Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Chandan

Celebrating Sachin Tendulkar's 20 glorious years [Update: 28th year]

Recommended Posts

Youngsters have trouble in understanding the reason why Sachin is so admired by Indians. The stats don’t tell them the story, they find weaknesses, glitches, mistakes in them. The stats make him look good but is that all there is to Sachin? I have been following him ever since I was hooked by his performance in the an exhibition 20/20 between Pak and India. With Sachin it was not only about his batting. I won’t be wrong if I say that he is THE most famous and well known cricketer in the world ever. Kids look up to him even in third world countries. Only Sachin could have done an AD for milk in Saudi Arabia where there is no cricket. He has been the face of cricket for a long time, he was the one who brought money to cricket and big sponsorship deals. He made Indians watch cricket and this was the beginning of BCCI being rich. He was a major factor in propagating ODI cricket in India. Big media houses and companies started their interest in cricket because of him. He was the First big and the greatest cricket icon. Bradman was revered but Sachin was a real cricket celebrity. In a poll conducted in 98, only 40% of people in India (particularly rural) knew Vajpayee(the then Prime Minister) but 99% knew about Sachin. He was above Mahatma Gandhi in the popularity charts. Even ones without access to TV/newspapers knew about Sachin and when their children bunked studies to play, would say “Sachin samjha hai kya khud ko?” He was a revolution in cricket. In the late 80s cricket was a snobbish game in India watched by intellectuals in a group in one’s drawing room. By the late 90s, and 2000s common labourers on the street left their jobs in which they were payed by the hour to stand and stare at TV screens in a showroom window or stay glued to the radio (remember AakashVaani?) till the time he was at the crease. Never before had one man brought such hopes to a whole nation. India was rife in corruption. Rajiv Gandhi was killed. Sycophancy was everywhere. Bribe was the way of life. People had given up hope of India achieving much as a nation. Sachin was that bright ray which made people forget for a while their day to day trouble. Unlike today when we have the luxury, Sachin was never cursed even when he failed. Who curses their idol? It was always the other players, umpires, the world. Every four/six from his bat was a victory in itself. We enjoyed him making great bowlers look ordinary, though at the other end the procession had started and we probably lost by an innings. The result was never discussed, that was something un-necessary. People watched cricket for Sachin and not the other way around. TVs where switched off as soon as he was out. If India batted second, the TV would be given a ‘rest’(a very Indian phrase) till the big event. We would have time to finish off our pending work before Sachin came to open. Every praise which a contempory player/ex-player sang about Sachin made the blood rush to our face as if the compliment was meant for us and the whole country. Through it all his humble demeanor elevated him to legendary status which no brashness or arrogance would have achieved. Stats do not tell the whole picture always. Society has become result oriented now. For us, the journey was worth the experience. A lost match was just like a great Bollywood movie with a sad end where the hero died saving everyone. Despite his defeat, he still remained for us, a hero. Sachin Tendulkar is much more than mere stats. For a long time he carried the mantle of a billion hopes successfully, he provided them a few moments of relief from their wretched life, all this while remaining the same humble chap from Mumbai. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- An old article I had written here

