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Let us use this thread to keep updates about chess. Men Magnus Carlsen continues his splendid run this year winning Shamkir Open to add to Wijk Aan Zee and Grenke Chess Classic. He is the undisputed best player in the world leading the rankings in classical, rapid and blitz. Anand was never this dominating although he was a monster in rapid/blitz in his younger days, Fischer and Kasparov were never the best in shorter time controls but this guy Magnus is a freak !!! Remember he won all 3 of them last year becoming only the 2nd player in history after Anand to win the chess triple crown. But TBH nobody really cares about rapid, even less so about blitz :giggle: Classical is the ultimate form of chess like test cricket and nobody is within touching distance of the Norwegian. Anand is world number 2 at the ripe old age of 45, probably the oldest no 2 since Botvinik in the late 50s. It is a shame that none of the younger guns have stepped up to challenge Carlsen instead ceding ground to a veteran who played his 1st World Championship match when they were in diapers. Caruana's run in 2014 looks like distant memory and he isn't consistent enough to challenge MC. Nakamura is Carlsen's *****, Aronian is in steep decline and Topalov/Kramnik/Gelfand are done and dusted. Giri, So, Karjakin simply do not have the quality to compete with any of the above mentioned players. Only hope is Wei Yi, the 15 year old Chinese prodigy who is ELO 2718 and ranked world number 33. OUtskwa.jpg The difference between Carlsen(World No 1) and Anand (World No 2) is 72 points ,the same as that between Anand and Ivanchuk(World No 27) :hysterical::hysterical::hail::hail: http://en.chessbase.com/post/may-2015-ratings-vishy-anand-is-world-no-2 qjq6Ija.jpg The Grand Chess Tour(outside FIDE purview) has been announced which will comprise of Norway Chess Open(June in Stavenger), Sinquefield Cup (August in St Louis) and London Chess Classic(December). The brain behind this is Kasparov. This will have political ramifications and probably result in a breakaway from FIDE like the PCA in 1993. Gazza ran for FIDE presidentship against the crazy, corrupt, Putin crony lunatic Kalmykian Kirsan Ilyumzhinov last year only to lose pathetically(ahem, ICC, FIDE aren't the only corrupt sporting bodies :winky:). Kasparov wants to topple this guy in FIDE much like he wants to topple Putin in Russia. But Kirsan(Srini Mama of the chess world) who is backed to the hilt by Kremlin is very shrewd and ruthless, expect lots of events to clash with this, especially those important from World Championship point of view in the coming days. I expect fireworks very soon. BTW the players who will play this series are all top 12 players, making it an extremely strong series of events. There will be winners in each of these events and an overall winner based on performance in all 3. There are plans to rope in Jakarta to make it 4 events per year but that will happen not before 2016. 9 players have been confirmed for this: Magnus Carlsen, Norway Viswanathan Anand, India Fabiano Caruana, Italy Alexander Grischuk, Russia Veselin Topalov, Bulgaria Levon Aronian, Armenia Anish Giri, Netherlands Hikaru Nakamura, USA Maxime Vachier lagrave, France MIVspRO.jpg Kramnik surprisingly pulled out and Karjakin(the winner of the last 2 editions, pictured below) has been dropped to the surprise of many. This is probably because he is a Putin admirer and Gazza hates anything to do with Putin. KR906wc.jpg Kirsan the FIDE President for life :dance:(extreme right), Putin the Russian President and dear leader(Centre) and Andrey Filatov the Russian Chess Federation President(Left) will do everything they can to jeopardize Kasparov's latest antics. mLeAzjz.jpghttps://chess24.com/en/read/news/a-new-era-in-chess-begins-today The Candidates will be held in early 2016. So far only Anand has qualified. 2 players from the Chess World Cup, 2 from the Grand Prix Series, 2 by virtue of rating and an organizer's nominee will complete the field of 8 challengers. The World Team Championship concluded in Armenia last week. China clinched Gold. India finished 9th out of 10 teams :(( but Anand, Harikrishna and Sasikiran, our top 3 players weren't playing. After Anand retires India will be a non entity in the world of chess sadly, absolute lack of top talent. Adox6Dv.jpg Other events to look forward to in the coming months are Biel Invitational, Dortmund, FIDE Grand Prix, FIDE World Cup and the rapid/blitz world championships. But Carlsen and Anand will play only in June(Norway open). Women Mariya Muzychuk(Ukraine) won the Knock Out event this year and will be up against Hou Yifan(China) (who is the overwhelming favourite) later this year. Hou is the highest rated woman in the world even surpassing Judit Polgar and her dominance over others in the women field will put even Magnus to shame. She is world number 55, the only woman in the top 100 by a long way. Sometimes she gets invited to play against the elite male players in top tier tournaments for example Wijk Aan Zee earlier this year.She in fact has a winning record(2-0) against Anish Giri, world Number 9. :hatsoff: Koneru Humpy is the 3rd best women's player but her best years are behind her, especially after her marriage last year. I doubt she can reach the summit unless Hou decides to stop playing in women's events and focuses only on men's events(like Judit). Harika is at world number 15, others are pretty ordinary compared to the talent the rest of the world has to offer. xHGs02C.jpgHou Yifan, the strongest woman chess player of all time after Judit Polgar and still only 21 !!! AlV22Xr.jpgMariya Muzychuk who will face Hou later this year GzeEnP3.jpgHumpy® and Harika(L), pride of India qsD4uOb.jpg I don't follow non WC matches involving women but will update in case any Indian does well !!! BTW in the World Team Championship(held in China) we finished a creditable 4th out of 10 teams. Georgia took gold. 1ODbfJ7.jpg

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Why is there separate ranking for women in chess ? Chess has nothing to do with physical capability
There is a huge gulf in class between men players and women players among the elite. Only Judit Polgar and Hou Yifan have broken into the top 100 overall rankings. Chess has a lot to do with physical capability. Playing for 6-7 hours daily for 10-15 days at a stretch requires a tremendous deal of physical stamina, especially among the better players who do a lot of calculation and stuff. Most of the top 10 players routinely run half marathons/marathons and are fitter than our cricketers. Have you the way Carlsen/Aronian/Topalov train or for that matter even Anand. I have heard from a Chess reporter in Spain that Anand used to cycle 20-30 miles at a stretch during his time in Spain had a bench press 1RPM of 240 lbs :cantstop: Aronian has a marathon timed under 3 hours, Simen Adgestein the Norwegian GM played football for Norway national team in the 90s, About Kasparov forget it, he will shame even top tennis players as far as fitness regime is concerned !!! Also men are more ruthless/competitive while women(with a couple of exceptions) are soft. Moreover in most tournaments women prefer to play with women only and not against men, so separate ranking makes sense.

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This is a recent controversy. Nigel Short says men 'hardwired' to be better chess players than women A TWIC article(over 6 weeks old !!!!) was the center of attention recently when some tabloid news picked up the story and thus ensued an attack on the British GM Nigel Short by women chess players and feminists worlwide. The controversy soon snowballed and all leading print media took up the story and chess got a lot of free publicity. :--D Full text of the article from TWIC is in this link: http://en.chessbase.com/post/vive-la-diffrence-the-full-story http://www.chess.com/news/media-storm-over-grandmaster-gender-column-9730 http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/apr/20/nigel-short-uk-grandmaster-men-hardwired-better-chess-players-women http://time.com/3828179/chess-nigel-short-sexist-inequality/ zWO30o1K3Mc

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Carlsen will remain world champion until the end of this decade and beyond. wtf is with the silly World Cup tournament with all these blitz and rapid games though. No world championship this year. Should be candidates then world championship match every year. Finalists of world cup qualify for candidates though. Want to see Carlsen v Caruana for the title in 2016.

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Carlsen will remain world champion until the end of this decade and beyond. wtf is with the silly World Cup tournament with all these blitz and rapid games though. No world championship this year. Should be candidates then world championship match every year. Finalists of world cup qualify for candidates though. Want to see Carlsen v Caruana for the title in 2016.
Caruana of present isn't half as good as he was those 3-4 months of 2014. These days he gets easily beaten by Carlsen with both colors and never looks even mildly threatening. TBH the only person i see who can topple Carlsen is Anand(surprise). His resurgence is heartening to see, if only he prepares intensely like he did before Bonn, 2008 he will end the myth about Carlsen being invincible. But his son is 4 years old and he prefers spending time with his family over competition. Anand is the only person who has a good record against Carlsen till date(19-17 in Carlsen's favor) http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?pid=52948&pid2=12088 Aronian,Nakamura,Topalov have pathetic record against him,Kramnik hasn't beaten him for 5 years and Caruana has lost 5 out of 5 matches the last 6 months !!!!

