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  1. 6 points
    Virat Kohli has recently completed 50 ODI’s as skipper of India. The results are mighty impressive. They’ve won every 4 out of 5 ODI’s with Kohli as skipper. They have been dominant at home, had a great run in Champions Trophy, and treated RSA like a school team in RSA’s own backyard. Bowlers have finally figured out how to take wickets during the middle portions of the game, Captain possesses two skilled slog-over bowlers and a very confident all-rounder who brings a lot of balance to the side. However, the side is far from perfect and this article highlights some of the areas that India needs to improve on before the World Cup. Normal wisdom suggests that you would want every player to have 30-50 ODI’s under their belt prior to World Cup but I disagree. Good players will shine regardless. New players bring a bit of a mystery factor and new levels of energy for high-octane tournaments. India’s IPL tournament prepares these players for big stages and selectors shouldn’t put too much emphasis on experience factor. Lower/Middle order India’s top 3 are arguably collectively biggest batting threat in one-day cricket but as the final of the Champions Trophy demonstrated if these three go cheaply, India’s lower middle doesn’t look capable of mastering tricky chases. To be honest, the top 3 have enjoyed the best of batting conditions and hogged the majority of the strike preventing the lower middle order from getting valuable match experience. Number 4 and 5 in one-day line-ups are still up for grabs. KL Rahul is still trying to figure out his role in ODI set-up. Raina is a fighter but he is technically limited. The tail is a bigger worry. With the exception of Bhuvneshwar, India has three genuine number 11 batsmen. In this era of batting deep, India over-relies on the top 7 for the bulk of heavy lifting. Elephant in the room Any sane selection committee would have ensured Dhoni is collecting his pension by now but he is guaranteed a spot in final XI for the World Cup. Given his street smartness, surprisingly he has been a constant no-show in recent past and has frustrated fans on several occasion by ignoring the match situation in trying to bat himself in. India’s reluctance of dealing firmly with fading stars puts inexperienced selection panel in a bit of a quandary. As IPL and other tournaments showed, there are potentially 2-3 very strong wicket-keeping candidates available should Team Management desire them. The entire Indian cricket fraternity worships Dhoni and you can be assured the wise old wizard will retire on his own terms. 6th Bowling Options When fully fit, India is fortunate to have 5 genuine wicket-taking options but there will be times when 1 or 2 of these bowlers will have an off day and a 6th option will come in handy. Suresh Raina is the only certified pie-chucker in the side but India can use someone who is a bit more reliable with the ball as a 6th bowling option. Krunal Pandya offers that option to India but it’s hard to see conservative Indian panel considering someone like Krunal Pandya to fill this important role. Backup Bowling Options The current backup options haven’t been that impressive. I can’t imagine the Kauls, the Sirajs, the Thakurs, and the Unadkats of winning games on their own. Agreed, they have been up against brutal batting orders on very flat pitches but none of them has demonstrated that X-factor that bowlers need in this era of flat pitches, mighty bats and smaller grounds. Umesh Yadav bowled some vicious spells in IPL but lacks that consistency. Shami has fitness and personal issues to deal with. Varun Aaron is not even on selector’s radar. Under present system, Mavi, Nagarkoti, Khalil and Rajpoot will probably have to put on impressive performances for 12-18 months to get a look in. Conclusion The purpose of this article is not to paint an overly negative or depressing picture of the current state. Like India, all other teams are also facing their own unique set of challenges. England lacks world class bowlers and will be under massive pressure to #BringItHome. Australia has serious re-building to do after Sandpapergate disaster. RSA is dealing with ABD’s retirement and the return of Amla to a more mortal form. NZ is like Belgium (Football Team) of cricket. A guaranteed semi-final pick but lack that firepower to go all the way. Pakistan and WI possess several match winners but do blow hot and cold. Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have serious issues of their own. Here is hoping team management and selectors are paying attention to few of these issues and ensuring India goes well-prepared into the mighty important tournament.
  2. 6 points
    Asim

    ICF through its 10 Years

    2006 2007 2010 2012 2014 2016
  3. 4 points
    I remember the year 1989 very well. Gavaskar had retired a couple of years earlier and Kapil had lost pace. We were losing to Pakistan more often than not in ODIs. The 1983 World Cup and 1985 Benson & Hedges Cup twin wins were things of the past. Crickets fans were feeling directionless. Then came the tour to Pakistan , where a baby-faced 16 year old stole the hearts of the entire nation with his brave batting against the Pakistani quicks. Watching cricket was a pleasure once again for Indians ... and this euphoria lasted for more than fifteen years. In the 1990s, when Tendulkar batted, the whole nation " batted " through him. In 1991, a tall, thin guy, with flailing arms while bowling , burst onto the scene and bowled really quick ... and India had its first genuine fast bowler, Srinath. The year 1996 saw an elegant left-hander score a century on test debut at Lords. This was followed by another century in the next test match. While this was happening, another young man with impeccable technique missed his centuries by a few runs in both those tests. Indian cricket fans were brimming with excitement once again at the emergence of these twin gems. Be it a wristy Hyderabadi scoring 3 centuries in his first three tests in 1984-85, a bespectacled Kumble taking a 4-fer in in Sharjah in 1991, Zaheer and Yuvraj sparkling in Nairobi in 2000, a dashing Sehwag scoring 105 in South Africa on test debut in 2001 ... these memories will stay with us for ever. More than these moments and memories, every time a special talent emerged, it gave us reasons to watch cricket for the next few years. No one will forget the dabaang innings of 148, that a long-haired keeper-batsman played in 2005 against Pakistan ... and a new star was born. No matter what one feels today, every Indian cricket fan felt a connection with that young man, which would stay with us till the time he won us the 2011 World Cup as captain. Then came Kohli, who would go on to become one of the biggest superstars. entertaining us in all three formats with his spectacular batsmanship. Rohit, Rahane, Pujara, Dhawan, Ashwin, Jadeja, Shami, Umesh, Bumrah, Bhuvi etc. ... all of them inspired