Share this post


Link to post
Youngsters have trouble in understanding the reason why Sachin is so admired by Indians. The stats don’t tell them the story, they find weaknesses, glitches, mistakes in them. The stats make him look good but is that all there is to Sachin? I have been following him ever since I was hooked by his performance in the an exhibition 20/20 between Pak and India. With Sachin it was not only about his batting. I won’t be wrong if I say that he is THE most famous and well known cricketer in the world ever. Kids look up to him even in third world countries. Only Sachin could have done an AD for milk in Saudi Arabia where there is no cricket. He has been the face of cricket for a long time, he was the one who brought money to cricket and big sponsorship deals. He made Indians watch cricket and this was the beginning of BCCI being rich. He was a major factor in propagating ODI cricket in India. Big media houses and companies started their interest in cricket because of him. He was the First big and the greatest cricket icon. Bradman was revered but Sachin was a real cricket celebrity. In a poll conducted in 98, only 40% of people in India (particularly rural) knew Vajpayee(the then Prime Minister) but 99% knew about Sachin. He was above Mahatma Gandhi in the popularity charts. Even ones without access to TV/newspapers knew about Sachin and when their children bunked studies to play, would say “Sachin samjha hai kya khud ko?†He was a revolution in cricket. In the late 80s cricket was a snobbish game in India watched by intellectuals in a group in one’s drawing room. By the late 90s, and 2000s common labourers on the street left their jobs in which they were payed by the hour to stand and stare at TV screens in a showroom window or stay glued to the radio (remember AakashVaani?) till the time he was at the crease. Never before had one man brought such hopes to a whole nation. India was rife in corruption. Rajiv Gandhi was killed. Sycophancy was everywhere. Bribe was the way of life. People had given up hope of India achieving much as a nation. Sachin was that bright ray which made people forget for a while their day to day trouble. Unlike today when we have the luxury, Sachin was never cursed even when he failed. Who curses their idol? It was always the other players, umpires, the world. Every four/six from his bat was a victory in itself. We enjoyed him making great bowlers look ordinary, though at the other end the procession had started and we probably lost by an innings. The result was never discussed, that was something un-necessary. People watched cricket for Sachin and not the other way around. TVs where switched off as soon as he was out. If India batted second, the TV would be given a ‘rest’(a very Indian phrase) till the big event. We would have time to finish off our pending work before Sachin came to open. Every praise which a contempory player/ex-player sang about Sachin made the blood rush to our face as if the compliment was meant for us and the whole country. Through it all his humble demeanor elevated him to legendary status which no brashness or arrogance would have achieved. Stats do not tell the whole picture always. Society has become result oriented now. For us, the journey was worth the experience. A lost match was just like a great Bollywood movie with a sad end where the hero died saving everyone. Despite his defeat, he still remained for us, a hero. Sachin Tendulkar is much more than mere stats. For a long time he carried the mantle of a billion hopes successfully, he provided them a few moments of relief from their wretched life, all this while remaining the same humble chap from Mumbai. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- An old article I had written here
Well said. No amount of pouring over stats will uncover the the hero that was Tendulkar.

Share this post


Link to post

The great Tendulkar on star cricket Star Cricket is showing a program called The Great Tendulkar hosted by Alan Wilkins. They have been showing some of his gems from both formats non stop one after another. It's been a real treat. Anyone finds a rerun of this, do make sure to record.

Share this post


Link to post

Sorry, I was just too occupied watching it to get up and switch on the lappy. They just said there is a special program on Sachin on Sunday. I will note the time next time it comes.

Share this post


Link to post
I looked through the list of videos for The Great Tendulkar' date=' most of them were already shown in a series called Tendulkar's Tons, so I have most of them already :P[/quote'] Then start uploading. What are you waiting for?

Share this post


Link to post
Then start uploading. What are you waiting for?
I've already uploaded a few in the past. Which ones do you want? I dont have EP 2 – Eng vs. Ind, 1st Test @ Edgbaston (122) ,1996 June Ep 5 – Ind vs. Pak @ Hobart, 7th Match (93), 2000 EP 7 – Srl vs. Ind @ Bristol ,9th Match (113), 2002

Share this post


Link to post
I looked through the list of videos for The Great Tendulkar' date=' most of them were already shown in a series called Tendulkar's Tons, so I have most of them already :P[/quote'] Yeah...they have showed all of those innings' in the past. ESS had television rights of matches played in India between 1993-97 and dunno why they aren't showing any of Sachin's great knocks during that period. Also they haven't showed anything from India's tours to WI and SAF.

