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Nova

In quest of India's national dish.... what is it?

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I meant it's not something that can exclusively be identified as a southie dish.
+1. Hyderabadi Biryani was brought to south India by the Muslim traders, but originally it was from north India. When the army used to go fight under the hot/ humid summer, they wanted a meal having all the nutrients/ spices/ meat together without the hassle of separate breads/ rice/ curry. Hence Biryani was invented. Infact, Lucknow Biryani is older than Hyderabadi Biryani, though the latter is more famous.

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Never had or even saw biryani once in 17 years I spent in Chandigarh. Things maybe changing now' date= but the only southie food (if you can call Biryani that) that has nationwide presence is dosa and to some extent, idli.
PK, I iz disappoint regarding Biryani, you would be surprised how it varies every few hundred miles down south. Biryani ftw :two_thumbs_up:

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+1. Hyderabadi Biryani was brought to south India by the Muslim traders' date= but originally it was from north India. When the army used to go fight under the hot/ humid summer, they wanted a meal having all the nutrients/ spices/ meat together without the hassle of separate breads/ rice/ curry. Hence Biryani was invented. Infact, Lucknow Biryani is older than Hyderabadi Biryani, though the latter is more famous.
-1 Biryani not Hyderabadi biryani was brought to south india. Many varieties were invented from the kitchens of the Nizams.

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PK, I iz disappoint regarding Biryani, you would be surprised how it varies every few hundred miles down south. Biryani ftw :two_thumbs_up:
I mean when I was in chandigarh, though my uncle ran a semi-southie restaurant for 10 years (he had an excellent dosa). After moving out, I have had more than enough of my fair share. Spent 4 months in Chennai, then 2 years with a gult roomie in US who would bribe me with biryani if I spent my friday evening watching telugu movies with his gang (with subtitles ofcourse)..:two_thumbs_up:

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I mean when I was in chandigarh, though my uncle ran a semi-southie restaurant for 10 years (he had an excellent dosa). After moving out, I have had more than enough of my fair share. Spent 4 months in Chennai, then 2 years with a gult roomie in US who would bribe me with biryani if I spent my friday evening watching telugu movies with his gang (with subtitles ofcourse)..:two_thumbs_up:
I wouldnt watch that crap for all the biryani in the world and am part gult.

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-1 Biryani not Hyderabadi biryani was brought to south india. Many varieties were invented from the kitchens of the Nizams.
Yeah my bad. I meant Biryani as a whole was brought to south India and the one prepared by the Nizams of Hyderabad was known as hyderabadi biryani.

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Is there any proof that Biryani originated in North India?
The word Biryani itself is derived from the Persian word "Birian". In Farsi, Birian means fried before cooking, as the rice used to be sauted in ghee. What can you conclude from this? Again debatable and there is no definitive answer. But let me add more: Food historian Salma Husain lets us in on the secret of a delicious korma biryani: “When Babar came to India in the 1500s, he brought along cooks and cooking styles of Uzbekistan. For the first time, the natives here were introduced to pulao,” says food historian and author of The Emperor’s Table: The Art of Mughal Cuisine Salma Husain. The pulao, a dish with rice and large chunks of goat meat, was perfect for the travelling kitchens of his armies. In India, when pulao was cooked with local spices, it became biryani. This dish of golden rice, fried onion and chunks of cooked lamb is a testament to the virtues of slow cooking. “It originated in the kitchens of central Asia but it was in India that the dish found its true lovers,” says Husain as she readies to prepare the delicacy in her kitchen in Delhi. “If you walk into the food bazaars of Tashkent and Samarkhand, you will come across an impressive variety of this dish. However, Mughal cooks added a personal touch to it and layered the rice and mutton. In pulao, usually all ingredients are cooked together which is not so in biryani,” she says. The Hyderabadi cooking style has a strong Iranian influence, Husain says. The dishes are robustly spiced and when the Portuguese arrived in India, they brought sacks of chillies, which was added to the dish. http://www.indianexpress.com/news/spice-route/518713/2

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Yes. The fact that there is no coconut in it. :hysterical: :hahaha: :hehe:
:hahaha: Although I do love coconut. Thai Panang Curry in coconut milk base :pray: But in keeping with Indian theme of the thread, coconut laddoo mmm img_6786.jpg

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Aloo can be declared as the national vegetable of India. Almost every corner of India makes dishes with Aloos in it :eating:
I was just thinking of eating Aloo paratha. A couple people in this thread mentioned about rounding off the Dal Chawal with Aloo Gobi and pickle. Perfect. Now that sound's like the national dish of the masses. Aloo goes in Pani Puri.. Aloo goes in Pav Bhaji Aloo goes in Samosa Aloo goes in masala dosa Aloo goes in Calcutta Biryani I also look like a Aloo :woot:

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I was just thinking of eating Aloo paratha. A couple people in this thread mentioned about rounding off the Dal Chawal with Aloo Gobi and pickle. Perfect. Now that sound's like the national dish of the masses. Aloo goes in Pani Puri.. Aloo goes in Pav Bhaji Aloo goes in Samosa Aloo goes in masala dosa Aloo goes in Calcutta Biryani I also look like a Aloo :woot:
:agree:

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I was just thinking of eating Aloo paratha. A couple people in this thread mentioned about rounding off the Dal Chawal with Aloo Gobi and pickle. Perfect. Now that sound's like the national dish of the masses. Aloo goes in Pani Puri.. Aloo goes in Pav Bhaji Aloo goes in Samosa Aloo goes in masala dosa Aloo goes in Calcutta Biryani I also look like a Aloo :woot:
Which is why its so incredible that few people in India had seen a potato, let alone taste one till 250 or so years ago. Similar story with tomato. Yet today its unfathomable to think of an Indian kitchen without these two staples.