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Caruana of present isn't half as good as he was those 3-4 months of 2014. These days he gets easily beaten by Carlsen with both colors and never looks even mildly threatening. TBH the only person i see who can topple Carlsen is Anand(surprise). His resurgence is heartening to see, if only he prepares intensely like he did before Bonn, 2008 he will end the myth about Carlsen being invincible. But his son is 4 years old and he prefers spending time with his family over competition. Anand is the only person who has a good record against Carlsen till date(19-17 in Carlsen's favor) http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chess.pl?pid=52948&pid2=12088 Aronian,Nakamura,Topalov have pathetic record against him,Kramnik hasn't beaten him for 5 years and Caruana has lost 5 out of 5 matches the last 6 months !!!!
Anand was so comfortably beaten both times that it would be pointless to have a 3rd match regardless of how hard he works, ecpecially given by 2016 he'll be even older. Did Caruana have that recent bad run after that good run in classical matches or shorter ones? Regardless Carlsen is too dominant and will comfortably beat Anand again. He will probably beat Caruana too but atleast he is still young, improving and better than the other options out there. Carlsen v Anand 3 is pointless I reckon. Cannot see it ending in any different way.

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Anand was so comfortably beaten both times that it would be pointless to have a 3rd match regardless of how hard he works, ecpecially given by 2016 he'll be even older. Did Caruana have that recent bad run after that good run in classical matches or shorter ones? Regardless Carlsen is too dominant and will comfortably beat Anand again. He will probably beat Caruana too but atleast he is still young, improving and better than the other options out there. Carlsen v Anand 3 is pointless I reckon. Cannot see it ending in any different way.
Caruana's recent bad run was in classical. In shorter time controls he is very weak and will lose to almost any of the top 10 players, so if he has to beat Carlsen he must do it in the 12 games and not take it to tie breaks. Chennai 2013 was one sided because Anand was in a mid life crisis and was pondering retirement( between 2009 to 2013 he didn't win a single classical tournament and notched very few wins against the elite). Also he had lost motivation because he had to defend the title almost every year and hence couldn't divulge opening preparation in the non WCC tournaments and this took a heavy toll on him. By contrast Karpov, Kasparov(in the 90s),Kramnik had a lot of leeway regarding scheduling during their times, so they didn't burn out. Sochi 2014 was a struggle, not one sided at all. A stroke of luck for Carlsen in he 6th game decided the outcome. In G11 Anand took an unnecessary gamble because he was trailing. Anand made Carlsen huff and puff and even his dad said that those were the 3 most stressful weeks in Carlsen's chess career. If you looks at the games Anand was getting very good positions on the board, at least in 7 out of the 11 games he was in a very comfortable position and serious close to winning positions in 3 games(:hatsoff: to Carlsens's resilience). The other players can't even get a favorable position against Carlsen(except Kramnik but he is going downhill due to age), no way are they stopping him. Anand is playing better now and if he gets into the 2006-2008 form he will beat Carlsen(I believe every great champion has one last great sparkle before they go away). Anand of Bonn 2008 would destroy the present Carlsen. That match was one of the greatest displays of chess the world has ever seen, making Kramnik(conqueror of Kasparov) look like a complete novice. Some chess program was comparing accuracy of moves for players in WCC and Bonn 2008 turned out to be the one with greatest accuracy by the victor. Even Carlsen (in 2013) or Fischer(1972) or Kasparov didn't have the same accuracy that Vishy showed in that match. Only 2-3 moves weren't computer recommended 1st lines, flawless display.

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Caruana's recent bad run was in classical. In shorter time controls he is very weak and will lose to almost any of the top 10 players, so if he has to beat Carlsen he must do it in the 12 games and not take it to tie breaks. Chennai 2013 was one sided because Anand was in a mid life crisis and was pondering retirement( between 2009 to 2013 he didn't win a single classical tournament and notched very few wins against the elite). Also he had lost motivation because he had to defend the title almost every year and hence couldn't divulge opening preparation in the non WCC tournaments and this took a heavy toll on him. By contrast Karpov, Kasparov(in the 90s),Kramnik had a lot of leeway regarding scheduling during their times, so they didn't burn out. Sochi 2014 was a struggle, not one sided at all. A stroke of luck for Carlsen in he 6th game decided the outcome. In G11 Anand took an unnecessary gamble because he was trailing. Anand made Carlsen huff and puff and even his dad said that those were the 3 most stressful weeks in Carlsen's chess career. If you looks at the games Anand was getting very good positions on the board, at least in 7 out of the 11 games he was in a very comfortable position and serious close to winning positions in 3 games(:hatsoff: to Carlsens's resilience). The other players can't even get a favorable position against Carlsen(except Kramnik but he is going downhill due to age), no way are they stopping him. Anand is playing better now and if he gets into the 2006-2008 form he will beat Carlsen(I believe every great champion has one last great sparkle before they go away). Anand of Bonn 2008 would destroy the present Carlsen. That match was one of the greatest displays of chess the world has ever seen, making Kramnik(conqueror of Kasparov) look like a complete novice. Some chess program was comparing accuracy of moves for players in WCC and Bonn 2008 turned out to be the one with greatest accuracy by the victor. Even Carlsen (in 2013) or Fischer(1972) or Kasparov didn't have the same accuracy that Vishy showed in that match. Only 2-3 moves weren't computer recommended 1st lines, flawless display.
But like in boxing Im sure legacy is a huge thing in chess too, surely Anand cannot risk a 3rd loss? The midlife crisis is a part of life, everyone has problems and things going on and Carlsen prevailed like a champion giving him a huge edge mentally. Anyways also like boxing Mayweather may beat Pacman comfortably yet Pacman may still beat the 3rd best welterweight in the world comfortably. That being said way I see it I would still rather watch Mayweather vs someone new even though Pacman may be clear No.2. Yes it was close at certain stages and yes Carlsen dropped a game last time but I don't see Anand coming back...he threw what he had at Carlsen and Carlsen prevailed easy or not easy...that's a huge mental edge. And with Anand aging, losing the psychological edge I don't see that last effort he has left in him being enough...rather see a new face, a new style. Will be hard for Anand to feel motivated after 2 losses like that also, easier said than done he will suddenly be back to his best (Bonn 2008). Carlsen is only getting better each year too as he moves into mid 20's. Everything is against Anand. Everything is against anyone facing Carlsen but like I said Caruana is younger than Carlsen and there is room for improvement and he's also a fresh face and something new. Im sure at 22 years age many Chess players had certain weaknesses but 2800+ rating at that age is something that makes him a contender regardless of recent form. Has been up to 2844 at age 22, serious potential there. Will be super match up as his form can pick up any time. He will hopefully get better in shorter formats too. But maybe not enough to match Carlsen.

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I understand your point. Caruana indeed is the best bet among the current younger generation players. He will most probably still lose comfortably(his weakness in rapids/blitz means he has to take unnecessary risks in the match to wrap it up in 12 games and that is never good against someone like Magnus who thrives on opponents over pressing). Nakamura,Aronian,Karjakin,So,will get massacred unlike Caruana who at least has experience of taking down Carlsen and hence won't panic unlike others in winning positions. But yeah I don't see the Norwegian surrendering his crown for another 10 years at least, especially with Father Time working against the 2 players who give him real trouble, Anand(age 45) and Kramnik(age 40). But the dark horse according to me is Grischuk(Russia, age 31) who is as accurate as Carlsen but frequently runs into time trouble because he has a habit of over thinking, over analyzing after every move(BUT SUPER ACCURATE!!!). He is also psychologically very strong, has backing of the powerful RCF and if he qualifies will have a super Russian team to aid in his preparation. He is a former World Blitz champ and he needn't fear if the match extends to tie breaks. But qualifying through the candidates will be hard for him since he doesn't have a good experience of coming outright 1st in strong double round robins. FIDE has incorporated time increments from the 1st move itself this year onwards in all FIDE affiliated events which will help players like Grischuk, Caruana, Ivanchuk,Topalov etc and work against guys like Anand,Carlsen, Nakamura,Aronian who through their fast play put tremendous pressure on the opponents. Mark my words if Grischuk qualifies as the contender we have a classic on our hands. Alexander Grischuk, 'the dark horse'. julN19A.jpg H2H between Carlsen and and other elite players (guys who have the best chance of facing him in WCC 2016) in case you are interested: vs Anand Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Viswanathan Anand 10 to 7, with 36 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Viswanathan Anand 19 to 17, with 54 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Viswanathan Anand beat Magnus Carlsen 10 to 9, with 18 draws. vs Kramnik Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Vladimir Kramnik 5 to 4, with 13 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Vladimir Kramnik 13 to 11, with 23 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Vladimir Kramnik 8 to 7, with 10 draws. vs Caruana Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Fabiano Caruana 7 to 4, with 8 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Fabiano Caruana 18 to 6, with 8 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Fabiano Caruana 11 to 2. vs Aronian Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Levon Aronian 11 to 4, with 29 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Levon Aronian 17 to 13, with 44 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Levon Aronian beat Magnus Carlsen 9 to 6, with 15 draws. vs Topalov Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Veselin Topalov 8 to 3, with 8 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Veselin Topalov 14 to 3, with 15 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Veselin Topalov 6 to 0, with 7 draws. vs Grischuk Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Alexander Grischuk 2 to 0, with 8 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Alexander Grischuk 10 to 7, with 13 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Alexander Grischuk 8 to 7, with 5 draws. vs Nakamura Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Hikaru Nakamura 11 to 0, with 16 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Hikaru Nakamura 17 to 5, with 23 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Hikaru Nakamura 6 to 5, with 7 draws. vs Karjakin Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Sergey Karjakin 3 to 1, with 14 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Sergey Karjakin 17 to 7, with 19 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Sergey Karjakin 14 to 6, with 5 draws. vs Anish Giri Classical games: Anish Giri beat Magnus Carlsen 1 to 0, with 7 draws. (Giri beat him once and after that always plays for draw right from move 1 to maintain his H2H advantage, ultra defensive chap, can never win Candidates :giggle:) Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Anish Giri 2 to 1, with 8 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Anish Giri 2 to 0, with 1 draw. vs Gelfand Classical games: Magnus Carlsen beat Boris Gelfand 5 to 1, with 9 draws. Including rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Boris Gelfand 13 to 5, with 20 draws. Only rapid/exhibition games: Magnus Carlsen beat Boris Gelfand 8 to 4, with 11 draws.

