Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
KeyboardWarrior

Pakistan Discussion Thread

Recommended Posts

Ayesha Farooq, first to pass qualifying tests for combat, says she will do "same activities" as male colleagues. Ayesha Farooq pakistans-first-female-fighter-pilot-ayesha-farooq.jpg20570905.cms Pakistan's first war-ready female fighter pilot has said she is ready to defend her country, and sees no difference between herself and her male colleagues when it comes to "precision bombing". Ayesha Farooq, from Punjab province's city of Bahawalpur, is one of 25 women who have become pilots in the Pakistan Air Force over the last decade. Out of the 25, there are five other female fighter pilots who have yet to take the final tests to qualify for combat, news agencies said on Thursday. Non-fighter pilots fly slower aircraft, ferrying troops and equipment around the country. "I don't feel any different. We do the same activities, the same precision bombing," the 26-year-old said of her male colleagues at Mushaf base in north Pakistan. REUTERS0ZOH19_PAKISTAN-AIRFORCE-WOMEN_0612_11332779_wa.jpgINT_PAKISTAN_FIGHTER_PKG_13-06_00000.jpg growing number of women have joined Pakistan's defence forces in recent years as attitudes towards women change. Saab+2000+Airborne+Early+Warning+and+Control+Aircraft+erieye+aewc+awacs+pakistan+air+force+paf+jf-17+thunder+f-16+fighter+jet+fc20+j10.jpg "Because of terrorism and our geographical location it's very important that we stay on our toes," said Farooq, referring to Taliban fighting and a sharp rise in sectarian violence. Deteriorating security in neighbouring Afghanistan, where US-led troops are preparing to leave by the end of next year, and an uneasy relationship with India, add to the mix. Farooq was at loggerheads with her widowed mother seven years ago when she said she wanted to join the air force. pakistan-female-fighter-pilot.jpg3371250794_ca15e7c6d9.jpg "In our society most girls don't even think about doing such things as flying an aircraft," she said. Family pressure against the traditionally male-dominated armed forces dissuaded other women from taking the next step to become combat ready, air force officials said. "More and more ladies are joining [the force] now," said Nasim Abbas, Wing Commander of Squadron 20, made up of 25 pilots, including Farooq, who fly Chinese-made F-7PG fighter jets. pakistan-f-16.jpgcD04Y2E4MGViOTRhYmZiM2I0YmY3Nzk0YjQzYTNhZWE2NCZnPWEwN2FiNDU2MWMwYTE5YTIyNDkxMGI2MWM4ZTJhNmM2 "It's seen as less of a taboo. There's been a shift in the nation's, the society's, way of thinking," Abbas told Reuters news agency on the base in Punjab's Sargodha district. There are now about 4,000 women in Pakistan's armed forces, largely confined to desk jobs and medical work. 640x392_55491_102382.jpgart.pakistan.female.pilot.1.cnn.jpg3878358887_75ef95271b.jpg But over the last decade, women have become sky marshals, defending Pakistan's commercial liners against insurgent attacks, and a select few are serving in the elite anti-terrorist force. Like most female soldiers in the world, Pakistani women are still banned from ground combat. refueling-aircraft.jpg Pakistan now has 316 women in the air force compared to around 100 five years ago, Abbas said. "In Pakistan, it's very important to defend our front lines because of terrorism and it's very important for everyone to be part of it," said avionics engineer Anam Hassan, 24, as she set out for work on an F-16 fighter aircraft. nida_2.jpgayesha-2.jpg:hatsoff:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First Pakistani Woman to earn PhD in Astrophysics First Pakistani Woman to earn PhD in Astrophysics IMG_20120726_140739.jpg KARACHI: One would expect Mariam Sultana, the first Pakistani woman to earn a PhD in astrophysics, to be admired and revered by her students. Instead, she finds herself warding off the invective heaped on her and clearing the misconception that she has studied astrology, a pseudoscience which is considered haram. “The students somehow confuse my field of study, extragalatic astronomy, with fortune telling or palm reading,” she told The Express Tribune. “Their parents do the same thing and advise their children to stay away from the subject.” After working assiduously for almost six years, 30-year-old Sultana, a lecturer at the mathematical sciences department of the Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology (FUUAST), earned her PhD a week ago. When she started her coursework back in 2006, she was a research associate at Karachi University’s (KU) Institute of Planetary Astrophysics. She explained that the goal of extragalactic astrophysics is to understand the formation of planetary systems, stars and galaxies which are embedded in the cosmic web. Her work was supervised by Dr Salakhutdin Nuritdinov, a professor at the National University of Uzbekistan. He was appointed in 2006 to FUUAST through the Higher Education Commission’s (HEC) foreign faculty hiring programme. Dr Nuritdinov is a pioneer in the field and allowed Sultana to further develop mathematical models that he had created. “I didn’t feel worthy enough to do such high standard work,” said Sultana. “It was Dr Nuritdinov who led me all the way through.” In her thesis, she investigated the instabilities and physical conditions which gave galaxies their ring shape. Sultana was thrilled when two eminent professors agreed to become examiners for her doctoral thesis. One of them was James Binney, a professor of physics at the University of Oxford. He also heads the Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics. The second examiner was Dr Ana Katrin Schenk, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of California. Dr Binney wrote to her and said that “[sultana’s] thesis represents a considerable body of work, and from a technical aspect, it is surely worthy of a doctorate.” Sultana plans to pursue a postdoctoral fellowship in the United Kingdom. “But first I want to supervise all the PhDs which were left incomplete because of Dr Nuritdinov’s departure from Pakistan,” she said. She is currently supervising the doctoral students at FUUAST’s mathematical sciences department. :hatsoff:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Team Pakistan sweeps debating competition in Mexico The team beat South Korea in the finals. Two team members, Zainab Hameed and Azeem Liaquat, bagged the first and second position respectively as the best speakers at the competition while the third member, Ahmed Shujaan, scored the fifth position. 