interest among certain sections of fans. Seeing a young Shami debut, combining genuine pace with reverse swing to floor the West Indians in 2013, was very exciting. Fast bowling fans just loved it when young Umesh Yadav and Varun Aaron bowled at 150 kph. Sports survive and grow in stature and popularity because of superstars and stars. Thirty-one years have passed but people still talk about and remember Maradona winning the football world cup. Fans need to find a connection with individual players. They are happy when that person does well and sad when he fails. They realize their own sporting dreams through him or her. Cricket is facing competition from other sports in India like never before and needs star players more than ever. In Indian cricket, we are recently seeing a trend of trying to introduce thirty-plus players as a matter of priority, especially the batters and keepers . Youngsters are getting chances but only when an " elderly " is not good enough or is injured or fails the yo-yo test or rotation policy demands more players. If the current ODI batting line-up makes it to the 2019 World Cup then we will have six batters who are 30+. Dhoni 38, Karthick 34, Jadhav 34, Dhawan 33, Rohit 32, Kohli 30. I am not suggesting that thirty plus players should all be be dropped or not given fresh chances. But, there should be a mix of experience and youth. Too many youngsters mean lack of experience and too many older players mean lack of new direction and dwindling fan interest. Moreover, there is no point in promoting mediocrity when it comes to selecting fresh players. We have seen young spinners and all-rounders being introduced and backed though ... and the result is there for all to see. Be it the wrist-spin twins, Kuldeep and Chahal, or the charismatic all-rounder Hardik Pandya, they have given new direction and new energy to our team. I hope that some talented youngsters are allowed to flourish in the batting, keeping and fast-bowling departments too. If they receive the same backing as the young spinners and all-rounders are getting, they will also do well . KL Rahul, Shreyas Iyer, Rishabh Pant, Prithvi Shaw, Vijay Shankar, Karun Nair, Md. Siraj, Basil Thampi, Avesh Khan, Kamlesh Nagarkoti etc. etc. are waiting. It never was and and never is about choosing the top performers in domestic cricket or the well known names. It is always about spotting and backing the players who have the potential to achieve something extra at international level from now on.
  4. 3 points
    Indian fast bowler, Md. Shami, was on fire during the closing stages of the Johannesburg test match in January 2018. As quick yorkers and stump directed deliveries came spearing in one after another, the South Africans were losing wickets fast and crashing to a test defeat on their home turf. And we won rather quickly after this. This test match win was rather unique ... India won it without playing a single spinner while playing 4 specialist fast bowlers and a seamer-allrounder ... for the first time in our history. And what an elated feeling it was for the fast bowling fans of India ! Forty years back, the only way to differentiate between an Indian pacer and an Indian spinner was to look at the length of their run-ups. After that, we produced one good test quality pacer per decade ... Kapil in the 1980s starting 1978, Srinath in the 1990s and Zaheer in the 2000s. The 2010s decade saw a sea change. With much improved strength and endurance training, nutrition, world class facilities and fitness coaches at the NCA, rampant use of speed-guns in coaching facilities, good cricket infrastructure in many parts of India, bubbling confidence of Indians due to a fast growing economy, rookie pacers interacting with world class coaches and players in the IPL, good U19 and A-team structure etc. ... fast bowling culture finally arrived in India. And in 2018, we have so many good quality genuine fast bowlers right from the U16 stage to the senior team. Now, the 5 test series in England is about to be played. Let us take a look at the resources available to us. Pacers selected in the squad to England for the first 3 tests -- Jasprit Bumrah Age 24 Test Average 25.2 and SR 48.1 Speed range in test matches - 135 k to 148 k Bowling style - Right arm fast Bumrah is a hit-the-deck genuine fast bowler who is around 6 feet tall. He has a high arm and unorthodox action. Gets good bounce , zip off the deck and seam movement wherever possible and is a very accurate bowler. He started off as a pacer who bowled indippers most of the time ... but in the last 9 months he has also developed the delivery that moves away slightly. This has made him a very dangerous bowler. He is a thinking bowler who adapts to situations fast and is a quick learner. This, along with his ability to combine pace and bounce with skills, has made him a genuine wicket taker. He bowled with great intensity and pace in his debut test series in South Africa and ended up with 14 wickets from 3 tests ... and his transition from white ball to red ball cricket was rather smooth. His unfortunate thumb injury will make him miss the first test. I hope he gets fit for the second game. He has all the qualities to be the leader of our pace attack. Md. Shami Age 28 Test average 28.9 and SR 51.2 Speed range in test matches - 135 k to 147 k Bowling style - Right arm fast He is a short, well built, genuine fast bowler who combines pace and bounce with good skills and has an excellent ball release and seam position. He is a master of reverse swing both ways and gets consistent seam movement too wherever available. Although not a classical swing bowler, he can bowl conventionally swinging balls when conditions are helpful ... and takes the ball away from the right-handeres. He also has a vicious and skiddy bouncer which he uses liberally. Shami in full flow is a sight to behold and this has made him a low average and low SR bowler. But his career has been marred by knee injuries which has made him miss many a series. Adding to his injury woes has been some acute marital problems in the last 8 months, which has shaken him mentally. I hope he is in the mental frame of mind to give his one hundred percent in the upcoming test series. If he is firing on all cylinders, our job will become much easier in England. Umesh Yadav Age 30 Test average 34.9 and SR 58.0 Speed range in test matches - 135 k to 150 k ( but has bowled 130 k to 145 k in the last few months ) Bowling style - Right arm fast He is a skiddy fast bowler, around 5'11" , who can combine pace with outswing. But his weaknesses are lack of consistency, accuracy and insufficient bounce for such a quick bowler. He has a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde syndrome. We dont know which Umesh we are going to get, the magical wicket-taker or the club level bowler. Another problem he has developed in the last few months is bowling slower than he can. This is not a good idea for anybody, but especially for