Share this post


Link to post

OK I got a reply back from one of the cappers who said Star Cricket are extremely strict about their copyrighted material and he's not willing to take the risk by capping and uploading. So I guess it won't be capped :((

Share this post


Link to post
I've already uploaded a few in the past. Which ones do you want? I dont have EP 2 – Eng vs. Ind, 1st Test @ Edgbaston (122) ,1996 June Ep 5 – Ind vs. Pak @ Hobart, 7th Match (93), 2000 EP 7 – Srl vs. Ind @ Bristol ,9th Match (113), 2002
Sachinsm, please upload the 241* at Sydney and the 136 at Chennai :pray: I had both of them in my hard disk which crashed recently :(( I have managed to find all the others again except these two.

Share this post


Link to post

A genius and a gentleman - By John Wright

If around 1990, I'd been asked how long this 16-year-old Indian touring New Zealand would survive in international cricket, I wouldn't have come close. No matter how good the kid looked, you didn't think in terms of a 20 years. When Sachin came to New Zealand in 1990 we had heard about this bright, young batsman. When we saw him, his talent and approach were obvious. He looked younger than he was, but he walked to the wicket like he meant it, meant the business. There was, even then, nothing excess in his game. When you can see someone's game and it will tell you about what they can do. A brilliant bat tells you he can reel off the flashy strokes but he doesn't tell you immediately if he is going to be an opponent, a real competitor. Longevity in cricket is a hard thing to predict and it's an even harder thing to achieve. You need be physically resilient and have a love for the game. It sounds simple but it is very hard work and it is what Sachin has done. By 1990, I'd played a lot of cricket and he was just starting out. Sachin had a quiet first Test in Christchurch but in Napier, gave us a long good look at himself and in terms of his skill, he was the real deal. Every time some young talent came through you wanted to see what they were all about. To see maybe what the future looked like. With Sachin, there were two things that caught your eye. He had great balance and had the time to play his shots. You saw one shot of brilliance, that for normal batsmen would not be their first shot of selection. His late cut comes to mind, and it was like something rang in your head like being woken by your alarm and you knew you were watching someone special. He played these lovely shots and but there were no frills in his cricket. I remember the innings of 88 he played in Napier, not because I took a catch but about one I dropped. A sitter from Azharuddin, that my grandmother would have caught while knitting. Azza was then given not out to one I thought he'd gloved to leg gully and I was angry with myself. In the middle of all this the16-year-old was knocking us around, and I went up to umpire Steve Woodward and told him that he'd given Azza an extra round. To which, Woodward said, "John, yours was easier than mine!" Sachin wouldn't remember all that, I don't think. The only thing about thatmatch he would remember is falling 12 short of being the youngest Test centurion. He was shy then and we didn't get a chance to exchange much other than handshakes. But in 1998-99 when he toured New Zealand, he had become something of a star and I was struck by his humility when he signed an autograph for my young son Harry. He carried himself with a lot of grace and dignity. Just how much I realised only later when coaching with India. We went to an Adidas store in Chennai and a huge crowd of what looked a thousand people gathered outside in no time at all because Sachin was there. We had to actually escape from a back entrance. Apart from things like that-which happened often, and they threw me off but he always managed to stay calm-coaching Sachin was about watching closely and asking questions. He has the best balance of any player I have ever seen. I got enjoyment out of watching him play a forward defensive shot of complete poise and control. He makes batting, which can be quite tough to master and improve, look simple. On times when I thought maybe his head wasn't quite as still as it could be, Iwould ask him howhe felt about his batting. If he said he felt great, you just left your observation alone for a while. If however he said, 'oh I don't feel that good', then you'd ask, do you think you were really balanced out there, how's the head you think? He was in many ways his