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Good read hadn't heard of Grischuk before, since Im relatively new and did know about most but not all the top 10 players :two_thumbs_up: Still 2-0 from 10 games, with Carlsen still moving into the prime of his life and Grischuk already in it gives Carlsen the edge there....the thing with Carauna is we have not seen him at his best yet given that he's only 22. We know Grischuk is at his peak but Carauna is still moving into his peak. Still though so he is 8-7 v Carlsen in shorter formats, very impressive... :nice: Regarding the head to head's though how many of Anand's 7 wins were over a younger less developed Carlsen and how many since he became the best? Or started to show signs of his peak potential? Cause Carlsen was grandmaster at a very young age he must have lost initially.... Caruana is impressive tbh considering he must have started facing Carlsen when he was a bit more experienced...he is 2 years younger after all. Also lold at that troll Giri, Carlsen must hate him :hysterical:

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Yeah Grischuk is in his prime now and I expect him to play at a very high level for another 3-4 years at least. The biggest advantage for him over Caruana,Nakamura,Aronain etc is his psychological toughness. He isn't afraid of Carlsen now, he wasn't afraid of Kasparov,Anand,etc a few years back. Even under severe time pressure he is accurate and never crumbles, in fact he is also a top poker player and you can never read his face, he looks like an SS officer across the board never showing any emotion. He is also a an extremely good rapid/blitz player and a streetfighter and never gives up. Contrast that to Caruana who was shivering like crazy in Shamkir against Carlsen, he was intimidated by Magnus and couldn't even make eye contact with him. He also gives up very easily, here he resigned against MC in 11 moves !!!! http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1756884 But sure he is very young and can get better with experience. But Kasparov doesn't think too highly of Caruana and said that 2014 Caruana was the best level he can ever attain in his career. Many eminent Russian chess writers/players/journalists seem to think that Caruana isn't talented , he is mainly a very hard worker and hard work can get you only so far. It is true that among elite players Caruana works the hardest on his game but talent wise he is inferior to someone like Anish Giri or even a Karjakin. One thing you must remember about Carlsen is that he started playing at a very high level at a very young age. In 2007-2008 itself he was a top 3 player and regularly played in the super tournaments. In 2009 he was coached by Kasparov and that took him to a different level. Because of that collaboration he knows a lot about Anand and Kramnik. Kasparov shared his database about these 2 with Carlsen and that helped him a great deal. Normally it takes many years for a player to develop a gigantic database but in Carlsen's lap was 25 years of information about his main rivals, that too with the analysis of the greatest player of all time, Gary Kasparov. People overlook the contribution of Gazza(Kasparov's nickname :winky:) in Carlsen's rise as a champion but I feel that without that training and opening knowledge passed on from his great predecessor he would never have reached these astronomical heights, at least not at such an early age. Within a few months of the training his level shot up from 2800 ELO to 2850+ELO. Also remember when Anand has to face Carlsen he is actually facing Carlsen+Kasparov. Kasparov was Magnus' consultant before his matches and no one in the world understands Anand better than Gazza. With Gazza's advice Magnus knows what lines to play, what to avoid and how to negate Anand's fearsome opening prep. http://en.chessbase.com/post/breaking-news-carlsen-and-kasparov-join-forces http://en.chessbase.com/post/goals-met-kasparov-and-carlsen-s-new-strategy http://popchess.com/2014/04/19/carlsen-talks-about-his-training-with-kasparov-and-approach-to-chess/ Majority of Anand's wins in classical were before 2011. But Carlsen was already world no 1 in late 2009. In 2010 and early 2011 Anand beat him 4 times(in classical supertourneys like Bilbao,London Classic,Wikj Aan Zee) and even reached world no 1 in spite of not winning a single classical tournament(after Bonn 2008 he stopped caring about World Rankings and invested all his energies into defending the crown because he became world champion at a very old age).http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_FIDE_chess_world_number_ones After that Anand suffered a mid life crisis and had a prolonged slump till Candidates 2014. Carlsen beat him 7 times in between 2011 April to 2013 Chennai. In fact Anand lost to many guys like Aronian,Nakamura,Caruana,Adams,Ivanchuk in that time period. It was the lowest he has reached as a chess player, similar to what Sachin went through in the aftermath of his tennis elbow. But he is playing better since the Candidates but still nowhere close to what he was doing in the late 90s till the mid 2000s(the toughest era in chess history). Unfortunately for us most of his career overlapped with Kasparov, probably the the greatest ever and he always played second fiddle to him. Now his career is overlapping with Carlsen. :(( As Indians we must be proud of Anand because he was in the top 3 in World Rankings from 1995 to 2011 and has been a permanent fixture in the top 10 from 1991 to today. That is 24 years of being in the elite, even Kramnik and Topalov became regular fixtures in the top 10 only in the late 90s and have dropped out many times out of top 10.(Most recently Kramnik spent his time as world no 12 for a major portion of 2014 and Topalov dropped to World no 11-17 from 2011 to 2013). Very rarely will you come across any sportsperson being in the top 10 for so long, that shows the consistency of Anand. Also he is the only person to have won the world title in all 3 formats(knockout(2000 Iran/India), round robin(2007 Mexico) and match format(Bonn 2008, Sofia 2010 and Moscow 2012). Anish Giri is a super troll. He always makes fun of Carlsen calling him his "client" etc and this annoys Carlsen a great deal. Carlsen calls him a 'coward' and that is true to a great extent. Giri is supremely talented but a phattu, he won't try to win if there is even a slight possibility of losing, that attitude doesn't help you learn about the game and hence he hardly wins against other elite players. Because of this ultra negative approach he has even forgotten how to win and blows wining positions like he did against Caruana last month in Shamkir. His dad is Nepali and his grandmother's family is from northern Bihar, an Indian connection. :--D He has the best girlfriend in chess circles, the Georgian babe WGM Sopiko Guramishvili. https://www.google.co.in/search?q=sopiko+guramishvili&biw=1366&bih=655&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=jPtNVYe1OYrjuQSJ9YCgBA&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#tbm=isch&q=sopiko+guramishvili+

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Huge huge news. http://en.chessbase.com/post/caruana-switching-back-to-u-s-a After Wesley So last year Fabiano Caruana changed federations to USA. USCF is like ECB now attracting the best players from the world to represent it. :cantstop: Apart from these 2 major scalps there are at least 30 other very good players who they have roped in from Russia, Eastern Europe, S.E Asia,China,India,South America etc. Now their top 4 line up is: Caruana(Italy/USA) ELO 2803 Nakamura(USA) ELO 2799 So(Philippines/USA) ELO 2778 Kamsky(USSR/Russia/USA) ELO 2673 For the 1st time in history I think a team apart from USSR/Russia is this strong on paper. Granted Russia hasn't had any Olympiad golds since 2002(Kasparov played in it) there is no doubt that they are the best team on paper, there were 4 Russians in the 2014 Candidates(Kramnik,Karjakin,Andrekein,Svidler). Of course no country can compete with Russia's bench strength even today but USA will be favorites in the 2016 Baku Olympiad !!! People switching over to USA has a reason behind it. Rex Sinquefield the American billionaire is a patron of chess, he has invested heavily in building chess infrastructure in the States, introduced chess in schools and has joined hands with Kasparov to make USA the best place in the world to play chess. Kasparov himself oversees the best USA talents in this arrangement with personalized training and guidance. And St Louis is the new world chess capital after Moscow/St Petersburg. The Chess Club and Scholastic Center of Saint Louis has the best minds and teachers from across the globe training students and players of all levels in chess(thanks to Rex). The CCSCSL(http://saintlouischessclub.org/, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_Club_and_Scholastic_Center_of_Saint_Louis) is the best academy for chess in the world presently and will be the future grooming ground for world class players. They even host the extremely strong Sinquefield Cup and US Championship and many other smaller tourneys. Also US has the best University chess competition culture(after Russia/Ukraine of course) overtaking Spain the last 5 years and world class GMs coach the various University teams. Sinquefield is going to be the forerunner to host the World Championship in 2016 and also the Candidates early next year. there will be an organizer's wildcard and am pretty sure Rex is going to choose one of Caruana,Nakamura,So if the need arises(at present it seems Caruana,Nakamura will directly qualify). So be ready to see 3 US men in Candidates 2016. All this is making me think we are heading towards a split in the chess world with Rex/Kasparov being the driving force behind a rebel organization(Grand Chess Tour is a precursor). Very bad if that happens,:(( 1993 to 2006 was the most turbulent period in chess history thanks to the PCA split from FIDE.