someone whose USP is pace. He has done it perhaps in search of accuracy. That hasn't happened though as most pacers are most accurate when they are bowling in full rhythm and normal pace. Bowling slower or faster than usual, both affect accuracy adversely. If he can combine outswing, pace and good lines ... he can be a handful in England. Ishant Sharma Age 29 Test average 35.5 and SR 65.9 Speed range in test matches - 132 k to 145 k Bowling style - Right arm fast-medium He is a 6'5" hit the deck pacer who has been around for more than 10 years. A slow learner and sub-par performer, he is lucky to have survived this long. But, in the last 4 years he has added value, in overseas test matches, as a workhorse pacer who can get in a lot of overs at a low economy rate while hitting the deck hard and maintaining lively pace. He has recently had a county stint and seems to have developed a better inswinger. His perennial problem has been bowling a bit shorter than ideal length and we will see whether this aspect has improved. Shardul Thakur Age 26 Test average - Yet to debut Speed range in FC matches - 130 k to 142 k Bowling style - Right arm fast-medium A short skiddy pacer, around 5'9" ... he seems to be the automatic backup seamer in all formats the moment someone is injured or rested. But is definitely not the best choice available, with so much good quality fast bowling talent available in India now. He is primarily an outswing bowler. If he can bowl a good line and length then he can be successful in England due to his ability to get outswing. He has a decent bouncer too. We have to see whether he can sustain pace in test matches. He is such a short seamer bowling at standard pace, whether he can make an impact, if the dry English summer does not offer much swing, needs to be seen too. Pacers who barely missed out due to injury or otherwise -- Bhuvneshwar Kumar ( injured ) Age 28 Test average 26.1 and SR 53.1 Speed range in test matches - 127 k to 142 k Bowling style - Right arm fast-medium India's best swing bowler who is capable of picking regular five-fors in helpful conditions or on greentops. His unavailability in swing-friendly England, atleast for the first 3 tests, is a big blow for us. He has a good seam position and can swing the ball both ways if conditions favour conventional swing, get some seam movement on greentops and is an accurate and thinking bowler. He often looks innocuous on flat or slow tracks though. After adding some pace and bounce, Bhuvi has become very competitive in test matches. He will be missed. Md. Siraj Age 24 Test average - Yet to debut Speed range - Was Bowling 135 k to 150 k in T20s ... Can he bowl 135 k to 145 k in tests ? Bowling style - Right arm fast-medium / fast A wiry, skiddy fast bowler, around 6'1", Siraj has progressed very fast after FC debut, with stellar FC, List A and A-team performances. He can bowl with genuine pace but does not always do so. His speed has improved a lot in the last 4 months. He started off as a bowler who bowled indippers mostly, but saw him bowling the away going delivery rather regularly on the just finished A-team tour to England. Previosly, most of his wickets were via skiddy quick stump directed deliveries, which fetches him lots of bowled and LBWs. He has been getting quite a few caught behinds in recent times. He has been in red hot form in the just concluded 4 day A-team series. Has picked up 15 wickets in 2 matches. Should have been picked in the test squad. Ankit Rajpoot Age 24 Test average - Yet to debut Speed range in FC matches - 130 k to 143 k Bowling style - Right arm fast-medium He is a very tall outswing bowler, around 6'3" maybe, who bowls at a lively pace. Can hit the deck hard when needed, for bounce and seam movement. Bowls a beautiful line and length too. Could have been an ideal pick for England but got injured just before the test squad was announced. He has been playing FC for a long time and has done well in both FC and on A-tours. His issues can be ... he is sometimes unable to maintain pace and intensity in 4-day matches. Navdeep Saini Age 25 Test average - Yet to debut Speed range in FC - 133 k to 145 k Bowling style - Right arm fast A skiddy fast bowler, around 6'0", he bowls a wonderful line targeting the top of off stump. He can seam the ball both ways. He bowled at high pace and with good intensity in the knock-out matches of last year's Ranji Trophy and picked up lots of wickets including fifers. He has been playing for India-A for 2 seasons now and was picked in our Test squad in the one off test versus Afghanistan. Conclusion -- If we had our 3 low-average and low-strike-rate pacers available for this test series ... Bumrah, Shami and Bhuvneshwar ... then our pace attack would have posed a tough challenge for England. Unfortunately, Bhuvi is injured and Bumrah will miss the first test atleast. This situation makes our pace attack hit or miss for the first test ... and it is time our 3 senior pacers, Shami, Ishant and Umesh, put their hands up and show some consistency and intensity. Things should improve if Bumrah is fit from the second test match onwards.
  5. 2 points
    India - 107/10 (35.2 overs) After an exciting 1st test, all eyes were on Lords when these two top teams locked horns again. But the fun was spoiled by persistent rain on 1st day when the game got called off. Joe Root for England won the toss on 2nd day and asked India to bat in most hostile rainy overcast conditions. The duke ball swung throughout the day and Indian batsmen looked clueless against some top bowling. India made two changes which were along the expected lines. Shikar Dhawan and Umesh Yadav were dropped for Cheteshwar Pujara and an additional spinner in the form of Kuldeep Yadav. However, changing the opening combination made no difference as India were found themselves reeling with 2 wickets down with only 10 runs on board. It looked like all on King Kohli's shoulder again and he needed to carry the batting line up. A bizarre run out of Pujara just before the rain break piled on to the misery of Indians. Pujara Run Out - the turning point After almost 3 hours rain break, the game resumed around 5pm local time and big partnership was needed between skipper Kohli and Vice Captain Rahane. Kohli's constant struggle against Woakes finally came to an end when he edged one to the slips for 23. He never looked comfortable against Woakes who drew him forward in the previous over with lots of plays and misses. Once the Indian captain gone, it went all downhill from there. Only Ashwin showed some resistance with a well made 29 and few late blows from Shami ensured India went passed 100 mark. India finally got all out for 107 with lots of questions to answer. Anderson 5 wicket haul With only 107 runs in 1st innings, it is very tough for India to come back into this match. However with rain forecast for whole day tomorrow and monday, there is a chance this game might be washed out and India might sneak with a draw.
