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Recent chess interviews Vladimir Kramnik: “I’m a bohemian” https://chess24.com/en/read/news/vladimir-kramnik-i-m-a-bohemian Leinier Domínguez: “I’m not Carlsen or Caruana” https://chess24.com/en/read/news/leinier-dominguez-i-m-not-carlsen-or-caruana Vallejo Paco: Players rated 2600-2720 are in limbo https://chess24.com/en/read/news/vallejo-players-between-2720-and-2600-are-in-a-kind-of-limbo

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Karpov defeats Sveshnikov in match

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Two chess legends met in a rapid chess match in Riga, Latvia from July 7 to July 9. Twelfth World Champion Anatoly Karpov faced the renowned chess theoretician Evgeny Sveshnikov in a six-game match that played over three days. Karpov won 4-2 http://en.chessbase.com/post/karpov-defeats-sveshnikov-in-match http://www.chess.com/news/karpov-beats-sveshnikov-4-2-in-rapid-match-1380

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Danzhou: Wang Yue wins with 2887 performance

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People were predicting victory in this Chinese tournament by top seed Ding Liren, or by the recently successful Yu Yangyi. After a stunning game in round two many switched to 16-year-old Wei Yi. But as the tournament progressed it was the experienced 28-year-old GM Wang Yue who began to score one victory after another and win the tournament.

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Sasi had a subpar event. The younger generation of Chinese players are looking better than the Russians atm. http://en.chessbase.com/post/danzhou-wang-yue-wins-with-2887-performance http://www.chess.com/news/wang-yue-returns-to-former-greatness-shines-in-danzhou-3826

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Artemiev earns showdown with Russia’s best 6sNChDq.jpg 17-year-old Vladislav Artemiev has won the Russian Higher League in Kaliningrad, earning the chance to take on Svidler, Karjakin and co. in the Russian Championship next month. 2014 European Champion Alexander Motylev finished second, while otherwise it was a triumph for youth, with qualification spots also going to Russian Junior Champion Ivan Bukavshin (20), Ildar Khairullin (24) and Daniil Dubov (19). Watch out for this kid, he has it in him to shake up the elite. https://chess24.com/en/read/news/artemiev-earns-showdown-with-russia-s-best

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Baskaran Adhiban wins XXXV Benasque Open

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How the hell are Tamilians so good at chess? Look at all our chess masters, Noble laureates, mathematicians, top scientists and engineers..........just like Jewish domination, in India we have Tamil domination(esp Brahmins from TN) http://en.chessbase.com/post/adhiban-wins-xxxv-benasque-open

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China beats Russia

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In the traditional match between China and Russia the Chinese celebrated a double victory and confirmed their status as a new chess superpower. The Chinese men won 14-11, and the Chinese women, who were nominally weaker than the Russian women, had a strong finish and won 15-10. The Russian men were without Kramnik, Grischuk, Karjakin, Nepo and Moro, so they never really had any chance against the Chinese men. But to see the Russian women(3 continuous Olympiad golds !!!) so thoroughly outclassed by China (without Hou,Zhao and Wenjun) was surprising. http://en.chessbase.com/post/china-beats-russia

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Vaishali wins Indian Women Challengers Most of the strongest female players of the country took part in this beautifully staged event. The nine top finishers qualify for the National Premier Championship in October 2015. The winner ahead of a host of experienced IMs and WGMs was a 14-year-old girl from Chennai. R. Vaishali scored at 9.0/11, gaining 80 rating points.

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Another Tamil chess champion !!!!:cantstop: Detailed report here http://en.chessbase.com/post/vaishali-wins-indian-women-challengers

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Historic Chess Footage Revealed As AP, Movietone Launch YouTube Channels The Associated Press and British Movietone have released many, many hours of their old footage to the web, and there's a good deal of chess footage included. 1. Jose Raul Capablanca & Salo Flohr giving a simul. 2. Boris Spassky interviewed after losing the 1972 match to Bobby Fischer. 3. Anatoly Karpov giving a simul in 1977; opponents include a very young Nigel Short. 4. A long (14 minute) report on the then-ongoing world championship match between Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi in Baguio City in 1978. There are some mistakes made by the commentators; for instance, at one point they refer to Korchnoi as having a 4-2 lead, when in fact it was the other way around. 5. Footage of Tigran Petrosian and Boris Spassky, from their first world championship match in 1966. 6. Also from the great (chess) year of 1966: footage from the Havana Olympiad, including the draw between Fischer and Spassky. 7. More Spassky: six minutes or so of footage from Hastings 1965/66. Spassky went +6 but only tied for first with Wolfgang Uhlmann, a point and a half ahead of Vasiukov and two points in front of Gligoric and Pfleger. 8. More Hastings: the next year's event featured Mikhail Botvinnik (who won with 6.5/9) and a very young Henrique Mecking; Uhlmann came in second this time http://www.chess.com/news/historic-chess-footage-revealed-as-ap-movietone-launch-youtube-channels-3065

