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Cricket Tragic

India vs England 2012

India vs England 2012  

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    • Yes, I feel excess money in Indian cricket system may have spoilt things
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    • No, I think money has no influence on our Test side problems
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Indian Cricket is like a high Profile Prostitute and Guys like N Srinivasan & Rajeev Shukla are its P.I.M.P's. Sadly these Bussiness Tycoon's, Politicians, who have nothing to do with this sport are exploiting Indian Cricket to fill their pockets. We need cricketers to run BCCI...Say No to Pawar's and Srinivasan's, Save Indian Cricket.

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Srini's term next September, but post that Arun Jaitley is likely to take over. Give thew horrible way DDCA has functioned under his leadership with goons running the show, I have absolutely no hopes of a change in the way BCCI works even when Srini's term ends.
So Jaitley would become the BCCI Prez just months before the next Lok Sabha election - how the hell would he find time for BCCI I do not know but I do know that Indian cricket will once again be the loser.

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What Indian Cricket Captain MS Dhoni Can Learn From Groupon CEO Andrew Mason

Indian cricket and Groupon are in a comparable state right now with Indian cricket, once champions, going through a rough patch now with a home series loss to England, and Groupon, once the fastest growing company in the history of the Internet, now struggling to get the international game right. The similarities do not end there Indian selectors are forced by public opinion to question DhoniÃÔ captaincy, and GrouponÃÔ board forced to do the same with Founder CEO Andrew Mason, by the investors and the performance of the stock. Here is one thing MS Dhoni needs to learn from Andrew Mason. In an interview with BI with rumors flying all around that the board would fire him, here is how Mason answered the toughest of questions for a CEO. Blodget asked Mason: Ÿill the board fire you tomorrow? MasonÃÔ answer: Since the stock is down 80%, ÅÊt would be weird if the board wasnÃÕ discussing if I was the right guy for the job. If I ever thought I wasnÃÕ the right person for the job, IÃÅ fire myself, Mason said. That last statement IÃÅ fire myself is what Indian cricket fans need to hear from MS Dhoni. Not because the fans want to see him go but because that will reinforce the confidence they have always had on him.
http://statspotting.com/2012/12/what-indian-cricket-captain-ms-dhoni-can-learn-from-groupon-ceo-andrew-mason/ Interesting connection! Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/andrew-mason-it-would-be-weird-if-the-board-wasnt-discussing-if-i-was-the-right-guy-for-the-job-2012-11#ixzz2FJsEGHVZ

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Indian team's and establishment's attitude to consistent losing is mind over matter. I don't mind, you don't matter. Please feel free to continue the wailing, but would you excuse me? There is a new shampoo whose product launch I have to go to.

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Captain says wc 2007 loss which nobody remembers is the worst phase and we will back jadeja as team does not get 10 overs from parttimers now.What a Mentally retard .Ranchi mental hospital bhejo koi isko.

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India v England: Too many passengers

7 Cheteshwar Pujara: A double-century, a century on a tough pitch, and a lot of promise. Young, energetic and one for the future. Good player of spin, good fielder at short leg, might need to get accustomed to carrying the Indian batting. 6.5 Pragyan Ojha: An accurate spinner. Claimed 20 wickets at an average of 30.85. Won't run through sides, but he can keep bowling at the same spot from different angles and at different trajectories and pace. For good or for bad, the best spinner India have. Umesh Yadav: The best fast bowler on either side in the only Test he played before being sidelined with an injury. Took just four wickets but genuinely troubled batsmen with pace and reverse swing. 5.5 Virat Kohli: A century in the last innings, which was a reminder of the talent and the fight, should not take away from the fact that he played loose shots to get out in the first five innings of the series. Still never gave the impression there's some place he'd rather be even as India kept losing. Will need to carry India's fielding along with Pujara. 5 Virender Sehwag: Set up the first match with a typical century, reminding that he still remains a threat when the bounce is low and the ball doesn't seam, but was disappointing in the field. Dropped Alastair Cook in Mumbai and Kevin Pietersen in Nagpur. More than the damage caused, what stood out was he was standing upright at slip not expecting a catch on either occasion. R Ashwin: Lack of patience and revolutions put on the ball a big minus, but the batting and the fight a big plus. Averaged 60.75 with the bat and 52.64 with the ball. Might not, on current form, be able to hold his place as a specialist bowler, but can be valuable as a No. 6 batsman who bowls more than just a bit. Needs to improve fielding, though. 4 Gautam Gambhir: Got off to starts, averaged 41.83, but failed to turn them into impactful innings. Clearly fighting hard, clearly putting a price on his wicket, but things not going his way. Not the sharpest in the field, and was involved in two crucial run outs. MS Dhoni: Two fighting fifties. Some special catches as a keeper. A few shockers too, especially in the first Test. Misunderstood for his demands of tracks that offer turn and bounce, regardless of the result. Still a leader of men, but not as inspiring as a tactician. Allowance needs to be made, however, for the lack of quality in the attack he manages. Ravindra Jadeja: Debuted ahead of Ajinkya Rahane, who has been waiting for a long time, under the premise that the pitch in Nagpur would turn square. That didn't happen, but Jadeja stuck to it to the best of his ability. Brought a new life to the fielding unit. Got a red-hot James Anderson when batting. Stood no chance. Sachin Tendulkar was bowled through the gate by James Anderson, India v England, 4th Test, Nagpur, 2nd day, December 14, 2012 Close to the end: Sachin Tendulkar looked awfully out of form throughout the series Ž© BCCI Enlarge 3 Piyush Chawla: Called up out of desperation despite a first-class average of over 50 this year. Took four wickets in the only Test he played. Nothing out of the ordinary, and not an answer to India's spin problems. Harbhajan Singh: Got one match on a square turner, and took just two wickets. As good or as bad as the other offspinner but got only half the overs as Ashwin, and was discarded after that. Can't complain, though: doesn't have the wickets to show. 2 Sachin Tendulkar: One of the rare long series without a century, but the third such outcome in the last 18 months. Questions over retirement kept growing. Scored one fighting fifty, but otherwise continued with his worst phase. Yuvraj Singh: Brought back after a double-century in Duleep Trophy, but - like Tendulkar - managed just one good innings out of five before being dropped. Unlike Tendulkar, wasn't great in the field. You wonder if this is the end of the Test road for one of India's most valuable limited-overs players of all time. 1 Zaheer Khan: Not long ago, one of the most crucial members of the Indian side. Led the attack like Anil Kumble did. Got four wickets in three Tests in this series. Looked like running out of puff, and listless in the field.
http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/current/story/597649.html