  6. 2 points
    The one-sided beat-down handed to SL by India and the passionate words of Andrew Fernando here, here, and here, shed some light on the current state of SL cricket. Question is, where do they go from here? How do they get more competitive? Do they? Given the unprecedented level of churn and chaos that cricket is undergoing right now, Franchise T20 cricket is forcing a re-drawing of international calendars, as well as forcing cricket boards to drastically change how their domestic cricket is structured, played, coached and governed. Sri Lankan Cricket will not have a popularity problem with the sport, unlike say England, Aus, NZ, SA. But they are almost destined to have a funding and talent issue, given their population base. It is no surprise that they have firmly allied themselves to the BCCI - its given them a funding lifeline without which things would have been even worse. Based on Fernando's reporting, it appears that the lifeline may have been wasted to some extent by profligate and corrupt administrators. A situation that's as sad as it is predictable. The question is, what can SL cricket do to stay competitive at the international level? Cricket as we know it is changing. And changing rapidly. All countries and boards need to keep up with the modernization that has entered the game in this post-T20 world. Top teams need top dollars in order to compete with the best in the world, and they need to create and/or strengthen their domestic cricket structures to ensure that they have a steady pipeline of skilled players coming through. Boards need to work to provide their younger and developing players with platforms where they get to train and compete with and against the best possible circumstances - whether that's first-class cricket or Franchise T20 cricket. Opportunities to 'develop' prospects apprenticing in international cricket over bilateral series will continue to shrink. I believe the answer is to double-down on its alliance with the BCCI. The time has come for a Columbo Franchise to join an expanded IPL. SLC already tried their hand at getting their own little franchise tournament going. It died as soon as the Indian money stopped flowing through the "Champions League" tap. They don't have the population numbers that the Bangladesh or Pakistan have to sustain their own league. Nor do they have deep pocketed fans who can make up the paucity in numbers that Australia or England do. Their best bet at acquiring and maintaining access for their unfinished talent to top-level franchise cricket is to partner with the BCCI, and a deep-pocketed Indian investor - let them get a piece of the profits, while extending the IPL's 7 domestic player rule to Sri Lankans for the Colombo Franchise. This will create a self-funded pipeline and finishing school for Sri Lanka's younger cricketers. 7 Sri Lankans starting for an IPL team, means a dozen or so Sri Lankans are guaranteed roster spots in the top T20 league in the world. Apart from the established stars that win contracts for the other teams. If they don't do this, the only Sri Lankans who will get a chance to participate in these overseas leagues will be the ones that are already on their way to international star status. There are 2 immediate obstacles that stand in the way of this hypothetical scenario. First, This requires a bold and visionary attitude from SL cricket administrators, one that will set aside short-sighted provincial and nationalistic attitudes to recognize the long-term benefits to SL cricket. And second, it requires equally visionary and pro-active leadership on the Indian side - both within the "non-profit" quasi-governmental BCCI, as well as the private IPL Council. From a BCCI perspective, adding the Colombo Islanders and the Dubai Stallions to the IPL makes complete financial and strategic sense. You enhance and extend the IPL's pole position as the planet's leading cricket T20 league, expand your playing calendar, increase your fan-base, your profits, and gain/strengthen long-term allies at the ICC voting table in the process. Geographic proximity and existing cricket infrastructure means the logistical challenges are minimal. There is ample precedent for this - Look at the most successful sports leagues in the world, and you'll see that the best ones already span national borders - whether its the NBA or MLB in America, for example. The NFL - widely considered to be the most profitable sports league in the US, is working hard to expand beyond its American footprint, and is investing heavily in building a platform that will ultimately lead to creating a Franchise in London. The NBA has been quietly doing the spade work to lay the foundation for spreading its reach into emerging markets like China and India. Unlike the NFL, The IPL doesn't even need to do the hard yards. All it needs to do, is say yes.
  7. 2 points
    New guy

    Project Rohit Sharma

    The untold story of BCCI's top secret project to rule the world Many people today are baffled by the affinity shown by BCCI, the captain, the coach, ex players, current players and many others seemingly sane people, towards Rohit Sharma. Those in the know reveal this exclusive, never told before story BCCI's goal plans Phase 1 - Include Rohit Sharma in the team Phase 2 - ????? Phase 3 - Profit!!!! So why is Rohit Sharma included in the team? Here are some reasons experts tell us 1) Rohit Sharma is like the chaff air-force planes deployed during world war 2 to distract heat seeking missiles from other planes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaff_(countermeasure) So while the opposition is baffled and focused on Sharma(he seems useless but is selected every time, why? There is some secret, some strategy, we need to find out. Let focus on Rohit Sharma) , other batsmen like Rahane can slip through the radar. The opposition thinks Sharma might be important and targets him and neglects other batsmen 2) Rohit Sharma is the next level evolution of a "batsman" Cricket has often been called the "batsman's game". And modern cricket is even more so. So what did scientists do to counter this dis-balance? They genetically engineered the batsmen who always loses to bowlers. It doesn't matter what kind of bowler it is. Pace bowlers. Swing bowlers. China-man. Part time bowlers. This batsman is designed to fail. To prevent bowlers from going extinct, scientists have designed the batsman who boosts bowler's confidence 3) Rohit Sharma is the "Judas goat" of batsmen who leads other FTB batsmen to their doom A judas goat is basically a trained goat (or other animal) which will lead the hunter to other members of his species. So the other animals get killed and the judas goat is rewarded. Rohit Sharma is the epitome and the prototype of the FTB who fails everywhere. So any batsman who follows him or bats like him can be identified and immediately terminated 4) Rohit Sharma is a trained commando on the field to protect other players This is self explanatory. Rohit Sharma is obviously not a cricket player. Then why is he on the field? Well considering that India is the richest cricketing country and the super star cricketers always a target of criminals or terrorists, we need extra protection for all the players. What better protection than a super commando, disguised as a player, who is on the field at all times? Rohit Sharma might not score many runs, but if any terrorist attempts to harm any player on the field, he can take them out with his bare hands 5) Rohit Sharma is an advertisement come to life This is the most likely explanation according to experts. Big companies first advertised on the radio. Then they advertised with flyers. Then they advertised on bill boards. Then they moved to TV. They finally created an artificial life which can go on the field and pretend to be a player. So Rohit Sharma is just an AI actor who needs to be on the field at all times displaying sponsor logos. He is just like the advertisement logos you see on the ground after each over They started with this And have now gone on to this Has technology and advertisement gone too far? Can ad-blocks block Rohit Sharma from showing up on my TV? Will more genuine players be replaced by walking advertisements? Only time will tell!