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Yeah Grischuk is in his prime now and I expect him to play at a very high level for another 3-4 years at least. The biggest advantage for him over Caruana' date='Nakamura,Aronain etc is his psychological toughness. He isn't afraid of Carlsen now, he wasn't afraid of Kasparov,Anand,etc a few years back. Even under severe time pressure he is accurate and never crumbles, in fact he is also a top poker player and you can never read his face, he looks like an SS officer across the board never showing any emotion. He is also a an extremely good rapid/blitz player and a streetfighter and never gives up. Contrast that to Caruana who was shivering like crazy in Shamkir against Carlsen, he was intimidated by Magnus and couldn't even make eye contact with him. He also gives up very easily, here he resigned against MC in 11 moves !!!! [url']http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1756884 But sure he is very young and can get better with experience. But Kasparov doesn't think too highly of Caruana and said that 2014 Caruana was the best level he can ever attain in his career. Many eminent Russian chess writers/players/journalists seem to think that Caruana isn't talented , he is mainly a very hard worker and hard work can get you only so far. It is true that among elite players Caruana works the hardest on his game but talent wise he is inferior to someone like Anish Giri or even a Karjakin. One thing you must remember about Carlsen is that he started playing at a very high level at a very young age. In 2007-2008 itself he was a top 3 player and regularly played in the super tournaments. In 2009 he was coached by Kasparov and that took him to a different level. Because of that collaboration he knows a lot about Anand and Kramnik. Kasparov shared his database about these 2 with Carlsen and that helped him a great deal. Normally it takes many years for a player to develop a gigantic database but in Carlsen's lap was 25 years of information about his main rivals, that too with the analysis of the greatest player of all time, Gary Kasparov. People overlook the contribution of Gazza(Kasparov's nickname :winky:) in Carlsen's rise as a champion but I feel that without that training and opening knowledge passed on from his great predecessor he would never have reached these astronomical heights, at least not at such an early age. Within a few months of the training his level shot up from 2800 ELO to 2850+ELO. Also remember when Anand has to face Carlsen he is actually facing Carlsen+Kasparov. Kasparov was Magnus' consultant before his matches and no one in the world understands Anand better than Gazza. With Gazza's advice Magnus knows what lines to play, what to avoid and how to negate Anand's fearsome opening prep. http://en.chessbase.com/post/breaking-news-carlsen-and-kasparov-join-forces http://en.chessbase.com/post/goals-met-kasparov-and-carlsen-s-new-strategy http://popchess.com/2014/04/19/carlsen-talks-about-his-training-with-kasparov-and-approach-to-chess/ Majority of Anand's wins in classical were before 2011. But Carlsen was already world no 1 in late 2009. In 2010 and early 2011 Anand beat him 4 times(in classical supertourneys like Bilbao,London Classic,Wikj Aan Zee) and even reached world no 1 in spite of not winning a single classical tournament(after Bonn 2008 he stopped caring about World Rankings and invested all his energies into defending the crown because he became world champion at a very old age).http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_FIDE_chess_world_number_ones After that Anand suffered a mid life crisis and had a prolonged slump till Candidates 2014. Carlsen beat him 7 times in between 2011 April to 2013 Chennai. In fact Anand lost to many guys like Aronian,Nakamura,Caruana,Adams,Ivanchuk in that time period. It was the lowest he has reached as a chess player, similar to what Sachin went through in the aftermath of his tennis elbow. But he is playing better since the Candidates but still nowhere close to what he was doing in the late 90s till the mid 2000s(the toughest era in chess history). Unfortunately for us most of his career overlapped with Kasparov, probably the the greatest ever and he always played second fiddle to him. Now his career is overlapping with Carlsen. :(( As Indians we must be proud of Anand because he was in the top 3 in World Rankings from 1995 to 2011 and has been a permanent fixture in the top 10 from 1991 to today. That is 24 years of being in the elite, even Kramnik and Topalov became regular fixtures in the top 10 only in the late 90s and have dropped out many times out of top 10.(Most recently Kramnik spent his time as world no 12 for a major portion of 2014 and Topalov dropped to World no 11-17 from 2011 to 2013). Very rarely will you come across any sportsperson being in the top 10 for so long, that shows the consistency of Anand. Also he is the only person to have won the world title in all 3 formats(knockout(2000 Iran/India), round robin(2007 Mexico) and match format(Bonn 2008, Sofia 2010 and Moscow 2012). Anish Giri is a super troll. He always makes fun of Carlsen calling him his "client" etc and this annoys Carlsen a great deal. Carlsen calls him a 'coward' and that is true to a great extent. Giri is supremely talented but a phattu, he won't try to win if there is even a slight possibility of losing, that attitude doesn't help you learn about the game and hence he hardly wins against other elite players. Because of this ultra negative approach he has even forgotten how to win and blows wining positions like he did against Caruana last month in Shamkir. His dad is Nepali and his grandmother's family is from northern Bihar, an Indian connection. :--D He has the best girlfriend in chess circles, the Georgian babe WGM Sopiko Guramishvili. https://www.google.co.in/search?q=sopiko+guramishvili&biw=1366&bih=655&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=jPtNVYe1OYrjuQSJ9YCgBA&sqi=2&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#tbm=isch&q=sopiko+guramishvili+
One of the commentators at World Championships :nice: Anyways I agree with that thinking completely. With the genetic/natural potential part. It is there for everything from intelligence, looks, how good a chess player you can be, how good a cricketer you can be....list goes on. I agree everyone has a potential for everything which is maximised through hard work and an ideal environment. It's like this game called football manager. In 2005 version Ronaldo and Messi have potential ability of 195/200, their current ability is alot lower. However later on through world class training facilities at bigger clubs, and due to their high work ethic they reach their potential like they did IRL. Carlsen had the equivalent of those excellent training facilities with Kasparov as coach. He is nearing full potential. But regardless, a guy who reached one of the highest ratings of all time, that too before he is even 23....there is no way that guy does not have talent. I think nothing can be concluded about him for a few years at least because he should be getting better. And about the giving up easy who knows...sometimes people change alot when they realise mistakes. Djokovic I remember let go a grand slam final, withdrew due to something silly like a sore throat. Since then though he has shown so much fight, especially vs Nadal in that 7 hour Aus Open final where he looked out of it in 5th set. So point is people can change and Caruana probably has high natural potential due to the rating he achieved and the age he achieved it in. I think we should wait a few years before drawing any conclusions tbh.

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Jon Ludvig Hammer(one on the left in the pic) the 24 yr old Norwegian(and Carlsen's second) clinched the final spot for Norway Chess Open 2015 by winning the qualifiers ahead of 5 others. He also happens to be Carlsen's best friend, his oldest friend from the chess circuit and regular sparring partner. WlOliIH.jpg The line up looks very strong: 1.Magnus Carlsen(NOR) 2.Viswanathan Anand(IND) 3.Fabiano Caruana(USA) 4.Alexander Grischuk(RUS) 5.Veselin Topalov(BUL) 6.Levon Aronian(ARM) 7.Anish Giri(NED) 8.Hikaru Nakamura(USA) 9.Maxime Vachier Lagrave(FRA) 10.Jon Ludvig Hammer(NOR) Will start on June 15th.

