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ICC World T20, 2012 SriLanka

ICC World T20, 2012 SriLanka  

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:hysterical:' date=' Russell was gob-smacked. :hysterical:[/quote'] Did you hear the "banter" between Russell and Bishop. Didn't sound like they were enjoying each other's company.

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I remember Mike hussey saying that Aussies thought that 225+ would be enuf to bowl out India after Ashwin bowled the first over which turned square to beat Watson's bat. That's not Ideal pitch for a QF. That too one side of the pitch, not both the ends.
Pls watch the match again. The ball didn't turn square in the first over, and secondly 250-260 was a par score on the pitch which is what was proven. Just because Hussey "thought" the pitch would turn doesn't make it a poor pitch as was proven the way India chased :facepalm:

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Birth of a new T20 role? 100m Six Power Hitter After today's final one can see the edge West Indies had over other nations in this year's World T20. The big boundaries and slowness of the pitch meant six hitting was increasingly influenced by pure physical strength factor. A peep at the top six hitters list, and it is quite evident batsmen on the list are physically very strong capable of depositing the ball over 100 meters from the crease. I was in awe when a 100m six was hit, and would keenly kept an eye on the ticker as it measured the ball's trajectory when hit for a six. Today likes of Dilshan, Sanga, and Mahela really struggled to launch the ball into orbit after being bogged unable to rotate strike or hit fours. In contrast West Indies only got out of jail once Samuels started clearing the boundary with some ease. I reckon we will be seeing more of these unique power hitter batsmen capable of hitting 100m sixes, whose mishits also go for sixes. Coming to India and IPL, the small grounds and flat pitches in India will only pepper over the need for such players in future World T20s. I hope at next IPL they increase the boundary circumference to help identify the 100m Six Power Hitter. Players who cleared 100m in World T20 2012: Samuels, Gayle, Pollard :hatsoff:

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Did you hear the "banter" between Russell and Bishop. Didn't sound like they were enjoying each other's company.
Yup, :giggle: Apparently Arnold was giving some stick to Bish in the morning at their hotel. but all in good fun, Bishop in the latter part of the game turned into Russel Arnold type commie, became where very partisan, "Badree Badreeee Badreeeee" :hysterical:

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Missed tricks in T20 I'm saying 'tricks' although these things aren't really tricks, rather straightforward strategies that a lot of teams overlook in the shortest format of the game (and even in other formats): -running b/w the wickets: the Aussies are great at this. They turn 2's into 3's, 1's into 2's and dot balls into singles. Players like Gayle and others (esp. subcontinentals) usually seem happy to take the single without even considering if 2 runs would be possible, and will jog when they could have run an extra one. Running 2's or 3's will allow you to get away with a few dot balls. Singles won't. -bowling tight: too many bowlers seem to be looking for wickets, not realizing that in such a short format if you keep it tight the wickets will create themselves. All it takes is a few overs at 3 or 4 runs an over and the batsmen will start getting very uneasy. Spinners in particular always end up paying for half-trackers, whereas the most successful spinners were the ones who were keeping it tight. -taking pace off the ball: on subcontinental pitches in particular, there's no point trying to create speedgun records when all a batsman has to do is turn their bat in the right direction (or even edge it in the wrong direction) and the ball races away to the boundary. This is another reason why slower bowlers excelled. -short ball quota: the short ball is probably one of the most common defects in modern-day batsmen, with only a handful who can consistently put it away to the boundary. There's a quota for short balls per over, and I'm surprised most pacemen don't use this as it almost guarantees a dot ball if delivered correctly. Just make sure the WK knows (esp. if it's Akmal). -tight fields: some skippers seem so concerned about boundaries (rightly so) that they don't set tight fields at times when it would put some pressure on the batsmen (especially if they're in a situation where singles would give them the win). I hope we see some intelligent play in the IPL. As long as it's treated like a brainless ball-bashing contest our players aren't going to learn anything. Once people start using some strategy, better fielding, intelligent batting and bowling, then it's going to pay dividends.

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Karma is a Lankan cheerleader. After preparing a joke of a pitch to prevent the Windies from blitzing their bowling unit, the Lankans ended up struggling to make three figures on their home ground. If it weren't for Kulasekara (or Rampaul) they would have been out for less than 100.

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-running b/w the wickets: the Aussies are great at this. They turn 2's into 3's, 1's into 2's and dot balls into singles. Players like Gayle and others (esp. subcontinentals) usually seem happy to take the single without even considering if 2 runs would be possible, and will jog when they could have run an extra one. Running 2's or 3's will allow you to get away with a few dot balls. Singles won't.
This is big one. Not only West Indies were at fault, but we failed miserably when Yuvi was the crease. In that game against Australia missed out on like 8 to 10 runs by him turning down twos and threes. Also if look at this way first five balls, 1 1 2 1 0, and final ball goes for 4, you have wonderful over. But this, 0 0 0 1 0 6, and it's about par but that six coming off a high risk shot which could result in wicket too. But yeah, twos and threes will be vital, especially on slow pitches and big boundaries. Which also means players will need better stamina (Yuvi :hehe:) and pace (Sehwag :hehe:).