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India tour much easier now: Boycott

England batting legend Geoffrey Boycott feels that India are no longer the force it used to be and touring the country has become much easier now a days for cricket playing nations. Saying that Indian team is going through a transition phase, Boycott singled out a few star Indian cricketers who according to him are past their prime. Ūndians are not the force they have been in the past. Two great batsmen have retired in VVS Laxman and Rahul Dravid while Sachin Tendulkar is no longer the great player he once was, Boycott wrote in his column for The Daily Telegraph. Å©arbhajan Singh and Zaheer Khan have been fine bowlers but are past their best. You could say touring India is a bit easier now because the hotels are better, English food in the big cities is excellent and travelling is so much easier, he added. BoycottÃÔ comments came after England broke the 28-year-old jinx by defeating India 2-1 in the Test series in their own backyard after the fourth and final match ended in a draw in Nagpur on Monday. The cricketer-turned-commentator lauded the victorious Alastair Cook-led team for turning around the series in their favour after the humiliating loss in the series-opener. Ŧarlier this year we lost three Tests against Pakistan and one against Sri Lanka. We then batted appallingly in the first Test at Ahmedabad to lose by an innings. Suddenly everybody in India thought this set of England players would roll over and get beaten 4-0, Boycott said. ŵhey deserve a lot of praise for showing character, determination and ability to come back and win well in Mumbai and Calcutta.
http://www.thehindu.com/sport/cricket/india-tour-much-easier-now-boycott/article4213604.ece

