Hridaynath Mangeshkar informed me that Sachin was in the audience. Then I noticed him and said 'namaste' from the stage. What I really like about Sachin is that despite being a great player, he is so humble and down to earth. I know he has broken so many records, done the country proud and won so many awards. For doing all that and still conducting himself respectfully all along, I think, he deserves a Bharat Ratna. Why just a Bharat Ratna, I would like to honour Sachin with a 'Vishwa Ratna'!
Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/cricket/interviews/I-would-like-to-honour-Sachin-with-a-Vishwa-Ratna-Lata-Mangeshkar/articleshow/5224542.cms

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I feel nervous while starting every new innings: Tendulkar MUMBAI: Even after grabbing virtually every batting record in his illustrious 20-year career, Indian batting icon Sachin Tendulkar says he still feels 'nervous' when he walks down to bat. "I believe feeling nervous enables one to give his best. You can get nervous only when you care about something and I care about cricket," Tendulkar said while speaking at a felicitation function for batting legends Sunil Gavaskar and Gundappa Viswanath on Thursday. It was an evening of nostalgia and a walk down memory lane as four legends - Gavaskar, Viswanath, Tendulkar and Amitabh Bachchan - shared the dais. The four celebrities enthralled the audience with interesting anecdotes as hordes of photographers captured the rare moment of these four legends being together on stage. Tendulkar spoke about how his idol Gavaskar personally came to greet him after he broke his record of 34 centuries. and said it was indeed a touching moment to see Gavaskar waiting for him. "There is not a bigger thing than getting recognised from the person you adore. He advised me not to stop and carry on. I am trying to follow his advise," Tendulkar, the highest run-getter in both Test and One-day formats, said. Tendulkar also spoke about how Gavaskar wrote a letter to him in his school days in 1987 after he had failed to win the best junior cricketer of the year award. "I was very disappointed not to win the award. That's when I got a letter from him. That letter was more valuable to me than the award itself." "During the 1987 World Cup when I was a ball boy at the Wankhede stadium, I remember him (Gavaskar) calling me to the dressing room and introducing me to the entire team. I was too stunned and hardly spoke during the entire day," he added. Gavaskar said that if he was reborn, he would like to be a fast bowler and give it back to all those who had hurled bouncers at him. Viswanath also kept the audience spellbound with his witty and humorous stories about his playing days and how he had struck a friendship with Gavaskar which is still going strong. "We have had some wonderful partnership on the cricket field but our partnership in life has been going strong and I hope it will continue to remain so," Viswanath said. The felicitation was organised by Trikitadah, a musical group.
Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/cricket/top-stories/I-feel-nervous-while-starting-a-new-innings-Tendulkar/articleshow/5224121.cms

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[ame=

sachin tendulkar 193 vs england part 1[/ame] [ame=
sachin tendulkar 193 vs england part 2[/ame]

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