own coach, and he had his brother who knew his game inside out. For the rest of it, he was just a young man with an enormous love of his game and gave it complete respect both in preparation and in practice. He worked at it, not like one of the contemporary greats of the game which is who he was, but like a student. I knew he was upset in Multan after that declaration and it was understandable but he got over it almost that very night. He was never late for the bus, for practice, for meetings. On one day he knew he was going to be, so he came up to me and said there was something that had to be attended. I just thought that's why he was who he was. I wish a lot of lesser players could learn from his thoughtfulness and the respect he showed, not just for me as the coach but for his cricket, what we were all trying to to, what we were all trying to be part of. He was a very tough but fair competitor and he had great humanity. In 2003, we were in New Zealand on what was a horrible tour for the team. For me, it was worse because I had taken the team I coached back to my home country and we weren't playing likewe could. It was an awful time to be honest. By the time we came to Queenstown, I was feeling particularly beat-up. Sachin was living in the room next to mine, and one evening he came over with a bottle of wine and tried to make me feel better. We just talked about how the tour had gone and how the team knew that it would have been a very bitter pill to swallow. Well, my face certainly showed that evening and at the time I appreciated his thoughtfulness. Sachin and I have always had some interesting conversations about batting and I remember one in Sydney 2003-04 along with his wife Anjali. Sachin had not got a big score on the tour by his standards and Sydney was to be the last test. Eventually he made a plan that he would not play the backfoot drive squarish through the off-side until he really got in. He then got 241 not out without a cover drive. Some pundits called it scratchy, and grumbled that he was not the same Tendulkar and I thought that was rubbish. That innings was not about showing off his repertoire for a couple of hours to keep the crowd happy, that was just another piece of Tendulkar genius, of being able to control the mental side of his game and the big runs. I lost count of the number of times commentators and the like used to say he's on the wane, he's not same player he was. To them Iwanted to say, "just look in the scorebook". Today I want to ask them, he's been a long time waning, hasn't he? Given his huge popularity, Sachin could have taken on the superstar life but he just loved the game and he was determined to succeed. This determination really doesn't get talked about by writers and commentators. Sometimes he could go into himself, which may look like aloofness at a distance, but I always thought it was something that came from who he was. Or maybe something it was someone he needed to be because of his life. This genuine genius of a performer at the crease was actually just a normal man who strangely enough couldn't walk down the street outside his home. One of the people in cricket Sachin reminds me of most is Shane Warne. They come from two different parts of the world, one of them's a batsman, the other a bowler, one man smokes and the other doesn't and let's not even gointo the difference in the kind of headlines they generate. What brings them together, though, and actually makes them friends is complete understanding and control over their craft. Theirs is a highly developed and matured skill, which you don't find everywhere and which comes once in a few generations and in time to come whenever the game is talked about they will be forever remembered. After Sachin got a big score a few years ago, and it may have been a 200 against Zimbabwe, I did bring up the figure of a 100 hundreds. It wasn't about sowing a seed, I just thought back then, that he could do it if he wanted to. He's close now and I'm keeping count. Getting to that milestone would put Sachin alongside Bradman who really rated him. A hundred hundreds would be a number like Bradman's famous average, a record that only a history-maker could set. Normally you would have thought there was Bradman and the rest. Now I think, Sachin comes somewhere in between Bradman and the rest. History may put them very close, maybe on the same shelf.
http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/Story/111354/a-genius-and-a-gentleman.html?page=0