416178-StudentPHOTOSCOURTESYIDEA-1343845848-667-640x480.jpg KARACHI: For the three 15-year-old students selected to represent Pakistan in one of the largest high school tournaments in the world, The Karl Popper Debating Championship (KPDC), the first-time visit to Mexico became their time to shine. Not only did the Pakistani team win the final against the team from South Korea, but all three participants were listed in the top 10 speakers of tournament. The titled was achieved after winning through 6 preliminary rounds, 3 elimination rounds and the grand final. Karachi Grammar School student Zainab Hameed was named the top speaker of the competition while Azeem Liaquat, student of the Salamat International Campus for Advanced Studies in Lahore, came second. Their compatriot, Ahmed Shujaan from the Aitchison College, was not far behind either and bagged the fifth position among more than 200 participants. Teams from 45 countries came together to debate on a mix of prepared and impromptu motions. The event was a part of the 18th edition of the International Debate Education Association (IDEA) Youth Forum held in Mexico from July 2 to 15. This topic for the KPDC finals was “Guantanamo Bay prison should be closed down immediately”. Team Pakistan was defending the motion while team Korea had the burden to prove that the motion should not be adopted. The teams participated in two competitions –the KPDC and the mixed team track. In the former, they represented Pakistan as a team while in the former, they were split up and paired with debaters from other countries. First time for everything “It was the first time that Pakistan participated but it was also the first time that any team won with all nine votes of the judges in its favour,” said team Pakistan’s coach, Daniyal Asad, also the general secretary of the Debating Society of Pakistan. Asad also won the best coach cum adjudicator award. A two-day selection camp, comprising the top 20 speakers at the “Under-17 Pakistan National Debating Championship”, was arranged by the Debating Society of Pakistan in Lahore. The participants were primarily the O’ level or matriculation students out of which Zainab, Ahmed and Azeem were selected. Asad told The Express Tribune that the society has been running the debating circuit across the country successfully for the past 20 years without help from the government. “Some form of patronage from the government would have helped in grooming the talent.” The expenses of trip were paid by the US-based Open Society Foundations. Team effort After being selected for the competition, a five-day training camp was organised by the debating society in Lahore, following which they continued to research and collaborate for about two weeks through online mediums because Zainab was in Karachi while the other two participants were based in Lahore. “We had a lot of team chemistry right off the bat and that was probably the main reason that we were successful,” said Zainab. She gave credit to the coach and other trainers for strenuously helping them all the way through. “We didn’t actually have a lot of knowledge about topics like civil liberties and terrorism,” said Zainab while talking about the competition’s theme. “We didn’t even know that the Guantanamo Bay is actually a legal black hole but we had to defend the motion in the finals.” Zainab recaps that the moment their victory was announced, everybody except for the three stunned team members were cheering them on while chanting “Pakistan… Pakistan”. “It was not only a competition but also a great learning experience during which we got to prove our talent,” said Ahmed. He recalled one of the most memorable moments for the team when the three performed “bhangra” in traditional Pakistani outfits at the talent night. :two_thumbs_up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pakistan Army: First female paratroopers make history A total of 24 lady officers successfully completed the course at Parachute Training School, Peshawar. 576801-ParatroopersISPR-1373793169-613-640x480.jpg ISLAMABAD: The first group of female paratroopers completed their training on Sunday, the military announced, hailing it as a “landmark achievement.” egy%5Bpt-army-2_11270_9578.jpg A total of 24 lady officers of Pakistan Army successfully completed the course at Parachute Training School, Peshawar. 5964_8_20_2013_5.gif Chief of Army Staff General Ashfaq Pervez Kayani congratulated all the lady officers and their training staff on successful completion of the course. pakpara2.jpg Captain Kiran Ashraf was declared the best paratrooper of the batch, the military said in a statement, while Captain Sadia, referred to by one name, became the first woman officer to jump from a MI-17 helicopter. 4259.jpg After three weeks’ basic airborne training, which included exit, flight and landing techniques, the new paratroopers completed their first jump on Sunday and were given their “wings” by the commander of Special Services Group, Major General Abid Rafique, the military said. women-paratroopers-pakistan.jpg In 2006, seven women broke into one of Pakistan’s most exclusive male clubs to graduate as fighter pilots – perhaps the most prestigious job in the powerful military and for six decades closed to the fairer sex. Naima+Gul+Thalassaemia+patient+becomes+first+Female+Pilot+in+Pakistan+Army+Aviation%25E2%2580%2599s+History+%25282%2529.jpg :hatsoff:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
http://www.thestar.com.my/Sport/Hockey/2013/08/30/Pakistan-fail-to-qualify-for-2014-World-Cup.aspx http://sports.yahoo.com/news/cricket-zimbabwe-beat-pakistan-first-time-15-years-160800990.html
Pakistan fail to qualify for the first time for the Hockey World Cup since 1971
Cricket-Zimbabwe beat Pakistan for first time in 15 years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pakistan fail to qualify for the first time for the Hockey World Cup since 1971
Cricket-Zimbabwe beat Pakistan for first time in 15 years
:cantstop: :cantstop:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pakistan fail to qualify for the first time for the Hockey World Cup since 1971
Black Day for Pakistan's Hockey... A team that won most number of World Cups could not even qualify for next... What a shame, politics and corruption in "Pakistan Hockey Federation" have totally ruined this Pakistan's National Sports :(( Thanks God we don't have to play qualifying tournaments for Cricket World Cup :winky:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pakistani nurse wins global award for excellence in neonatal nursing Anila Ali Baradi, the first Pakistani nurse to win this coveted award 1236486_1433858923506078_1206737644_n.jpg KARACHI: Anila Ali Bardai of the Aga Khan University Hospital received the award for excellence in neonatal nursing at the opening ceremony of the 8th International Conference of the Neonatal Nurses held at the Waterfront Hotel in Belfast, Ireland, said a communication received here on Monday. nurse-anila-ali-bardai.jpg1235946_1433859130172724_515511481_n.jpgCOINN_Awards_Slideshow1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
First time 4 threads created by the same person have been merged. Maybe it deserves another thread :idea:
I remember sir john's threads were regularly compiled into digests for the sake of readers. :hatsoff:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mountaineer Samina Baig has become the first Pakistani woman to scale Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain with a peak at 8,848 metres.
http://tribune.com.pk/story/551508/samina-baig-first-pakistani-woman-to-scale-mount-everest/ 551508-saminabaigmirzaalieverest-1368963271-302-640x480.jpg935767_537319596306101_1413705377_n.jpgmirza-samina.jpg249190_379475058836979_2141914789_n.jpgSamina Baig on right side, with Malala 971688_154324024747662_428244311_n.jpg20101126xsamina.jpg20100924xsaminasummit.jog.jpg :two_thumbs_up:
Pakistan, India flags fly together Indian twin sisters Tashi and Nugshi were also at the top of the Everest with Baig and Ali. By hoisting Pakistani and Indian flags side by side, the four South-Asians hoped to spread the message of Pak-India peace and friendship.
551374_537321219639272_1903450787_n.jpg943103_540162019355192_374450286_n.jpgmirza-3.jpg :nice: P.S: this one is old news. forgot to add in the thread ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pakistan has marked victory in International Cyber Drill Competition