  8. 1 point
    Will start with Careers that are over and ill be highly shocked if they comeback now 1. Raina- Said during IPL the way he was handling fast bowling he shud not play for India anymore , but i thought ENG -IReland doesnt have bowlers to trouble to my surprise IReland bounced him out n england spun him out. To comeback for any player its important how he does in domestic n most importantly how badly others fails to. Raina might do well in domestic but their is enough talent now to keep him away 2. Parthiv - When u drop someone its important to check has he improved n then pick him n with parthiv n even Raina selectors shud realise they didnt so what did they check??? Parthiv in SA showed that he still was an Awfull keeper. With karthik, Saha , pant, kishen, samson....... we dnt have to see him Again Now the careers who are on thin ice For them what matters if they perform they keep their place, if they dnt they are on thin ICE and if others perform aiming for same role.....they can be shown the door 1. Dhoni- Many may think he will never be dropped but no one is indispensable . The more ur perfomance goes down the more nearer u get towards getting dropped. Some one will get extra rope and some wont but that rope will end one day. Dhoni batting isnt helping him but his contribution to captaincy, fitness, wicket keeping n helping younger players is saving him. He is a large figure in Indian cricket so for him to be dropped now Karthik n pant has to perform. If karthik has a gr8 england tour ....dhoni place will be in bother and then possible he might be a series away from being dropped. Same is with Pant he has to perform whenever he gets a chance and he is an impact player.....but for him to secure that place he has to show gr8 consistency. So as of now m expecting karthik to be more of problem for dhoni then Pant. 2. Murali Vijay- I have no doubt in my mind if vijay fails england tour .....we ll see the last of him. He hasnt had gr8 last 1-2 yrs and his age wnt help him either. With the emergance of Shaw n mayank .....i doubt selectors will back him if he fails in England . 3. Dinesh Karthik- A bad series in england n it can be curtains for him. DK for all his inconsistency will always be under microscope. A failure with gloves will keep him on benches as then he ll have to compete with other batsman for the role of only batsman. If he fails with both bat n gloves .....we might not see him again for which also Pant has to perform. If pant doesnt perform n so does DK fail, DK might still live on for a series or two. Now the career which still has oxygen left in them and wud only be under threat if they do badly in england but just under threat 1. Dhawan the test cricketer- he aint going anywere 2. Ishant sharma- All he has to do is bowl that one gr8 spell n he ll be their to play his 100 test, leave ur hopes he aint going anywhere till aussie tour ends. Yes a failure on both tour will lead him to be dropped . 3. Pujara- A failure in england wud only mean he might be only seen in subcontinent where his place cnt be questioned but cnt say with kohli. 4. Shami- Same as Ishant sharma. Need atleast 2 bad tours 5. Ashwin- Will have the same fate as pujara if he fails actually a lil better as his batting might come to rescue him. 6. Jadeja- If kuldeep does well he might have to compete with ashwin in future for 2nd spinner spot overseas. At home his place cnt be questioned.
  9. 1 point
    In contrast to the recent flow of things for this mighty Indian LOI team, they faced a decent-sized defeat at the hands of the three lions. Not only did this result spill life into the series and saved the 3rd ODI from becoming a dead contest, It was a vital speed-breaker that was necessary for India when looking at the larger picture i.e the upcoming WC. Morgan, to the joy of his counterpart, decided to bat first after winning the coin toss. The stats and team form showed that batting second was the key and the factors that led England to decide otherwise remain unclear. Perhaps, as Gambhir pointed out, it might have something to do with negating the effectiveness of the Indian spin-duo under the lights. The 1st Innings The first 15 overs or so went as per the script. The English openers got them off to a great start, like they always do. Kuldeep came in and picked up his customary set of wickets. What changed, to the relief of the English fans, was the sight of their main ace Root back to what he does best. A well compiled century while not only making sure that he held the fort against the Indian spinners but also scoring at a decent pace. Buttler fell early and Moeen wasn't any good either. the Indian bowlers were keeping things nice and clean until David Willy decided to go bonkers and gave England what they required to get to 320, which was just about at par given the conditions. The 2nd Innings Dhawan gave the innings a great start unleashing a set of exquisite cover drives. The Hitman, on the other end, took his own sweet time. Rahul fell cheap and India's innings was already in trouble. Kohli-Raina stitched together decent partnership but the RRR was always climbing and their pace would only mean one thing-pressure on the weakest part of this Indian team, the lower middle order. Dhoni again gave a masterclass on why he is a misfit at no.6 but Kohli easily brushed away this fact in the post-match press conference with an often used brush called 'off-day'. Once Raina was out in the 32nd Over, there was but little hope. India succumbed to a 86 run defeat. Not a lot of takeaways from this game for Team India. Only a couple of questions that Kohli and Shastri will have to find answers to. The series is now up for grabs and hopefully, India can pull it off and take a load of confidence going into the all-important test series. Sourab10Forever
  10. 1 point
    A day after England’s loss to Croatia in the FIFA World Cup 2018 semifinals, a cricket match between two strongest ODI teams wasn’t expected to the hit headlines, but fireworks were always on cards given both teams have very explosive batting lineups. The match was played on the same ground where England had scored the highest ever ODI score three weeks ago. Indian captain Virat Kohli won the toss and elected to chase on what looked like great batting conditions. England started quickly as usual and absence of two front line bowlers - Bhuvneshwar Kumar and Jasprit Bumrah, meant that Indians didn’t find it easy to stop openers Roy and Bairstow. They were off to a flyer in powerplays before Kohli threw the ball to chinaman Kuldeep who has been in great form on this tour. An ill-fated reverse sweep by Jason Roy in 11th over started the downfall of the England team after that great start. Root looked absolutely clueless when he was caught plumb in next over of Kuldeep and a good review against Bairstow for what initially looked like ball pitching outside leg meant India had clamped down chances of a big score. England needed to rebuild after 3 quick losses, however captain Morgan couldn’t check his temptation to play a big shot against Chahal, only to be caught by Raina at midwicket. Kohli removed Kuldeep from attack after a 4 over spell allowing English batsmen Stokes and Buttler to rebuild innings. Together they added 93 runs. Buttler continued his great form and was fluent throughout his innings scoring at more than run a ball. Stokes, on the other hand, was scratchy and found it difficult to get going against all bowlers. Bringing back Kuldeep brought quick rewards for Indian teams as he dismissed Buttler to a faint edge down the leg in 39th over. England 214-5 by 44th over were hoping for Stokes and Ali get them close to 280 in 50 overs. However, Stokes who had been patient for longer earlier inexplicably decided to go after Kuldeep’s last over only to see his reverse sweep caught inside the circle. Wiley fell in the same over giving 6th wicket to Kuldeep - best haul for a spinner in England. Pacers failed to create much impact in good batting conditions and England were dismissed for 268 which didn’t look like a challenging score for a good chasing team at any point. Rohit and Dhawan started quickly before Dhawan fell to Moeen Ali as he tried to go after him. Once Kohli was at the crease, chase always looked in control complemented by Rohit’s unnatural attacking batting early in the inning. Sharma displayed a wide range of shots to completely annihilate the weak English bowling. He brought his 100 in just 82 balls and won the game for India in the 41st over after Kohli’s dismissal earlier. It was an easy win for the Indian team, but Kuldeep was easily the biggest difference between two sides who are occupying top 2 places in the ICC ODI rankings. If England has to compete with this in-form Indian team, they have to quickly find ways to tackle Indian wrist spinners who seem to be on a different zone with their accuracy, guile, flight, pace and skills on display. English bowling will be tested again and if they have to improve their 2019 world cup preparations, they need to seriously look into this department.