Share this post


Link to post

The real Mr. Cricket - By Javagal Srinath

It was a chilly winter morning in 1989. The Karnataka team was alighting at the porch of the Patiala cricket ground to face Bombay in the quarterfinals of the Wills Trophy, at that time the premier domestic one-day tournament. Suddenly we heard cries from the back benchers of our bus, "Hey that must be Kambli…". "No, no HE is Sachin." That was my first glimpse of the famous Bombay duo of Sachin Tendulkar and Vinod Kambli. In fact at that time it was Kambli who was the more conspicuous of the two, with his flashy attire and overwhelming enthusiasm. Even before the match began, and definitely while it was on, it was amply clear to all of us that these twowere treated as the two "special" Bombay boys, even by the established seniors, Dilip Vengsarkar and Ravi Shastri. Without a doubt they were the cynosure of all eyes in the match. Kambli played a bigger role in sealing a win for the Bombay team and Sachin was just impressive with his batting technique. Eighteen months down the line, I found myself sharing the same dressing room with the boywho was to become the Little Master. Always in the company of Sanjay Manjrekar, it appeared as if Manjrekar had been given the duty of grooming this prodigy and making him at home. Sachin somehow remained by himself. He did not belong to the group of rookies like us and at the same time kept a measured distance from the seniors like Kapil Dev, Vengsarkar and Srikkanth. That year, in the season of 1991-92, he produced two 100s-one at the world's fastest wicket, the Perth WACA, and the other against Allan Donald and co, the fastest bowler in the world. It was a stunning statement of intent and arrival. I can still vividly remember the crack on the Perth wicket from where the ball was deviating dangerously off the track. The rest of the Indian batsmen struggled for survival at the centre and Sachin stood tall not just negotiating the awkward bounce but belting the bowlers disdainfully. Under the shadow of Sachin, it honestly looked as if the batsmen at the other end had been sent into oblivion. The common chorus that often rang in the dressing room was, "why can't he give the strike to Sachin"? On many other occasions, and the fans will remember this, if Sachin was dismissed, it seemed to us as if the match was over. It was his extraordinary brilliance which led to what I could only think of as the diminishing value for the other performers around him. Sachin's dismissal often brought back the lost confidence of the opposing bowlers; there was a spring in their step, suddenly all the fielders perked up. Their attack looked more penetrative, the wicket looked more difficult to bat on. That's how it affected our own team. After a run of very successful seasons in international cricket, he was put in charge of the team. It was obvious to us that the crown of captaincy did not fit him perfectly. Under Sachin's leadership for the first time in 1996, many of us found it difficult to match his expectations. His demands and anticipation of his teammates' performances originated from his own talent. Lesser mortals found the going tough even to understand their roles, never mind the whole business of taking on the pressure of international cricket. Everytime he was in charge, a curious pattern of a slump in form followed. To others it may not have been a slump, but by his standards it was. Sachin took some time to realise that it's not practical to expect others to emulate his feats. Basically, his talent was inborn and those skills cannot be acquired or transferred to anyone. The loss of any game under him his captaincy worked him up so much that it preyed on his batting abilities. The genius then realised very soon that detaching from the top seat was the way forward in his career. Unlike many other captains who stand down, the fact that Sachin was not leading the team made no difference. Players knew very soon who the true leader was in the dressing room and on the field. Things changed in the late 1990s with emergence of Rahul Dravid, Sourav Ganguly and then shortly after that, Virender Sehwag. The reliance on Sachin lessened, but the importance of his presence in the side remains. Today, that presence could best be described as an ancient cricketer whose legendary skills are still on display and are still contemporary.People wonder whatkeeps him going even today.The runs, records, wins and accolades under his belt can weigh anybody down with a great sinking sense of achievement. Once an athlete achieves what he dreams of, he asks himself the next question, "What do I do now?" It is like Sachin has always known and he is the kind of sportsman whom sports psychologists and pundits want to analyse constantly to discover the answers for sustained motivation. While his achievements are both weighty and numerous, he could have been bogged down by many things-the pain, expectations, disappointments, pressure. Adulation and public stress caused by the media are two sides of the same coin in Indian cricket. The constant media glare and public attention imposes high discipline and demands great sacrifices of cricketers in their personal life too. It can often give rise to the dark side of sportsmen of the highest calibre. As far as I know, this exemplary cricketer has no dark side to worry about. To spend more than two decades under the glare of a focused spotlight and to steer clear of any controversy is, frankly, twice as tough as scoring tens of thousand of runs. He has faced a different set of problems, particularly the longer he has played. Injuries, the fatigue syndrome and loss of form can make a cricketer, even of the most immense achievements, run into a wall. During such tough times, Sachin has always said that his brother Ajit has been the source of strength and a sounding board. But many close to him know for a fact that Sachin wages his own battles within, before making some adjustments and bouncing back stronger. I believe his response has much to do with his very strong nuclear family upbringing. Whenever doubts were raised about his future during injury layoffs, Sachin has been able to strike back with his familiar rhythm. The champion in him has defied time and age again and again. All that is what everyone sees in the public eye. As his teammate, we have shared times both good and bad and been entertained not just by his batting on the field. I have to say that it has been tough to argue with Sachin on any issue related to cricket. Be it batting or bowling (swing, spin or fast), the logic he applies is unique which is drawn from his own abilities. As a talented bowler, he can turn and spin the ball either ways. This creative of idea of swing and spin came from his hours of bowling in the nets. He is one man who is either batting or bowling in the nets all the time and he has had to be stopped from over-working himself. I knowother people have that nickname, but having played with him for more than a decade, I think of Sachin, teammate, friend, as the real Mr Cricket.
http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/Story/111356/the-real-mr-cricket.html?page=0