Pakistan has marked victory in International Cyber Drill Competition, the competition was based on tricks and techniques regarding ” Cyber Security and how to secure systems from hackers and hack attacks”. Pakistan took part in the drill for the first time and beaten experts from 28 other countries LAHORE – IFTIKHAR ALAM - For the first time in the country’s history an eight member team of computer experts has participated in an international cyber drill and completed all the tasks successfully, various social websites and blogs reported here on Wednesday. The Pakistani team won the competition held in Kuala Lumpur Malaysia, where 25 teams of experts from 20 countries participated, it was informed. The Pakistani team comprised four members of Pakistan Information Security Association and four students of National University of Science and Technology. The event was organised by the Asia Pacific Computer Emergency Response Team (APCERT). The annual drill was held to test the response capability of leading Computer Security Incident Response Teams from Asia Pacific economies. It was the first time that APCERT involved the participation from the Organization of the Islamic Cooperation – Computer Emergency Response Team (OIC-CERT) in the annual drill, following a Memorandum of Understanding on collaboration signed in September. The objective was for participating teams to exercise incident response handling arrangements locally and internationally to mitigate the impact of advance persistent threats that involved large scale malicious software propagation and attacks capable of impairing the critical infrastructure and economic activities. The main focus of the event was to educate the participants, who were given specific task to complete them within a time limit. The exercise reflected a strong collaboration amongst the economies, and it also enhanced the communication protocols, technical capabilities and quality of incident responses for assuring Internet security and safety. About 22 CSIRT teams from Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, People’s Republic of China, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Macao, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam, Tunisia, Egypt and Pakistan participated in the drill. Courtesy : Daily Nation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest News Mohsin Ali 8 year old boy has Attempt the Record of Climbing 6050 Meters high peak of Minglik