  11. 1 point
    Overall figures Decade Teams Mat Won Lost Tied Draw W/L Ave RPO Inns HS LS 1870s 2 3 3 3 0 0 1.000 18.71 2.47 12 261 104 1880s 3 29 25 25 0 4 1.000 19.38 2.30 105 551 42 1900s 3 41 31 31 0 10 1.000 25.08 2.82 155 577 36 1890s 3 32 26 26 0 6 1.000 25.25 2.63 118 586 30 1910s 3 29 25 25 0 4 1.000 27.55 3.01 104 589 58 1950s 7 164 113 113 0 51 1.000 28.60 2.30 591 790 26 1990s 9 347 223 223 0 124 1.000 31.64 2.86 1244 952 46 1960s 7 186 97 97 1 88 1.000 32.27 2.49 690 656 78 1980s 7 266 143 143 1 122 1.000 32.64 2.86 935 708 53 1930s 6 89 53 53 0 36 1.000 32.69 2.71 314 903 36 1970s 7 198 114 114 0 84 1.000 32.80 2.69 729 687 42 1920s 4 51 35 35 0 16 1.000 33.42 2.66 180 636 30 2010s 10 350 275 275 0 75 1.000 33.53 3.22 1302 759 45 2000s 11 464 350 350 0 114 1.000 34.17 3.20 1686 765 47 1940s 6 45 23 23 0 22 1.000 35.77 2.62 160 674 42 Phase 1: Test batting till 1910s was underdeveloped and cricket was too much in favor of batsmen. So, 1870s to 1910s have lowest averages, but batting was consistently improving. Phase 2: Batting improved a lot in Bradman era (1920s-1940s) and this was batsmen dominated phase. Phase 3: 1950s. Pace bowling started developing from trundlers to faster bowlers and batsmen struggled to manage them. Averages dropped quite significantly with improved quality of bowling on uncovered pitches. Phase 4: 1960s. Covered pitches came into picture and bowlers had no clue to what to do. Batsmen made merry and it was much better decade of batsmen than previous one. Phase 5: 1970s-1980s. Balanced time for batsmen and bowlers. Batting averages went up and pacers found their way to get wickets. Phase 6: 1990s. Toughest era for batting with all teams having good bowlers and batsmen struggling. Batting averages dropped significantly. Averaging 50 became almost impossible. Phase 7: 2003-2013. Era of FTBs. Many great bowlers retired. Pitch quality improved a lot and we got flat pitches all over the world. Minnows entered the scene with lot of matches. Top 6 team averaged 37 with bat. Great ones averaged above 55 and there were million batsmen averaging 50+. Steyn was only great fast bowler emerging during this phase. Massive FTBs and minnow bashing era. Phase 8: Post 2013. Teams becoming desperate for home advantage and started preparing spicy pitches everywhere. Bangladesh improved at home and Zimbabwe rarely got matches, so that minnow factor dimnished. So many new pacers and spinners emerging again. Overall batting average since 2013 - 33.10. The way it's decreasing with year, it is easily toughest phase in 1990s. Year Teams Mat Won Lost Tied Draw W/L Ave RPO Inns HS LS year 2014 10 41 33 33 0 8 1.000 35.96 3.27 156 730 94 year 2016 10 47 40 40 0 7 1.000 33.47 3.24 171 759 83 year 2015 9 43 34 34 0 9 1.000 32.81 3.32 160 628 60 year 2013 10 44 33 33 0 11 1.000 32.17 3.13 164 638 45 year 2017 10 47 40 40 0 7 1.000 32.06 3.20 174 687 68 year 2018 4 4 4 4 0 0 1.000 25.96 2.98 15 649 130
  12. 1 point
    Development of Pandya as a cricketer has been a delight to watch.In many ways this guy has completed our side in almost all formats.Hitting ability aside ,the matirity and calmness he has shown in last 6 months exemplifies his development. Much of Pandya's growth as a cricketer must be attributed to Dhoni at start and largely to Kohli for always backing him in every situation.There were times I thought him playing as a 3rd seamer is a slightly risky option but he has seldom disappointed with the ball in the hand.Going into the champions trophy final I thought he might be the weak link in the bowling but he turned out to be one of the best bowler on the finals day.Subsequently he has taken crucial wickets and now hardly can be treated as a weak link as I presumed he was in this side.Inclusion of variations like knuckle ball is a pleasant sight as well. Batting has been a revelation.I remember I was not convinced that much after his 50 odd vs Eng at Eden Gardens in January this year , the innings was riddled with edgy shots.But 6-8 months after that,Pandya looks much more calmer, equally destructive against spinners or seamers but he does all that with a plan in mind.Never have I seen a batsman who finds hitting sixes against spinners as easy as this guy and even yesterday when Agar was bowling I knew chakka tou padega hi isko kabhi na kabhi and Pandya didnt disappoint.Now the growth part ,when he miscued one on a flighted loopy delivery, he knew he had committed a mistake and it was great to watch he didnt repeat it and on the contrary changed his modus operandi and hit Agar for a six using his feet.Maturity,calmness and game awareness everything was on display. Now coming on to the nub of the point I am trying to make,looking at Pandya grow as a cricketer in this regime, a thought came in my mind that Rishabh Pant who I believe is an equally big talent,should be given a chance to become a polished cricketer like Pandya is on course to becoming.As I wrote earlier,Pandya has completed our side in many ways already but if Pant is a given a chance to become a player he has the potential to become ,our limited overs team can be the most dangerous side in the current circuit.We have one maverick in Pandya and there is still scope for one more in our side and Pant is ideal for that. Now comes some people's apprehension that Pant can only play if Dhoni hangs up his keeping gloves.I dont believe that, Dhoni and Pant both can play,like Healy n Gilly circa 1997.The world cup is still 2 years away and I am desperately hoping Pant is in Kohl's scheme of thing for that tournament because such a talent has to be tapped.