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Kasparov Addresses SLU Graduates, Receives Honorary Degree http://www.chess.com/news/kasparov-receives-slu-honorary-degree-2086 Below you can watch the full spring commencement — Kasparov's speech begins at 1 hour, 5 minutes and 30 seconds. f69PHok3b_Q Transcript: Garry Kasparov: The Happiest Day Of Your Life Thank you everyone. My thanks to President Pestello for having me here, the first commencement for both of us. It is an honor to be speaking to you all, and to receive my honorary doctorate from Saint Louis University. That is especially true considering the two other honorees here today, Anita Lyons Bond and Gene Kranz. There could be no better examples of the power of dreams, values, and courage that I am here to talk about. And thank you, Rex [sinquefield], for that flattering introduction. However, he omitted one important fact about me; that I was born in the Deep South, right next to Georgia. That is, in the Deep South of the Soviet Union, at the shores of the Caspian Sea in Baku, Azerbaijan, right next to the Republic of Georgia. I hope you can understand my Southern accent! I also hope you have read about the USSR in history books. It is an odd feeling to think that most of you were not yet alive when the country I was born in ceased to exist in 1991. It’s always difficult to explain what it was like to be born and raised in a totalitarian country to those who have enjoyed the fruits of freedom and democracy from birth. To make a modern metaphor, I would say it was like being the only kid on the block whose family doesn’t have internet or television and your parents keep telling you how lucky you are not to have those things. I have been visiting St. Louis frequently in recent years, as the city has become the world capital of chess, leading the way in education and at the competitive level. This is actually restoring an old tradition. You might not know that St. Louis hosted the first official world chess championship, back in 1886. It’s a great pleasure to be here for today’s special occasion, and to finally find out what a Billiken is. When I was a little boy, growing up in Baku, my mother told me I could become the world chess champion someday. I don’t know if anyone else believed her, but I believed her. Years later, the sports authorities in the Soviet Union told me that I was a troublemaker, and that I could not become the world chess champion. Well, in 1985 I did become world champion, and this taught me the first important lesson I wish to share with you all today: listen to your mother! Six years after that, the Soviet Union and all of its sports authorities ceased to exist while my mother is still going strong. And she is still telling me what I am capable of – and to eat my vegetables. Everyone will tell you to believe in yourself, and this of course is true. Only you can decide your course and only you can make it happen. But you must also listen to those who believe in you and to take strength from their love and from their support. Often they remind us to aim high, higher than you might aim on your own, especially when you are young. I am quite sure that if you all accomplish what your mothers believe you can accomplish, that this will be the most successful graduating class in the history of the world. And for those of you who lost a parent or parents at a young age, as I lost my father when I was seven, your achievement here today reflects a special kind of strength. We are all shaped by absence as well as by presence. By the way, as soon as this is over I have to hurry to New York for the graduation of my eldest daughter, Polina. And so, congratulations as well to all my fellow parents of graduates. Well done, parents! We did it! When I won the world championship in 1985 I was 22 years old and it was the greatest day of my life. I imagine today is a similar feeling for many of you. You are young, you are strong, and you have a long-time goal in your hands. On that day in 1985, a strange thing happened. I was standing there on the stage, still with my flowers and my medal, the happiest person in the world, when I was approached by Rona Petrosian, the widow of a former world chess champion from the 60s, Tigran Petrosian. I was expecting another warm congratulations, but she had something else in mind. “Young man,” she said, “I feel sorry for you.” What? Sorry for me? Sorry for me? The youngest world champion in history, on top of the world? “I feel sorry for you,” she continued, “because the happiest day of your life is over.” Wow, I couldn’t believe it. What a thing to say. But as I got over my shock I began to wonder… what if she’s right? And while I did not think much more about it on that celebratory day, I slowly came to realize that Rona Petrosian had given me a new goal in my life: to prove her wrong! Now I realize she did me a favor that day, and so I will pass her gift on to you. Is the happiest day of your life over? Or do you already have a new dream, a new goal, a new plan? Graduation is about the future, and not just about your future. Few people expect to change the history of the world, but in some way you all will. It is up to you to decide if you will change the world with your presence – or if it will change in your absence. Watching the news, looking at the many problems and crises we face today, it’s easy to feel like a pessimist. Inequality is at record levels, there is uncertainty over the impact of all the new technology in our lives, there are worries about violence from terrorism and dictatorships. And although I spend a lot of my time analyzing and discussing these difficult issues, I am an optimist. I am an optimist because I believe we have the power to change things. We are not helpless spectators to economic cycles or the forces of history. We have the ability to take action, to change the course of the world. You, you all have that ability. By dreaming big and recapturing the spirit of risk and innovation we can do something about these problems instead of passively biding our time. Dreaming of changing the world means being prepared to take risks, to sacrifice, and to fail, and to try again. When I retired from professional chess ten years ago to join the pro-democracy movement in Russia, many people thought I was crazy. And some of them told me so! I was still the number one player in the world, after all, and challenging Vladimir Putin’s dictatorship was far more complex than the black and white world of the chessboard. Of course I understood this. In chess we have fixed rules and unpredictable results. In Putin’s Russia’s phony elections it’s exactly the opposite. I made this bold move because I realized that my own dream was not just about chess, but had always been about making a difference. I had accomplished everything I could in the world of professional chess, from world championship matches to battling against super-computers. I hoped I could still make a difference in Russia, and in human rights. I wanted to learn and contribute in other areas that fascinated me, like education, and human plus machine intelligence, and decision-making. I was 42 at the time, which tells you that it is never too late to dream. You often hear in chess and other sports that “this player is more talented” but “that player works harder.” This is a fallacy. Hard work is a talent. The ability to keep trying when others quit is a talent. And hard work is never wasted. No matter what career you end up in, or even if you have a dozen different careers, the hard work represented here today will never be wasted. Your being here shows that you have that talent and it will serve you well no matter how you decide to make a difference in this world. Human beings cannot upgrade our hardware, that’s our DNA. But with hard work we can definitely upgrade our mental software. But what is intelligence, education, and effort without the guiding hand of morality? 483 years ago today, on May 16, 1532, Thomas More resigned his position as Chancellor to the King of England, Henry VIII. Three years later More’s downfall was completed with his execution, when More said that he died “as the king’s good servant, but God’s first.” Thomas More was a complicated figure, a man of principle. As you might expect of a lawyer like More, in his novel Utopia he writes often of the law on his fictional perfect island. But instead of describing a flawless set of laws as he imagined them, More wrote that in an ideal society based on clear principles, many laws were not necessary. He wrote, “They have but few laws, and such is their constitution that they need not many.” And so More’s Utopia also had no lawyers. Don’t worry, I’m happy to tell those of you coming from Scott Hall today that a world with no lawyers is only possible in Utopia! How many laws we have is not the point. The world is a complicated place, far more complicated today than when Thomas More wrote his novel 500 years ago, and laws must keep up with the times. What has not changed, what should not change, what cannot change, is the need to base our laws, and our lives, and our dreams, on eternal human values. We can fight for our values or we can trade them away for comfort and temporary security. This is a challenge for all of us in today’s globally connected world. Every day we make choices large or small: individuals, companies, entire nations. Are those choices guided by the values we treasure? Are we loyal to the principles of individual freedom, of faith, of excellence, of compassion, of the value of human life? Or do we trade them away, bit by bit, for material goods, for a quiet life, and to pass the problems of today on to the next generation? These moral values are also the values of innovation and the free market, by the way. It is no coincidence that these founding American values created the greatest democracy in the world and also the greatest economy in the world. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus urged his believers to be a “City on a Hill”, a shining example to the world, a phrase used to describe America by John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. I saw that America from the other side of the Iron Curtain and I can tell you that it mattered. And it matters still. If America is to continue as a “light of the world” it will be up to you and to your generation to hold fast to these values and not to trade them away for a safe and stagnant status quo. Risk is not only for entrepreneurs. Risk is for anyone who will fight for these values in their lives and in the world every day. On my sixth birthday I woke up to find an enormous globe next to my bed. It was the best present I have ever received. I had to rub my eyes to make sure it was real. My favorite childhood stories were the ones my father read to me about the voyages of Marco Polo, Columbus, and Magellan. Our favorite game was to trace the journeys of these great explorers across the globe. These are the last and fondest memories I have of my father, and this love of exploration was his greatest gift to me. We have heard time and again that the frontiers have all been explored. And every generation likes to say that everything important or easy has already been invented. Unfortunately, believing this can become a self-fulfilling prophecy. If you think there is nothing new to discover, why try? Why take risks? Why leave the house? St. Louis was once the beginning of the unknown, the Gateway to the frontier. Imagine if the pioneers had stopped at the Mississippi, the way America hasn’t sent a man back to the moon since Eugene Cernan in 1972. We cannot turn back. We cannot stop. We must not settle for “good enough.” Life is more complicated today, yes, but our tools are infinitely more powerful. It’s easier today to reach Mars than it was to cross the oceans in the time of Thomas More. At least we know where we’re going and how far away it is. Columbus and Magellan had no maps while everyone here has GPS. Can you imagine Columbus trying to get venture capital today? You want to go where? You don’t know? You don’t have a map? Today, you all have a device in your pocket that can instantly communicate with half the people on the planet and access every piece of information in human history. One iPhone has more computing power than all the computers NASA had combined, back in 1972. But raw computing power isn’t enough. We need human creativity and human ambition to make a difference. There are still new frontiers today, and a limitless number of new inventions waiting to be discovered by people with the curiosity and courage to look for them, and the freedom to do so. It will require belief, hard work, and the values of innovation and liberty. It will require your belief, your hard work, and your ideas. You might say you aren’t ready for a new challenge right away, that you want time to relax, to celebrate, to rest on your new laurels. I’m sorry, but the world will not wait for you. The world needs you now. Today you have fulfilled one dream, and tomorrow you set course on a new one. If you always have a dream, the happiest day of your life is never over. Thank you and God bless. You may choose to agree/disagree with his political views,love/hate him but this guy is something. An inspiration to youngsters, a force of nature !!! :hatsoff:

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John Nash met Carlsen in Oslo, called him 'like Justin Bieber'. MC hates that comparison :cantstop:, everyone is trolling him these days. Nevertheless he is doing a great job at promoting the game especially in Nordic countries, similar to the Fischer boom in the US chess scene in 1972. http://www.nrk.no/kultur/her-moter-den-beromte-matematikeren-magnus-carlsen-1.12366522