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England prey on India's power Thank-you India. If England's players uttered it once after winning the Test series, they uttered it a thousand times. They took to Twitter to praise the boundless enthusiasm of the fans, they smiled at the crowds that came to greet them, they even faced the traffic jams with good grace. But they might have been thanking them for something completely different because India's perceived strengths - a thrusting economy and overwhelming cricketing muscle - has brought with it a hubris that has made it vulnerable on the cricket field. England did not just make it look as if they wanted to be in India, they knew they needed to be there. These days no international CV is complete without a successful tour of India. It is a must-have accessory for the fashionable and ambitious cricketer, a passport to potential riches, proof that they have performed in the centre of the cricketing world. It is precisely this growing prestige, as contradictory as it sounds, which has now become as much of a weakness for India as the simple fact that the team is in transition. It is off the pitch, as much as on it, that the historical context of England's victory can be found. India's economic growth is envied by many at a time of global stagnation. In the rarified world of the international cricketer, it has made it a more easeful place to be, a world of luxurious hotels possessing a service culture second to none. Debilitating stomach ailments for the foreign tourist still occur, but they are not remotely as prevalent as they once were and when they did strike England had an army of doctors and nutritionists on hand to ensure recovery in the quickest possible time. When there is the suggestion of a throwback to the old days - as Australia have proved this week by objecting to Kanpur as a venue for their forthcoming Test series because of the perceived quality of the dressing rooms and neighbouring hotels - India is now expected to deliver something better. Alongside India's economic development - in fact, to a large extent, a direct result of it - comes India's financial domination of cricket. Does it produce 70% of cricket income? For all we know it might be even more now. If those England thank-yous filter through to the owners of IPL franchises, they are not about to complain. England has been largely ignored by the most lucrative domestic tournament in cricket. Only Kevin Pietersen and Eoin Morgan are contracted to IPL clubs and one whose career was heading that way, Stuart Broad, withdrew twice because of injury and in his failure to prosper on Asian pitches has done himself no favours. Others would love to follow, surmounting the fact that their involvement must be limited because of a clash with the English season. This England victory, yes, has been a story about the composure and discipline of an impressive young captain, Alastair Cook; the flamboyance of Pietersen; the pugnacious team ethic of Matt Prior, a wicketkeeper-batsman at the height of his powers; the craft and tenacity of James Anderson in unhelpful conditions; and that rare thing in English cricket history, two world-class spin bowlers operating in tandem in Monty Panesar and Graeme Swann. But it is also about Indian hubris, borne of a pride in its gathering power. India's pride was once drawn from its rich history as one of the oldest civilisations in the world. Now it is just as likely to be drawn from its delight in its own modernity, which in some hands at least reveals itself in a more aggressive fashion. It is not an attitude which encourages faults to be found and lessons to be learned from others. How else other than Indian presumption can you explain that England have just beaten a side with such an inferior attitude to fitness and practice, or an Indian side with a coach, in Duncan Fletcher, whose authority is so compromised and who believes he should have no need to explain himself, via the media, to the public at large? India's fanatical cricket following deserves better. Back in the days, India was regarded by many England cricketers as a tour to be endured. This cultural challenge used to be one of India's strengths - automatically putting them one-up in the series before a ball had been bowled. Many touring sides have faltered for cricketing reasons, exposed on slow, dusty pitches, against great Indian batsmen and spin bowlers, but they also failed because they were debilitated by illness, fractious over travel delays, worn down by the bedlam of the cities and the absence of home comforts. Too many England players have regarded an India tour as an imposition. Too many England players failed to see the endless attractions. That way brings disaster. To win in India used to be to rise above the malcontents. Woe betide the team that kicks against the culture because as the weeks turn into months it will become weakened and ultimately defeated. Surrender to India's charms, and to flatter it in return, has always been one of the secrets of winning here. Tony Greig, tall, blond and extrovert, was immensely popular when he skippered England to victory in the mid-70s and when he needed a sidekick he won over the crowds (huge crowds, unimaginable by Cook and his victorious team-mates) by asking his resident clown, Derek Randall, to do a cartwheel on the outfield. But you do not endure a tour to a country which is now the powerhouse of the game. You go with a happy heart because as an ambitious cricketer there is nowhere more important to your career, nowhere where your stature is so high, your achievements worshipped by so many. It was not for nothing that Cook, an England captain not given to excess, ranked the victory alongside the Ashes success in Australia. England's players occasionally complained of boredom because they could not stroll around the cities in the same manner as they might do in Australia (although they would do well to try), but such grumbles should be kept in perspective. In their few leisure hours, they have their gymnasiums and swimming pools, their Xboxes and Premier League football on satellite TV, their Facebook and Twitter, their Skype calls home, their multi-cuisine restaurants. Homesickness was a more accurate description. At least if they are reduced to a good book, they no longer have to read it by the light of a 40-watt bulb. A decent light bulb was the first thing this correspondent was advised to pack in 1993 before watching Graham Gooch's England side hopelessly outplayed on a tour where chaos was a daily occurrence, an Indian airlines strike caused such disruption that it would have been no surprise to see England travel by bullock cart and where Mike Gatting's choice of prawns in a Chinese restaurant on the eve of a Test became the most infamous meal in cricket history. Those days are history now. India has modernised - and England has just thanked them for it. http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/current/story/597713.html

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Just now hard the news anchor on Aajtak say "Pune mein Team India ne liya Test series ka badla, England ko pehle T20 mein dhoya" :facepalm: This is the thinking in our media as they also know these T20s and coming ODIs matter more than the tests.

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Just now hard the news anchor on Aajtak say "Pune mein Team India ne liya Test series ka badla' date= England ko pehle T20 mein dhoya" :facepalm: This is the thinking in our media as they also know these T20s and coming ODIs matter more than the tests.
:hysterical::hysterical::hysterical:

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:haha: I wanted to see Yusuf Pathan in the team. It's just so stupid when you have two days between purity to impurity of another format. and then win handsomely to have all the indian media go berserk love it! Go Team India. BTW, the stadium was finally filled. BCCI made more money in three hours than they did in 18

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Just now hard the news anchor on Aajtak say "Pune mein Team India ne liya Test series ka badla' date= England ko pehle T20 mein dhoya" :facepalm: This is the thinking in our media as they also know these T20s and coming ODIs matter more than the tests.
:aha: :aha: :aha: :aha: All is forgotten now that the Tontee Tontee sooperstars have risen to the occasion and taken revenge for the 2-1 loss in India as well as the 4-0 in England :yay:

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