Share this post


Link to post

Making the singles count

Sachin Tendulkar is the complete batsman. Neither fast bowlers nor mystery spinners nor hard pitches nor damp decks nor dust bowls nor heat nor cold nor dusk nor dawn nor razzmatazz have found him wanting. Ten thousand questions have been asked and all have been answered, most of them in the affirmative. Half-a-dozen downturns have been endured and all have proved temporary. Injuries have laid him low and none has crushed him. Thirty dubious decisions have been suffered and all have been accepted. It has not only been the runs or the brilliance of their making that have set him apart. It's a mistake to regard him as an ordinary man and outstanding cricketer. There is nothing ordinary about him. He is cricket's second miracle. Durability and equanimity count amongst his strengths. His longevity and continuity tell that tale. Harmony has also been important to success. It's not just that he loves batting as another man relishes beer. Was ever a sportsman so lacking torment? Cricket has never been an ordeal to him, merely a game, his game, India's game. He has sacrificed privacy for his talent and considered it a small concession. Although India speaks loudly in his cricket-he can only be fully appreciated once its turbulence adulation and exhaustion have been taken into account -he is not an especially Indian batsman. He has soaked up local and imported, past and present, and taken the guts out of them. He is at peace with himself and has been able to absorb the influences around him. It's too easy to cast him as a genius, as if that provided the entire explanation. He is an independent and intelligent cricketer with a profound understanding of the game. Another quality can be added to the list. Tendulkar's enthusiasm for cricket is beyond quenching. Through it all he conveys pleasure, retains vitality as others wilt. Crucially he loves the game, and serves it well. How many masters can truly say that? Tendulkar is no innocent, yet there is simplicity in his batting and impishness in his manner. At the crease he looks happy, a man in his element. He does not need to goad himself. Nor can any strut be detected in him. Never mind that he dominates the statistics, is widely admired, or that his play has seldom been equalled; he still respects colleagues and foes and the game itself. He does not take liberties. It is the unchanging approach of an unchanging man. His appetite for the game is evident in the length of his career and in every innings he plays. Tendulkar's batting is illuminated but not defined byresounding drives, flicks off the pads or cuts as savage as any treasurer dare contemplate. Of course, these provide satisfaction but they are a gift from the gods. His character is revealed in another, less captivating part of his repertoire. He is a magnificent stroke player but he is also a master of the manufactured single. Sachin's singles illustrate the workings of his mind. The humble run has never been neglected. It's hard to think of another batsman of his stature as keen to tuck the ball into a gap and scurry. Of course, the bowling does not hold any fears. Just that his job is to score runs, and a single is better than a dot. Apparently Bradman sought a single off his first ball. Tendulkar is like that every ball. To watch him at the crease is to observe a batsman aware of every peril and the location of every fieldsman. Has any batsman the game has known collected as many runs with mild taps into the perennial gap behind square leg? Opponents have studied the charts and observed the tactic and still cannot stop him. Captains cannot find a man to fill the hole without weakening their defences. Bowlers suffer as their prey politely guides their best offerings into a convenient gap and trots a single. Nor is the off side is neglected. Tendulkar is as calculating player adept at opening the face of the bat and encouraging the ball to speed away behind point. Another run, another small victory, another blow landed in the enduring and cut-throat battle