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Viswanathan Anand plays exhibition match against Aamir Khan during the inauguration ceremony of the 3rd Maharashtra Chess League. Aamir Khan and Viswanathan Anand were invited over to inaugurate the 3rd edition of the Maharashtra Chess League. Aamir challenged the player to a game, which he willingly accepted. Knowing what he had got himself into Aamir was willing to go down with a crushing defeat. Some pics from the event HllF4Ce.jpg91sNj4G.jpg8ug4LJt.jpgrDKfijc.jpgweJUFNN.jpg8DGBkya.jpgQDSdMTv.jpgkg80nZY.jpgqF4kra3.jpg4BpQbYK.jpgNw4MgHA.jpg TRuadOqe_pU Aamir Khan-"I am a huge fan of Anand. The opportunity to play with one of my idols is something I would never let go off. I want to thank Vishy for being so nice to accept this game. I certainly do not deserve to play this game with him by any stretch of imagination." Khan revealed that his paternal grandma introduced him to chess when he was six years old. He said he would always try and find a way to play the game at the sets. Shammi Kapoor, Paresh Rawal, Ashutosh Gowariker and Katrina Kaif are some of the other industry stalwarts who play the game. Anand thanked Khan for promoting the game. He also joked how his little son would invariably dial the first number on his phone book and end up calling the actor at odd hours :cantstop:. Khan, who had white pieces, played the Ruy Lopez opening. Both players castled their kings on the opposite end very early in the game. Not surprisingly, Anand won in a little over 20 minutes. Anand interview after the ceremony to DNA: Where do you stand after two back-to-back world championship losses at the hands of Magnus Carlsen? This year, I am going to be playing only tournaments. The Candidates (the eight-player tournament conducted to determine the challenger for the next world championship) will take place next year. So, I am going to play in Norway, St Louis, London and, maybe, a fourth one in Dubai. At 45, what keeps you going? Deep down, do you still harbour dreams of winning a sixth world championship? I want to still challenge myself. I still like playing. I don't understand why I should stop. How tough is it to stay fit and focused than it was, say 10-15 years ago? I don't think it works like that. Yes, it does get harder. A lot of your rivals start to become much younger. But at the end of the day, it's just a game of chess and you have got to play well. We don't have to complicate the explanation. It's that simple. If you still go on and play a good game of chess, it has to work out. If it doesn't, then you have to find out why and try harder. That's roughly what I am doing. What do you do to stay in shape? I try to run every day or swim or go cycling. Recently, I joined this cycling group in Chennai. We do about 30-40 km every Sunday. That apart, I go for my long walks. Tell us more about cycling... We do different routes every Sunday. Actually, it's my brother-in-law (wife Aruna's brother) who got me into it. We do random routes every time. We tend to meet at Adyar or Madhya Kailash around 5 am. We do city tours early in the morning because it's cooler. Now, we have started doing the beach routes at ECR (East Coast Road) and OMR (Old Mahabalipuram Road). What's your bike? It's a Timber. It's quite enjoyable. You can keep a very good pace or you can relax by cycling steadily. But we negate all our efforts by going and having breakfast at Sangeetha (laughs). You have lived abroad. How important is it to have dedicated cycling lanes in our cities? This is kind of catching on. Of course, the mountains in Spain are much nicer than the crowded cities in India. But the first thing is that we must make a habit of cycling. Are you still into itelescope.net? Yes, I still take pictures (of faraway planets and stars using a telescope). I do it once every month. They have named a planet after me. It's located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even my son Akhil knows the number, 4538. How different is fatherhood now? Akhil is four now. He changes every year. Aruna says he can't take me seriously. To him, I am just a play partner. He just likes to have fun with me. Generally, if he sees me, he wants to play with me and throw pillows at me. Is he into chess? Well, he can tell you all the pieces, but he can't play yet. Bobby Fischer said once that theory is killing originality. Is this bad for chess? I don't think so. That said, there is a lot of theory in chess. But originality doesn't mean ignorance. Building on something that's already there is also originality. Do you continue to work towards the ultimate goal — becoming world champion again? It doesn't work that way. I can't just say I am looking at winning it. I have to take every tournament I play very, very seriously. How different was the Chennai loss from the Sochi loss? Did you take heart from Sochi because you ran Carlsen close? I have forgotten about it. I have played three or four tournaments after that defeat. You tend not to look back? I tend to look forward. I am focused on the tournaments I am playing or going to play. Are guys like Aronian and Nakamura in a position to threaten you at the Candidates? The qualifiers are still happening. I have qualified. The other seven slots are up for grabs. How important is it to have events like the Maharashtra Chess League? Every other sport has found that the league system works in India. In the MCL, we have six committed teams that have been here for three years already. That's 40-plus slots. This event is every interesting because anyone on any board can play anyone else on any other board I hope this catches on. Interview to TOI On the Grand Chess Tour... There is no indication of where the league is supposed to lead to. I have already been playing the London tournament for many years and the city has joined a new circuit of three tournaments. I am playing three good tournaments. I don't' see any other angle. Fide (World Chess Federation) did not block the individual tournaments, why should they block this? On his return to 2800+ club I have been missing 2800 for some time. I have been like a pendulum, going up and swinging back. I am happy that I have crossed 2804 On Carlsen's rating of ELO 2876 That is a huge number for Carlsen, it is impressive. But he has to score one point more than me in every tournament. That will be a challenge for him. On the possibility of Anand-Carlsen III I will play in this new circuit in Norway, US and London. I hope to play some other events till January by when I hope to know about the Candidates. At this stage, I am not thinking about the match (vs Carlsen), I still have to qualify. On how he keeps himself motivated in spite of being the 3rd oldest active player in the top 100 I am 45, nothing I can do about that. I enjoy chess as much as I did before. http://www.dnaindia.com/sport/interview-i-want-to-still-challenge-myself-viswanathan-anand-2088274 http://daily.bhaskar.com/news/ENT-BNE-oh-fresh-aamir-khan-surrenders-playing-chess-with-champion-viswanathan-anand-5001116-PHO.html http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/entertainment/hindi/bollywood/news/Viswanathan-Anand-plays-exhibition-match-against-Aamir-Khan/articleshow/47394086.cms http://www.mumbaimirror.com/sport/others/Dont-see-it-as-a-rebel-league/articleshow/47391998.cms http://www.deccanchronicle.com/150523/entertainment-bollywood/gallery/undefeated-bollywood-chess-champ-aamir-khan-gets-beaten

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Caruana Wins 2014-2015 GP, Qualifies For 2016 Candidates With Nakamura Z3cq4uh.jpg Anand,Caruana and Nakamura have booked their spots for Candidates 2016.:two_thumbs_up: Shaping out to be one hell of a line up. 5 more spots up for grabs.:cheer: oDmGaN7.jpgiJKjayR.jpg For those who are interested about the qualification procedure for the candidates:(Points listed in order of priority) 1. Runner of World Championship Match 2014(Anand) 2. World Cup 2015- Will be played in Baku, Azerbaijan this September. It will be a 128-player single-elimination chess tournament(knock out format). The finalists will qualify for the 2016 Candidates Tournament. For more info http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chess_World_Cup_2015. 3. FIDE Grand Prix 2014/15- Caruana and Nakamura qualified with Jakovenko 3rd & Tomashevsky 4th. In case Anand/Caruana/Naka win/are finalists in the World Cup then the qualification spots are given to the next players in the final standings of the Grand Prix. But historically those who have already qualified for the Candidates prefer to skip the World Cup to conserve energy/hide preparation. Will be very surprised if any of the 3 qualified players actually plays the World Cup. 4. Average FIDE Rating List of the 12 monthly lists starting from 1st January 2015 to 1st December 2015- 2 players qualify based on rating( except of course those who have already qualified by points 1,2 or 3). However a player can qualify by rating only if he participates in the World Cup 2015 or FIDE Grand Prix 2014/15(most top players fulfil this criteria). The player in question must also have played minimum 30 rated games in the 12 month period(again not a problem). Grischuk and Topalov are frontrunners to qualify through this criteria as things stand now(but Topalov must play the World Cup). 5. Organizer's nominee- must be rated at least ELO 2725 in the rating list of 1st July, 2015 For more on the World Chess Championship Cycle 2014-16 refer to: http://www.fide.com/FIDE/handbook/regscandidates2016.pdf http://www.chess.com/news/caruana-nakamura-qualify-for-2016-candidates-tournament http://en.chessbase.com/post/khanty-final-round-no-miracle

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Viswanathan Anand's mother Sushila passes away RIP :(( Anand's first chess teacher. She sacrificed so much for Vishy in his younger days when chess wasn't all that popular in India. An ideal sports person's mom, India salutes her for nurturing one of it's greatest champions. :isalute: In so many ways she is the mother of Indian chess. As a well respected Russian chess GM Shipov once said "without Anand it’s tough to imagine Indian chess, without his mother, it’s tough to imagine Anand" ZhvwjXt.jpgl9xV17s.jpgEeqCPle.jpgevCMW5r.jpg - Sushila Viswanathan, the mother of five-time world chess champion Viswanathan Anand passed away on May 26. She was 79. The last rites will be held at 10.00.A.M. on 28.05.2015 at Besant Nagar crematorium, Tamil Nadu. - Sushila hailed from a family of lawyers who played chess. Besides teaching him the basic moves, she played and nurtured him into a champion. Clearly she is a role model parent for the present generations. - While her husband K. Viswanathan was the General Manager of the Southern Railway, she also managed and helped the career of Anand. Shaping up Anand’s chess, his education in his formative years, her contribution towards chess was immense. - When she accompanied Anand to various events, like the Ahmedabad National ‘B’ in 1983, she sacrificed by staying in less comfortable accommodation that is hard to imagine today. Thanks to Anand, the profile of the game changed so much that the present generation of the chess players stand to gain from it. - “We recognized his talent at the right time,” said Sushila Viswanathan when Anand won the World Title for the first time in Tehran 2000. At that time she was 64. “Thrilled. Anand’s triumph did not come as a surprise for us.” She was sure that one day he is going to win the world title. - She was a perfect example for parental motivation. After Anand had lost the Sanghinagar Match in August 1994 to Gata Kamsky, she received him at the Chennai airport, as she had not come to Hyderabad. However, six months later, when Anand got another match against Kamsky at Las Palmas, Spain in March 1995, she ensured that she visited there, and this time the result was reverse! Anand came from a game down to win this match and emerge as World Championship challenger for the first time. - She leaves behind her husband K. Viswanathan, daughter and two sons of whom Anand is the youngest. In her death, chess has lost the biggest motivator Indian chess has seen. Indian chess fraternity mourns her death. http://www.mid-day.com/articles/viswanathan-anands-mother-sushila-passes-away/16246164 http://www.thehindu.com/sport/other-sports/viswanathan-anands-mother-passes-away/article7252466.ece http://en.chessbase.com/post/anand-s-mother-sushila-passes-away

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Devastated for Vishy. :((He was always so close to his mom. She was his first chess teacher, first manager, always accompanying him all across the country to support him. She sacrificed her law career for him. Won't be surprised is he takes a lay off from chess for a while.