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I was just thinking of eating Aloo paratha. A couple people in this thread mentioned about rounding off the Dal Chawal with Aloo Gobi and pickle. Perfect. Now that sound's like the national dish of the masses. Aloo goes in Pani Puri.. Aloo goes in Pav Bhaji Aloo goes in Samosa Aloo goes in masala dosa Aloo goes in Calcutta Biryani I also look like a Aloo :woot:
Photos of each one of those or I don't believe you :hitler:

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Aloo can be declared as the national vegetable of India. Almost every corner of India makes dishes with Aloos in it :eating:
Thats a dumb argument. The same goes for onion, bhindi, karela, etc etc...What next? National drink? Let me guess, water??

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Thats a dumb argument. The same goes for onion' date=' bhindi, karela, etc etc...What next? National drink? Let me guess, water??[/quote'] National drink: Lassi/ Tea National dessert: Kheer National food (overall): Dosa/ Samosa National mouth freshner: Paan :dance:

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National drink: Lassi/ Tea National dessert: Kheer National food (overall): Dosa/ Samosa National mouth freshner: Paan :dance:
Now that I agree with. Unless someone posts that they never saw a paan shop in their city/village.

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Outlook keeps coming out with gimmicks such as these. If we can have a national dish then perhaps we can have a national language as well? We all know how that will go.
Its nothing official as such buddy. We are just discussing foods that are acceptable and consumed throughout the country, same as Cricket :dance: Though there are some who haven't had very common dishes of India like Biryani (Sabby :giggle:). What about Pakodas and chai on a rainy day

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Its nothing official as such buddy. We are just discussing foods that are acceptable and consumed throughout the country, same as Cricket :dance: Though there are some who haven't had very common dishes of India like Biryani (Sabby :giggle:). What about Pakodas and chai on a rainy day
Nobody said it's official. But would this magazine run a feature to find out the unofficial national language? The entire exercise is bogus because of its assumption that there's some cultural entity that's described by the term Indian. It'll be perfectly legitimate to run a feature on the signature Bengali cuisine because now we have a tangible cultural being. India or Indian is strictly political and it's a mistake to view it as anything else.

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Nobody said it's official. But would this magazine run a feature to find out the unofficial national language? The entire exercise is bogus because of its assumption that there's some cultural entity that's described by the term Indian. It'll be perfectly legitimate to run a feature on the signature Bengali cuisine because now we have a tangible cultural being. India or Indian is strictly political and it's a mistake to view it as anything else.
You mean if it is not tangible, it cannot be accounted for or in simple words debated upon? The whole fabric of the nation is "unity in diversity". When you have cities like Delhi, Mumbai etc. where every bit of Indian culture is assimilated and perhaps, over the years resulted into some unique intangible culture (Delhi style hindi/ Bambaiya cusine, etc.), why not treat the whole country as a single unit with multiple "charateristics"! I agree with your statement of a single cultural aspect among many, but there are certain things that transcends regionalism, aka music, sports, nationalism, religion, food (you can go from kanniyakumari to Srinagar and find Indian Chai at each and ever station)!

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Let me rephrase. I enjoy a sambhar but I'll be very upset if I were called a sambhar sniffer. When you write about Indian cuisine it assumes there's something culturally Indian. Except that there's nothing culturally Indian.
You get upset very easily then. :cantstop:

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With over 30% of the people being vegetarian? :protest: what kind of bullsh1t site is this? :desiman:
+1 A non-veg dish can never be the national food of India. It has to be something that is consumed by the majority. Hence I propose any of these three (drinks included) 1) Dosa 2) Tea 3) Samosa

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Chai? Another pretender. Asli mardonwalah drink hain to yeh. I see your brown colored water and raise this... Filter_coffee_South_Indian_style.JPG
Mardon waala drink? I take it you have never been to neighbourhood Starbucks. Coffee is a woman's drink thru and thru Sirji. Matter of fact anytime I want to keep my missus quiet for a while, I take her to the nearby cafe and let her enjoy the coffee as I enjoy the tranquility. Works every time :--D

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For a guy who drinks both tea and coffee occasionally, I find coffee to be more rich in taste. If both are readily available, i would go for coffee. But tea works for me too. I remember going home once and asked my mom if there is any coffee powder, she gave me a "what's wrong with you" look. :cantstop:

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