Mohsin Ali , a 8-year-old boy, from Shimshal Valley has attempt the record of climbing 6050 meters high peak of Minglik at Shimshal Valley, Pakistan.
8b5a63972cf8a4ceea305aef44645f31_M.jpg Video in the link: http://www.suchtv.pk/entertainment/item/8693-hunza-boy-climbs-6-050-metre-peak-sets-a-world-record.html :two_thumbs_up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
^ mountain climbing is child harassment ? I mean no one forced him to climb the mountain ... the video in your link can be the child labor/children soldiers category ...
No one has to force, but taking a child to climb a mountain amounts to endangerment. Children till 13 don't have the right mind to know what is good or bad for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
^ There are so many 4-5 year old kids I've seen while hiking. Some of them will develop an early interest and graduate to mountaineering. When attempted with proper training and equipment' date=' mountaineering is just like any other sport.[/quote'] Extreme reaction maybe. Hiking is different from mountaineering (with need for oxygen etc.) But a lot of parents (like the crazy ones in the video posted) do push their kids to do extraordinary stuff without realizing it's odd for young kids to do such stuff. WHat's to say whether kids enjoy doing it. They might do a lot of such things because they want to keep their parents happy or impress them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Extreme reaction maybe. Hiking is different from mountaineering (with need for oxygen etc.) But a lot of parents (like the crazy ones in the video posted) do push their kids to do extraordinary stuff without realizing it's odd for young kids to do such stuff. WHat's to say whether kids enjoy doing it. They might do a lot of such things because they want to keep their parents happy or impress them.
It's possible that this particular kid might have been pushed - that certainly is not right. And I also agree that kids should be doing this only with their interest, not to mention proper precautions and training. But to demand a blanket action against all parents is not right either. PS: Oxygen will not be needed for a 6000 meter peak. I have no idea of the difficulty level of this particular peak, but when I was in California there was news of some 8-9 year old kids climbing Shasta every year, which though difficult by hiking standards is not really a technical climb. If the peak does not involve any free climbing and oxygen use, I don't think it's any more of a physical risk than the tough regimens kids follow in gymnastics and swimming, for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Asim said:

Never bothered to watch shows of this anchor, Im not sure he's still same or what but had worst ethics when up "against" any Pak guest... He thinks "Not giving any free second to respond = making them speechless"...

He is among the best anchors. That is his style.  He does not accept people going off topic, not being to the point, making speeches, not being factual, etc.

 

PS below he takes on VVIP culture:

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by rett

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back on topic:

Link  - Debate: #FreeBalochistan: Global movement to expose Pakistan

 

Must watch :hatsoff:  .... Highlights:

  • Atrocities carried out by Pak in Balochistan (Equivalent to exploitation of Jews by Nazi Germany)
  • What a proud Baloch calls Pak generals
  • The definition of Baloch in many of the school text books in Pak

 

 

Edited by rett

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How is he the best anchor when he does not even allow people to express their opinion and debate? Just shouting and forcing your views on others does not make someone a good anchor

8 hours ago, tdigi said:

I don't like Arnab Goswami's style. Raises his voice and shouts too much during live debates. Here's an interview he conducted with Raj Thackeray. Arnab had no chance here.... :cantstop:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1xAuuh58Fc

He has always been polite in all his one on one interviews

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...