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I hope we see some intelligent play in the IPL. As long as it's treated like a brainless ball-bashing contest our players aren't going to learn anything. Once people start using some strategy, better fielding, intelligent batting and bowling, then it's going to pay dividends.
The problem is the "experts" believe crowd want to see SIXES, so best way to garuntee this is pattas and small boundaries like chinaswamy stadium .

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The problem is the "experts" believe crowd want to see SIXES, so best way to garuntee this is pattas and small boundaries like chinaswamy stadium
Shift all the games to Dharamsala!
Also if look at this way first five balls, 1 1 2 1 0, and final ball goes for 4, you have wonderful over. But this, 0 0 0 1 0 6, and it's about par but that six coming off a high risk shot which could result in wicket too.
Great point. If you manage doubles in the first three balls you're already on 6 runs off the over. That leaves another 3 to try to find a gap and get a boundary, or run a single if it doesn't work. Waiting for the last overs or freebie balls to start hitting sixes hardly ever works. Might as well play intelligently (and still leave the last few overs for some big hitting) and end up with a big total. Too many players seemed to be waiting for loose balls to come their way (ABDV, Ross Taylor, even MSD seemed to assume they would inevitably start hitting 6's all of a sudden).

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Everyone Paid :aha:
Thank you texy!!! Awesome win for the windies... hopefully its the start of something good for their cricket as they bring a lot of excitement and talent to this sport. :giggle: poor lankans lost yet another finals.... how many finals have they lost since winning the odi wc in 1996 oh boy

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It was awesome to see batting recovery by the Windies after the 10 overs :hatsoff: 138 seemed a easy target for the Ravans with advantage of home pitch...just checked scores instead of watching live...after the third wicket fell for 51...just sat down to view the whole match....and it was well worth it!!! :two_thumbs_up: Gayle celebration towards the end was so cool :dance:

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I'm saying 'tricks' although these things aren't really tricks, rather straightforward strategies that a lot of teams overlook in the shortest format of the game (and even in other formats): -running b/w the wickets: the Aussies are great at this. They turn 2's into 3's, 1's into 2's and dot balls into singles. Players like Gayle and others (esp. subcontinentals) usually seem happy to take the single without even considering if 2 runs would be possible, and will jog when they could have run an extra one. Running 2's or 3's will allow you to get away with a few dot balls. Singles won't. -bowling tight: too many bowlers seem to be looking for wickets, not realizing that in such a short format if you keep it tight the wickets will create themselves. All it takes is a few overs at 3 or 4 runs an over and the batsmen will start getting very uneasy. Spinners in particular always end up paying for half-trackers, whereas the most successful spinners were the ones who were keeping it tight. -taking pace off the ball: on subcontinental pitches in particular, there's no point trying to create speedgun records when all a batsman has to do is turn their bat in the right direction (or even edge it in the wrong direction) and the ball races away to the boundary. This is another reason why slower bowlers excelled. -short ball quota: the short ball is probably one of the most common defects in modern-day batsmen, with only a handful who can consistently put it away to the boundary. There's a quota for short balls per over, and I'm surprised most pacemen don't use this as it almost guarantees a dot ball if delivered correctly. Just make sure the WK knows (esp. if it's Akmal). -tight fields: some skippers seem so concerned about boundaries (rightly so) that they don't set tight fields at times when it would put some pressure on the batsmen (especially if they're in a situation where singles would give them the win). I hope we see some intelligent play in the IPL. As long as it's treated like a brainless ball-bashing contest our players aren't going to learn anything. Once people start using some strategy, better fielding, intelligent batting and bowling, then it's going to pay dividends.
Good insights but as you say all of these are basics - as far as intelligent play in IPL goes that's not happening. The boundary ropes will be brought in to see a min. 160 pitch and 's' number of minimum 6s and 'f' number of minimum 4s.

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Mahela Jayawardene's blunders in final 1) Not picking Herath over Kulasekara. 2)Persisting with Malinga even when he was thrashed by Samuels.It was clear watching after few overs that spin was almost unplayable by West Indian batsmen.Yet somehow he continued with medium pace

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1st is not a blunder. Kulasekara is the one who tied up West Indies big time. Herath against Gayle would have been like goat against slaughter machine. He massacres left arm spinners.
I don't understand why SL need 4 pacers in team.WI is not just Gayle ,I guess MJ too had this type of thinking that Gayle will massacre Herath.Gayle flopped in the match but still West indies won

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