between bat and ball. Opponents cannot build pressure on so elusive a batsman, and cricket is a game of pressure, of canny and rash decisions taken in the hot moment. Bowlers are frustrated to find their most lethal offerings, the summation of all their knowledge, experience and power, pushed away for a simple run. What is the point? It is this ability to create runs from thin air that sets Tendulkar apart. Ordinarily stolen singles are the work of the humdrum practitioner. Tendulkar has turned them into an art form. Consider the manner of their taking, the modesty, skill and anticipation required, and then the genial dash towards the other end. Radio commentators insist they once heard him call a single before the ball had even arrived. Tendulkar is ahead of the game. Nor does he forget about anxious partners. He wants the run not to fill his own account- though like all batsmen he is mindful of that-but because it is good cricket and improves the team's position. He is not selfish. He is also a superb judge of a run. In 169 Test matches he has only been run out seven times. His partners have been caught short on 13 occasions. How many of them have been his fault? He has batted with Virender Sehwag, Sourav Ganguly and others of that ilk. Doubtless some of them were bunnies whose judgement in these matters is notoriously unreliable. Considering all the singles scampered, it is a remarkable record. Despite all the passing years and the vast tally, Tendulkar's high regard for quick singles tells of discipline, hunger and a willingness to serve. His spirit does not tolerate rebellion or ego. Throughout he has uplifted team and country with deeds. Indians scared of pace? Ask Brett Lee or Wasim Akram. Cannot score runs overseas? Check the books. Dare not defy the Australians? The deed was most thrillingly done. He was not slaying dragons or dismantling demons; he did it because he could, because he wanted to score runs and to win. Still he is there, looking fresh and alert, still a player of pedigree, still humble, still wary but then suddenly fascinating about batting. And he's not done yet. Still he is scoring hundreds, talking sense in that curiously high pitched voiced, driving the ball past the bowler or pinching a single and looking as pleased as a child who has found a plum, always he is absorbed. How many runs has be scored. Has he once appeared bored? Has he thrown his wicket away? Has he let the team down? Once? He has taken guard a thousand times for his country alone and always looked keen. Still, all good things come to an end. Fleetingness is part of it. It's the same for the players, the knowledge that soon it will be over, this childhood dream taken into adulthood, this acquaintance with excellence. Tendulkar has been around so long it's hard to imagine the game without him. Eventually another talent will appear. Let them outlast him. Let them outscore him. Let them surpass him in one formof the game let alone in three. And let them do it in India.
http://indiatoday.intoday.in/site/Story/111355/making-the-singles-count.html?page=0

Share this post


Link to post

Eighteen months down the line, I found myself sharing the same dressing room with the boywho was to become the Little Master. Always in the company of Sanjay Manjrekar, it appeared as if Manjrekar had been given the duty of grooming this prodigy and making him at home. And lookat what moron Manjrekar has been saying since he retired from the game.

Share this post


Link to post
That innings was not about showing off his repertoire for a couple of hours to keep the crowd happy, that was just another piece of Tendulkar genius, of being able to control the mental side of his game and the big runs. I lost count of the number of times commentators and the like used to say he's on the wane, he's not same player he was. To them Iwanted to say, "just look in the scorebook". Today I want to ask them, he's been a long time waning, hasn't he?
:sniffle:

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

Guest, sign in to access all features.

×