  13. 1 point
    Shreyas Iyer. Sanju Samson. Rishabh Pant. Karun Nair. Sarfraz Khan. And the latest addition to the mix, chota packet promising to be the next big dhamaka - Prithvi Shaw. All of these guys seem to have that 'it' factor when it comes to their batting. That certain something that jumps out when you watch them bat - plenty of timing, a plethora of strokes, and a willingness to take the attack to the bowlers. But take a bit of a closer look, and you can start to see telltale signs of inconsistency - a tendency to "live hard or die trying". Given the way the economic and 'popularity' incentives are stacked in favor of "modern" bats who are capable of exciting stroke-play, its not hard to see why the teenyboppers of Indian batting are all out to emulate the ABDVs and Rohit Sharmas of the world, as opposed to the Gavaskars and dare I say, even the great Sachin Tendulkar. Gone are the days where the domestic circuit prioritized, taught and honed the ability of a young batsman's ability to put a premium price on his wicket. These days, all you hear in terms of "cutting edge conventional wisdom" is the tiresome cliche of "expressing yourself" and "playing your natural game". So widespread is the epidemic in India's young ranks,, that even the normally reticent Rahul Dravid felt compelled to publicly call out some of his wards. An annoyed Dravid was quoted as dismissing all this emphasis on "natural game" as "frustrating". Dravid chose to make his point with an unusually strong choice of words. Strong words they might be, but I feel that it will be inevitably swamped by the tsunami of $$$$ that has flooded cricket since the inception of the IPL. After all, what will a young Indian cricketer aspire to be, considering the cricket circuit today - Why should he devote his energies to building his skills like say, a Murali Vijay, Che Pujara, or even an Ajinkya Rahane? When a test cricket 'failure' like Rohit Sharma is a multi-millionaire superstar IPL team captain, and gets to be a glory hogging ODI opener for the national team because of his ability to hit sixes? To some extent, this evolution of incentives and the corresponding evolution in batting is not restricted to India alone. One look at the young batsmen coming through the ranks in England and Australia will show you a markedly 'same-ness' in the ranks. James Vince. Marcus Stoinis. Chris Lynn. Glenn Maxwell. I wonder where the next Rahul Dravid will come from. Or if he will show up at all. Cricket will be poorer for it, if he doesn't.
  14. 1 point
    SK_IH

    The no.4 conundrum

    No.4 is a pivotal role in ODI lineup,sort of a mid runner in a relay race who takes the baton from the top 3 and passes the baton to so called finishers(i hate this term) to finish the game.In some ways no.4 has to be a player with a finisher mentality himself but he has to be well versed in playing dual role of consolidating and finishing. Yuvi played the role of no.4 really well for half decade circa 2005-2011 but post that no number 4 has been able to establish himself.Though Pandya batted at no.4 in last 2 ODIs but in the current set up there are lots of players who are vying for that no.4 slot: Hardik Pandya : He has done a great job in last 2 odis. In the modern ODI setup he seems an ideal no.4 to me as he has shown the ability to take singles according to situation and sixes against spinners are never far away.That he isnt a slogger has been on display in the last 6 months or so and to me he has certainly fortified his credentials to be a regular no.4.But I believe if he is to be the regular no.4,there has to be inclusion of one more more power player in the lineup. Manish Pandey : His demotion in the last 2 odis must have given him signals that the team management has not been impressed with him.But Pandey to me is someone who needs to time to build up his innings and I dont think he is someone who can be very successful in lower order.He plays all his cricket for KKR at top order and thats where he has been successful as well.So, he is another one who at the moment is playing at a position where he is being disadvantaged and he has himself to blame for that as he failed continuously against NZ last year and then in the 1st ODIs this series.But personally I believe he is someone who needs to be backed,that innings at Sydney always come to mind where he played an ideal innings for a big chase. Jadhav : Very good player,always likes to aggressive ,sometimes unnecessarily aggressive.What I observed even yesterday about him,he has these pet shots which he plays whether its cut or sweep.I was very disappointed the way he played against Zampa , he got into bad positions and was premeditating too much.Not one of the top contenders for me for sure. Dhoni: The favorite of many on this forum.He is someone who in many fans thinking is the ideal no.4 at the present with the way he bats these days.The way he takes his own sweet time before getting into groove.Somehow I believe he is good at the position he has scored runs at no.5 recently ,though I was hoping he is sent earlier than when he came in because I wanted to see how he reacts to the situation,his modus operandi etc.There were many who believed he would have taken RRR quite up and made the situation even more difficult.Sadly,even though am his fan I agree with the said notion,because we can only presume what he would have done and too much tuk tuking is exactly what he has done in recent past when there has been a huge target to chase.But even if he is given a chance at no.4 ,its not a bad option to try but he needs to be tested in situation like there was one yesterday. KL Rahul: Only few bright minds in the team management think Rahul can be a no.4/middle order option,.I ll only hope,this guy's career is not ruined in the process. Then ,we can throw in a curve ball in Krunal Pandya: I truly believe this guy is a very good batsman,who can play according to situation,street smart and also has the ability to play big shots when needed.Last year I believe he was playing at no.3 for Baroda,which clearly shows he is primarily batsman,who has the ability to build up an innings. The batting order should be set, keeping in mind that when the situation of 60 runs of 36 balls comes,there should be a player left who is adept at taking side home from that situation.Exhausting all players capable of playing at good pace is also not a bright idea.