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Biopic on Bobby Fischer going to be released on September 18th 2015. Pawn Sacrifice is an American biographical drama film directed by Edward Zwick and written by Steven Knight. The film stars Tobey Maguire(Spider Man :--D) as Bobby Fischer, Liev Schreiber as Boris Spassky(Sabre Tooth from X men), and Lily Rabe as Joan Fischer. The film is set to be released in the United States on September 18, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pawn_Sacrifice WS3h4E4.jpg xFHvH9FtACg Hope we can also have a biopic on Vishy Anand in India, Aamir can play Vishy. :dance: I mean if average sports persons like Milkha Singh, MaryKom, Saina, MSD, Azhar(fixer and traitor) can have movies based on their lives why not one celebrating one of our top 2/3 greatest sporting heroes?

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Nakamura joins Carlsen, Anand and Caruana in the 2800 club, first time in his life. Congrats to the American. :hatsoff: m1k8115.jpghttp://www.chess.com/article/view/chess-beach-body-ready Cartoon courtesy Jose Diaz. For more of his work http://www.diazcartoons.nl/?pagina_id=10&knop=06_01_6&modules_nr=06&module_06_02_id=2, those who follow chess news regularly will find the stuff really funny. :cantstop:

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European Women's Championship Classical won by the Ukranian Natalia Zhukova(Grischuk's wife, pictured below) pvXt3a0.jpghttp://en.chessbase.com/post/european-women-cc-is-won-by-natalia-zhukova Rapids won by former Women's World Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk(pictured below) 1cFV4S5.jpghttp://en.chessbase.com/post/acp-euro-women-rapid-won-by-kosteniuk

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Can America Return to Chess Glory? The US chess team may embark on a journey reminiscent of the golden past. Three extraordinary GMs – Fabiano Caruana, Hikaru Nakamura and Wesley So – are rated in the world's top. They are young, hungry and very good – and will be eligible to play in next year's Chess Olympiad. Huffington columnist asks: can they recreate the glory of the U.S. teams from the 1930s? Full article here http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lubomir-kavalek/can-america-return-to-che_b_7463728.html?ir=India&adsSiteOverride=in

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Jakovenko on how to beat Carlsen In a recent interview the Russian compared Magnus Carlsen to Bobby Fischer, explaining why the World Champion's style of play doesn’t work for other top players, and why beating Carlsen will require “a new Kasparov”. https://chess24.com/en/read/news/jakovenko-on-how-to-beat-carlsen

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Vachier-Lagrave Wins Opening Blitz As Norway Chess Takes Off The blitz tourney was to determine the pairings(since there are even number of players and it not being a double round robin, some will have an extra white). MVL, Carlsen, Nakamura,Anand,Giri to have an extra white for finishing among the top 5. Anand blew a completely winning position(Ouch) against Carlsen :facepalm:where the evals dropped from +12 to -12 after 1 particular move(44.f3 WTF !!!!) He gets some great positions against the Norwegian but finds ways to blow his position all the time. He needs a mental conditioning expert to counter the Carlsen jinx.hSfrzRH.jpg Anand beat Caruana, Grischuk, Aronian and Hammer while he lost to Giri and Carlsen. Overall finished with 5.5/9. Happy for him that he hasn't allowed the recent death of his mother affect his game badly though will wait for the main event to kick off to see whether he is in his normal fighting mode. Losing a near and dear one can be painful, when I lost someone close to me a few years back I couldn't get my life in order for almost a year. Today is the first round of the real event(classical) and will see Anand(white) taking on Caruana(black). Anand has whites against Caruana, Grischuk, Carlsen, MVL and Hammer. For the full pairings and schedule check this link.http://2015.norwaychess.com/official-pairings/ 1v0S901.jpg Player quotes(including by Kasparov who was there to kickstart the event), pics etc can be found in the below link. http://www.chess.com/news/vachier-lagrave-wins-the-blitz-as-norway-chess-takes-off-4378 Preview of the tournament https://chess24.com/en/read/news/10-questions-before-norway-chess-2015

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Horrible start for Carlsen, Anand thumps the Norwegian in emphatic fashion before the rest day First 4 rounds over. The lucky Bulgarian VeselinTopalov is in the lead with 3.5/4 while Carlsen is languishing at the bottom with 0.5/4 :omg: QRhuE2i.jpg The highlight until now has been the 1st round when Carlsen obtained a winning position against Topalov. But he wasn't aware of the time control in this event and was flagged on the 60th move. The Norwegian was about to win a “typical Carlsen game,” grinding down Topalov in a deep ending that earlier looked quite drawish. Then, suddenly he lost on time on move 60, not realizing that he wasn't getting extra time on the clock. The time control in Norway is 40 moves in 2 hours followed by 1 hour to finish the game, and 30 seconds per move from move 41. It's a bit of an odd combination of the classical time control and the FIDE time control, never used before at top events. It is mentioned in the players’ contract, and just to be sure, the chief arbiter announced it to the players at the start of the first round. However, one player arrived late for that first round: Magnus Carlsen.Carlsen said this in the TV2 studio where he joined the show for about 20 minutes despite the horrible experience at the board. He blamed himself, but also felt that the organizers could have made it more clear that they were using a completely new rate of play. Norway Chess is one of the few strong tournaments that does not have a technical meeting for the players before the start. “They are boring, but now we know why they exist,” Levon Aronian said. This was the board position at the time Carlsen lost. LIcYhsh.jpg The video capturing the precise moment(3:23 mark) S2clwhqlmYk The organizer later made an official apology for the mishap. http://2015.norwaychess.com/official-apology/ E82SvtfsNSk Results from Round 1 2DAsIpR.jpg In round 2 Caruana thrashed Carlsen with white. His preparation was top notch and right from the opening Carlsen was fighting a lost battle. A morale booster for Caruana who has been trounced by Carlsen for the last 12 months across various formats. Anand was winning at some point against Giri but misplayed the latter portion of the game which eventually fizzled out to a draw. S3uyx-l86PA Results from Round 2 f2Det8V.jpg In Round 3 again Anand misplayed a winning position to let Grischuk escape with a draw. Carlsen too was cruising against Giri only to blunder and allow the Dutchman to make a draw. Carlsen's negative record against Giri is a source of endless mirth to the young Dutchman who trolls the World Champion all the time. The earlier day he joked about how Magnus Carlsen was an easy opponent for him, how he would beat the hell out of him the next day and how he doesn't feel any sympathy for him after his unlucky loss to Topalov. After this miraculous escape Giri told the media "If he doesn't beat me here I think he'll never beat me! " :hysterical::hysterical: Anish Giri seems to have pissed off many Norwegians for making fun of Carlsen all the time. The event organizer Aulin-Jansson even said that he hoped Magnus would beat the **** out of Giri before their encounter. :cantstop: Results from Round 3 re5Pbgh.jpg Round 4 saw the most awaited match of the tournament. World Champion Magnus Carlsen renewed his storied rivalry with ex World Champion Vishy Anand and this time it was the Indian legend who came out on top in a complicated Breyer Ruy Lopez. The match was held in a Monastery and the confession innovation this tournament is experimenting with added the touch of humour. SxnAI2v.jpg uSrl4GjOJ08 One has to go back 10 years to find the last tournament where Carlsen had such a bad start. This was at Gausdal 2005 when Magnus was only 14 years old. In fact no World Champion in the last 90 years has had such a bad start to any tournament. Though to be fair he was crushing Topalov before tragedy struck in R1. Z6w1pZi.jpgSssmxDV.jpgy5uvdD4.jpgmkXunkR.jpgttH8R6Z.jpggK4ONpu.jpg Results from Round 4 t1b117U.jpgSources: http://en.chessbase.com/ https://chess24.com/en/read/news http://www.chess.com/