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Album 61 - An intimate award-winning documentary The year was 2010. Boris Gelfand had ascended the massive world championship ladder to earn the right to battle Vishy Anand for the title. His entire life had been dedicated to making this moment possible. A camera crew followed him throughout the match, filming the drama involving not only him and his team, but all those who helped him prepare the way. A fascinating documentary. http://en.chessbase.com/post/album-61-an-intimate-award-winning-documentary

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An hour-long lecture by Vishy Anand Earlier this year Vishy Anand gave a lecture at the Indian Institute of Technology Madras in his native city now known as Chennai. The video has just been published on YouTube, allowing us to watch as the multiple World Champion is greeted by rapturous applause and goes on to describe his career, all the way from his sudden rise from nowhere to Indian no. 4 as a 13-year-old to his most recent successes. Highlights include assessments of Anatoly Karpov and Magnus Carlsen. https://chess24.com/en/read/news/an-hour-long-lecture-by-vishy-anand

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Magnus Carlsen proposes changes in WCh

In advance of travelling to the US to prepare for the Sinquefield Cup, I felt it important to share with you something I have been thinking about a great deal: the World Championship cycle format. I want to preface what I’m about to say with the notion that I have great respect and reverence for all the World Champions that have come before me, and for those that have contributed to the professionalization of chess. The Chennai match against V. Anand and our subsequent match in Sochi were both equally powerful and wonderful experiences. I was amazed by the intensity of the match format, as well as the massive interest from both the media and the public. I know people are working diligently to organize the 2014-2016 World Championship cycle, and I very much look forward to the match in November 2016 against the winner of the spring 2016 Candidates tournament. Despite this, I have, for a long time believed - and voiced publicly - that there should be a new World Championship cycle system, which is both balanced and fair. Those of you who have followed top level chess closely for years will remember that I openly raised the issue of the privileges held by the World Champion on several occasions, prior to qualifying for the match in 2013. In short, I strongly believe the chess world should evolve to a more just system. What does that look like? I have long thought that moving to an annual knock-out event, similar to the World Cup, would be more equitable. This change would in effect improve the odds of becoming World Champion for nearly every chess player, with the exception of the reigning World Champion, and potentially a few other top players who would no longer be favoured by the current format. Creating regional qualifying events combined with rating spots, the participation of all the top players in the world and the undisputed World Championship title at stake, I truly believe this would make the World Championship cycle more accessible to everyone. In conclusion, I strongly recommend FIDE look into modernizing the World Championship cycle format. What are your thoughts? Do you agree that the Chess World Championship cycle would benefit from a new system?
https://www.facebook.com/magnuschess?fref=ts

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FIDE Announces Women's Grand Prix Series 2015-2016: Four Stages from Monte Carlo to China

FIDE has announced the 2015-16 women's Grand Prix series, the results of which will determine one participant in the 2017 world championship match. Dates and venues for the four stages: 2-16 October 2015 - Monte Carlo, Monaco February 2016 - Kish, Iran May 2016 - Tbilisi, Georgia July 2016 - Chengdu, China 16 players will take part, ten by qualifying, four nominated by the organisers and two chosen by the FIDE President. Here are the ten who already have the right to play in the series, from whom FIDE is awaiting signed contracts: Mariya Muzychuk (world champion 2015 in Sochi) Natalya Pogonina (runner-up in 2016 world championship) Pia Cramling (semifinalist in world championship) Harika Dronavalli (semifinalist in world championship) Hou Yifan (here and below, on average rating Aug 2014 - July 2015) Humpy Koneru Nana Dzagnidze Xu Wenjun Anna Muzychuk Valentina Gunina First reserve - Alexandra Kosteniuk (also on average rating) .
http://chess-news.ru/en/node/19756

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