  15. 1 point
    How successful has Amir been when compared to his hype many years ago? Hype based on one sole season in England? Amir had one amazing season no doubt, but he is not the first one to do great on swinging English pitches, players like RP Singh did the same Amir was always treated as a special, special talent and he did show great glimpses of it. Even in the T20 Asia cup, we saw what he could do on swinging pitches. PCB went out of the way to help him after the spot fixing scandal, tried to rehabilitate him, brought him back immediately to the national team. He always gets the new ball and is the leader of Pak pace attack Do the numbers match up to the hype? Lets take a look Amir's average currently stands at 32.49. Since his comeback, he has been averaging 38.26 Country played against, Amir averages over 35 against every single country except England (27.67) and Australia (32.3) The Australia average includes 2 matches played in the same English conditions where he averaged 22.2. In Australia he averages over 40 Career summary Grouping Span Mat Runs HS Bat Av 100 Wkts BBI Bowl Av 5 Ct St Ave Diff v Australia 2009-2016 6 171 48 19.00 0 24 5/79 32.33 1 0 0 -13.33 v England 2010-2016 8 174 39* 14.50 0 31 6/84 27.67 2 0 0 -13.17 v New Zealand 2009-2016 5 115 26 11.50 0 14 3/43 36.14 0 0 0 -24.64 v Sri Lanka 2009-2009 3 37 22* 12.33 0 6 3/38 43.50 0 0 0 -31.16 v West Indies 2016-2016 2 29 20 9.66 0 6 3/63 38.50 0 1 0 -28.83 Amir has played in Australia, New Zealand, England, UAE and Sri Lanka. He averages over 35 in each of those countries except England and averages over 40 in both Australia and Sri Lanka while averaging over 38 in UAE in Australia 2009-2016 4 147 48 24.50 0 13 5/79 40.84 1 0 0 -16.34 in England 2010-2016 10 198 39* 13.20 0 42 6/84 26.26 2 0 0 -13.06 in New Zealand 2009-2016 5 115 26 11.50 0 14 3/43 36.14 0 0 0 -24.64 in Sri Lanka 2009-2009 3 37 22* 12.33 0 6 3/38 43.50 0 0 0 -31.16 in U.A.E. 2016-2016 2 29 20 9.66 0 6 3/63 38.50 0 1 0 -28.83 Year wise, even before his ban, Amir averaged 41 in 7 matches in 2009. 2010 is the only year he excelled because of one English season in amazing swinging conditions. Here is the season wise average breakup 2009 season - average 43.5 2009/10 season - average 41.9 2010 season - average 19.8 2016 season - average 42.4 2016/17 season - average 35.5 The 2010 season average seems more and more like an anomaly as time goes by. I think he still looks impressive and beats the bat. But most of his effectiveness comes from the new ball swing. His yorker and short ball seems non-existent and he has lost his in-dipper. He clocks some speed on the speed gun yet looks innocuous. Even the excuse of the 5 year delay doesn't seem to hold water considering his record before his ban outside of England. Do remember that in the period since his comeback he has played in some helpful pitches in England and New Zealand too. How long will talent give him a free pass considering PCB fought tooth and nail to get him back in the team? Seeing Pakistan's seam bowling options I am sure Amir might still be best for the team. However, those who saw a promising fast bowler emerge and were following his progress with interest might be disappointed with his performance so far.
  16. 1 point
    1. To fit Pandya in 11- We all want Pandya to play as we have high hopes on him. But in current scenario where our main bowlers are rested we can't play him as 5th bowler. I don't think so Pandya at this stage can give you 10 overs every match as a bowler and none of the top batsman bowl. Raina is out and Mandeep and Jadhav don't bowl as well. So basically if we play Pandya, we are risking the 5th bowler. Pandya as 5th bowler becomes more risky as our best bowlers like Shami, Ashwin, Jadeja, Bhuvi all are rested and there is huge inexperience in bowling lineup. So if anyone of main bowler have an off day and Pandya can't give us 10 over well well we are really going to struggle . 2. Raina at 6 wasn't good either in case of collapse- Another thing what worries with the idea what if top order collapses . Well when did Raina bailed us out of collapse , hardly very few instances. So even in case of collapse what better Raina would do than Pandya. 3. Responsibility makes u grow- Batting Panyda at 6 will give him more balls and responsibility to put a price on wkt. Best way to improve batting is to bat up the order. Even in case of Jadeja n Raina i always believed their batting regressed coz of batting at that spot. Pandya did show he can put a price on his wicket in Australia A tour . 4. Dew and inexperienced bowling lineup - Most matches are in north in winter so there would be dew for sure and we have extremely inexperienced bowling lineup so a 6th bowler is must in such scenario. In case of dew the spinners are almost out of the game. 5. Adding Jadhav would solve no purpose- We already have Mishra and Bumrah who are liabilities in field and minus 2 assets like Jadeja and Raina in field . That bowling lineup needs to to be backed by fielding so Adding pandya to field makes more sense than Jadhav. Also do we see Jadhav playing in 2019,well no way. These days we can't have so many liabilities in field. 6. Pandya, Axar, Yadav, Mishra- well the tail doesn't look that week, all these guys can bat and certainly all can make 50s for sure. 7. Pandya being looked on as test all rounder- well if we are looking to make Pandya as test all rounder and make him bat at 6, well we have to trust him at 6 in ODIs to then.

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