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m958Nwc.jpg

Happy 40th Birthday to the 14th World Champion in Chess and a true legend of the game, Vladimir Kramnik. :birthday: Hope you carry on playing splendid chess for a few more years. He gave a fascinating interview on this occasion to ChessPro(in Russian). Here is the original as well as English translation(courtesy Chess24). He explains why he’s not ready to quit chess just yet but is also unlikely to follow in the footsteps of his friend Vishy Anand. He also comes up with an all-time Top 10 of chess players(must see), reflects on his changing style and compares star players to composers(must see), noting Magnus is no Mozart but Kasparov could be Rammstein. Unmissable !!!! Russian: http://www.chesspro.ru/interview/kramnik_levin_interview English:https://chess24.com/en/read/news/vladimir-kramnik-it-turns-out-i-m-52-not-40

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Topalov wins Norway Chess Classic, Anand finishes second XaVhTUu.jpg hvtezHFn5FI Lucky Topalov, undeserved win against Carlsen followed by 2 freebies from Grischuk and Hammer. According to chess experts Anand and Nakamura played the best chess this event, especially Anand who was clinical and never was in trouble in any of the matches. Icing on the cake was his win over Magnus who had a horrible event. He even lost to his countryman Hammer(ELO 2677). It was Hammer's first classical win over his good friend and World Champion since 2000. Last time this happened(see pic below) APNOK2T.jpg Magnus had his worst event since the 2010 Chess Olympiad. His performance rating was 2693 and he lost 23 points. Clearly he doesn't like playing in Norway, he was ordinary in the last 2 editions(both won by Karjakin) and was unrecognizable here. Good for chess because his domination was frankly getting boring. :haha: Expect the Viking to come back hard in St Louis, feel sorry for those who will face his wrath in the coming matches. Overall Topalov, Anand ,Nakamura and Giri can be happy with their show here. Nakamura surprisingly has lost only 1 classical match whole year(to Vishy in Zurich). His rating is around 2810 and is playing with more restraint, his all out mindless aggression last 2 years were getting him nowhere. If only he can get rid of Carlsenphobia(he is 0-11 against the Viking in classical) he has good chances of becoming World Champ one day. Giri meanwhile continues to troll Magnus, he is enemy number 1 in Norway. :hysterical: His win over Topalov was a masterpiece, if only he plays more positively more often he could be a real contender for the throne. MVL and Hammer played according to their capabilities. Carlsen had a nightmare event. Caruana was underwhelming(-1 doesn't befit his caliber) and his rise last year looks very distant now. Grischuk and Aronian have been horrible this year after establishing themselves as top 5 players over the last 5 years. Hope they find form, especially Aronian who once again blew a promising position against Carlsen this time. Just last year people were talking about an Aronian-Carlsen title match and now this. These guys simply don't have the consistency that is required to be at top. WPvYjv9.jpgQhHxVMu.jpgwLA78tr.jpgRxjSZL4.jpgSeHOPIf.jpgGCUeQJj.jpgTun5NBD.jpg

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2015 CEZ Trophy won by Wesley So LTg0f5T.jpg Every year, the Prague Chess Society and CEZ have organized a match for their top Czech player, David Navara, often against opponents that outrank even him. Last year he lost to Nakamura in a lopsided match but the American is also world Top 3-4, not exactly lightweight. This year it was Wesley So, also challenging the establishment, and was a remarkable victory for the American(3-1 in his favor). Before this year Navara's record against other challengers: i77LWna.jpghttp://en.chessbase.com/post/2015-cez-trophy-won-by-wesley-so

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GM Walter Browne dies in his sleep at 66 OipF8Iv.jpg GM Walter Browne, born in Australia, was a six-time US Champion and eleven time winner of the National Open. He won the American Open seven times, the World Open three times, and the US Open Championship twice. On Wednesday night, after a tournament, a simul and a poker session in Las Vegas, Browne passed away suddenly. The chess world is shocked and saddened by this loss. Read more at: http://en.chessbase.com/post/walter-browne-dies-in-his-sleep-at-66 https://chess24.com/en/read/news/remembering-walter-browne http://www.chess.com/news/gm-walter-browne-1949-2015-3134

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Harikrishna Strongest At Edmonton International jms2H0i.jpg The 29-year-old Indian GM finished a point ahead of GMs Wang Hao, Surya Ganguly and Vassily Ivanchuk. :isalute: The participants were Vassily Ivanchuk (2733), Pentala Harikrishna (2733), Wang Hao (2704), Sam Shankland (2656), Surya Ganguly (2625), Aman Hambleton (2446), Vladimir Pechenkin (2314), Agnieszka Matras-Clement (2269), Dale Haessel (2180) and Robert Gardner (2133). TMioi7I.jpghttp://www.chess.com/news/harikrishna-strongest-at-edmonton-international-6763

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Abhijeet Gupta wins Commonwealth Chess Championship hit by big controversy

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:hatsoff:

On Tuesday GM Abhijeet Gupta won the Commonwealth Chess Championship in New Delhi. The 25-year-old Indian grandmaster “did a Caruana” as he won his first seven games. GM Humpy Koneru withdrew at the end of round four after “doing a Carlsen.” She lost on time as she was unaware of the time control. Her appeal against the arbiter’s decision was turned down. The 2015 Commonwealth Chess Championship was held 23-30 June, 2015 at Hotel Park Plaza in Shahdara, New Delhi, India. It was organized by the Delhi Chess Association under auspices of the All India Chess Federation (AICF) and on behalf of the Commonwealth Chess Association (CCA). Founded in 1980, the CCA unites the 54 commonwealth chess federations. Its main activity is the annual Commonwealth Championship. Held in its capital, this year's tournament saw a huge majority of players from India: 260 out of a total 298 in the main group. However, the top 7 wasn't there: Vishy Anand, Pentala Harikrishna, Parimarjan Negi, Santosh Gujrathi Vidit, Krishnan Sasikiran, Baskaran Adhiban and Surya Ganguly. The countries represented in the tournament were Australia (2 players), Bangladesh (6), England (1), India (260), Malaysia (1), Maldives (2), New Zealand (2), Pakistan (6), South Africa (13), Sri Lanka (4) and Zambia (1). It was GM Abhijeet Gupta who stole the show in New Delhi. Although his opponents were all lower rated, let's call it “a Caruana” anyway: Gupta won his first seven games! The top seed finished with two quick draws to end on 8.0/9 and a 2735 performance rating. He took home 150,000 rupees (a bit more than 2,000 Euros). Three players finished on 7.5/9: Arghyadip Das, Babu Lalith and M.R. Deepan Chakkravarthy J. “I guess I was doing well right from the start. I got off with some victories and it was nice to win seven games in a row,” said Gupta. “I could not remember the last time I did that in any international event.” A winner always has a bit of luck, and for Gupta it came in the fourth round. His opponent Ramnath Bhuvnesh forgot to press his clock in the final moments of the game, and was declared lost on time. Gupta was a pawn down but position was probably drawn. One could say that losing on time was the theme of the tournament. There were two incidents similar to what happened to Magnus Carlsen at Norway Chess recently. In round four GM Humpy Koneru, the world #3 in the women's rating list, let her time run out in a winning position against IM Himanshu Sharma. The arbiter declared her game lost. Remarkably, the very same thing had happened to WGM Tania Sachdev in the first round of the tournament, which Humpy was unaware of. Humpy appealed, and when the appeals committee turned down her appeal, she decided to withdraw from the event. In the women's section, Padmini Rout won the gold medal and the 20,000-rupee first prize (280 Euros). The championship has been sub-divided in to separate categories for under-8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 age groups for boys and girls. The under-18 and under-20 titles were merged in the open section. A total of 564 players registered for the event.
CSHGijZ.jpghttp://www.chess.com/news/commonwealth-gupta-doing-a-caruana-koneru-sachdev-doing-a-carlsen-9745

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Yu Yangyi Wins Capablanca Memorial With Round To Spare 76uddwP.jpg Very impressive by the Chinese man. :two_thumbs_up:

Yu Yangyi won the Elite Group of the 50th Capablanca Memorial in Havana, Cuba. The 21-year-old Chinese grandmaster secured victory in the penultimate round and finished on 7.0/10. José Raúl Capablanca y Graupera passed away 8 March 1942. Since 1962, when Ernesto “Che” Guevara took the initiative to commemorate the great Cuban player, an annual memorial is held in Havana. The 50th edition just finished. In recent years the festival has consisted of an open tournament and two round-robin groups, with international top players featuring in the top group — a six-player double round-robin. The 2015 “Elite Group” had, in order of the final standings, GMs Yu Yangyi (2715, China), Dmitry Andreikin (2718, Russia), Pavel Eljanov (2718, Ukraine), Leinier Dominguez (2746, Cuba), Ian Nepomniachtchi (2720, Russia) and Lazaro Bruzon (2677, Cuba). Yu won the tournament convincingly, starting with 4.5/5 and finishing with 7.0/10. The Chinese player ended 1.5 points ahead of Andreikin and Eljanov. Top seed Dominguez finished on a disappointing fourth place with a minus one and 2675 performance. The “Premier Group,” a ten-player round-robin, was won by GM Vitaly Kunin of Germany. His 6.5/9 was also 1.5 points more than the number two. GMs Jan-Krzysztof Duda, Yusnel Bacallao and Isan Reynaldo Ortiz scored 5.0./9. The 50th Capablanca Memorial took place 15-25 June, 2015 in Havana. The time control was 90 minutes for 40 moves followed by 30 minutes to finish the game, with 30 seconds increment from the start.
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