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Found 7 results

  1. https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/28159133/george-bailey-round-australia-selection-panel As usual, Australia setting the benchmark for innovative thinking and continuous improvement. Bailey last played a T20I in 2017, is still playing domestic, and now will be one of 3 selectors, especially chosen for his short-format expertise. In india, we are still reluctant to try split captaincy despite massive increase in player workload, and our LOI selections are stale, as selectors are usually players who retired 15-20 years back. Most people in administration are busy fighting turf battles & power games. Either BCCI looks to totally squash player voices, or we have Dhoni/Kohli type periods where one or two players have outsized influence. When was the last time a poor series or tournament performance triggered a rational system-wide introspection like Argus review. Not every plan or program will work, and no team can remain No. 1 indefinitely, but the drive to improve the system and become a benchmark for the rest of the world in all areas related to cricket is missing. A country of our size and passion for cricket needs to develop this attitude at all levels of our cricketing structure. Hoping that Ganguly-Dravid combo now involved at top echelon of cricket admin, with backing of political strongmen like Shah & Thakur can effect such changes.
  2. Who has got out side chance to get selected for the world cup squad
  3. Who has got outside chance to get selected for world cup
  4. It was the pace of Ishant Sharma’s walk that convinced Jason Gillespie that things were clicking for the Indian bowler at Yorkshire. Ishant had this habit of dawdling slowly back to the top of his run up after he had finished bowling a ball. “Sometimes he would stand there and stare if a decision hasn’t gone his way or he wasn’t happy with the delivery or whatever. He would slowly trudge back. It wasn’t ideal. So I would keep telling him to show some urgency. When he started to do it – that was the turning point for me, not any particular spell in a match,” Gillespie says. The former Aussie pacer goes on the explain, “I would keep telling him to show urgency. In county cricket, you had to bowl 96 overs in a day. So first of all, I had to sort it out in that respect. Secondly, it meant he wasn’t wasting his time thinking about irrelevant stuff. “Get back to the top of the run up. Take a breath. Think what I am looking to achieve with this ball. What would allow me to bowl that particular delivery. Just crack on after that. And Ishant would run in and do that. No trudging, no drifting mentally, just crack on and bowl. It was good to see that he took it on board early and it showed me he cared.” The most important factor in Ishant’s success in this series is the lengths he has pinged: much fuller than his usual self. It was an angst with the 90’s generation with the other tall Indian bowler Javagal Srinath. ‘If only he would pitch it up,’ was the perennial prayer in his early years. The same with Ishant. For 11 years now. “It was clear what Ishant needed to do. Sometimes, he can bowl a little bit short and little wide and not test the batsmen’s front foot defence. The length was I think due to bowling a lot in Indian conditions. Even when you are trying to hit the top of the off stump in India, you can hit a back of length because of the (lack of) bounce. The key to bowling in the UK is the length. You have to challenge the stumps. That was what we worked. He needed to get the ball fuller, inviting the batsman to play off the front foot. And get them thinking about looking towards a positive stroke on the front foot. You are then bringing in all sorts of dismissals.” The two would sit at the balcony of the pavilion at the cricket ground in Brighton Hove and have chats over cups of coffee. “I was impressed with his work ethic and attitude. He would ask a lot of questions and was very open to listening and taking in feedback.” Ishant also enjoyed the anonymity that the small town of Hove provided him. He would go for walks and to cafes, and he was in good space mentally. He went to the Royal Brighton, with its Indian style minarets and domes, where Indian soldiers are commemorated for fighting for the British empire in the first world war. Ishant also worked on getting control over the ball that holds its line outside off. “We worked on his seam and wrist position at release. The aim was not to get this ball swing in. Have an upright seam and we talked about adjustments needed and how to keep the wrists and fingers in a particular way. We also talked about how he could use the crease better – create different angles to keep the batsmen guessing.” Over the years, Ishant has often tried getting his lengths right but something has clicked on this tour more than other time. Gillespie reckons Ishant is finally focussing on his strengths, and is keeping things really simple. “I would say he is now playing to his strengths. Sometimes you end up trying too much. He has cut out all that. He now runs in to bowl, thinking about his strengths. That’s the difference really.”
  5. Who do you think should be dropped from the playing XI for the second Test? I say drop Murali Vijay and Rohit Sharma for Prithvi Shaw and Hanuma Vihari.
  6. India play their first T20I at the Gabba on November 21, after which the series moves on to Melbourne and Sydney. Then comes a four-Test series before the tour finally winds down with three ODIs starting January 12.
  7. http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/23620449/spot-fixing-allegations-made-one australia-test-ca-requests-evidence Cricket Australia has requested TV channel Al Jazeera for raw footage and un-edited material to determine whether allegations of spot-fixing in a Test involving Australia in India are credible and an investigation is necessary. The allegations were made by the Al Jazeera TV channel in a documentary, seen by ESPNcricinfo, which focuses on various forms of corruption in the sport. Another Test involving a different country is also under the scanner. CA responded to the claims by saying "neither the ICC or Cricket Australia is aware of any credible evidence linking Australian players to corruption in the game." The board said it has not yet had the opportunity to view the documentary or raw footage containing the allegations, and requested Al Jazeera for the same. The ICC is aware of an investigation into corruption in cricket by a news organisation and as you would expect we will take the contents of the programme and any allegations it may make very seriously. "We have already launched an investigation working with anti-corruption colleagues from Member countries based on the limited information we have received. We have made repeated requests that all evidence and supporting materials relating to corruption in cricket is released immediately to enable us to undertake a full and comprehensive investigation. The match in question in the Al Jazeera documentary is the Australia-India Test in Ranchi in March 2017. The allegations are that during a certain period of the game some Australian batsmen scored at a rate specified by fixers for the purposes of betting, which is illegal in India. In the documentary, a person Al Jazeera identified as Aneel Munawar, an Indian national who is said to work for crime syndicate D Company, is seen naming two Australian players to the undercover reporter as being part of the fix. The names of the cricketers were edited out in the documentary but Al Jazeera said it would pass on information to the relevant authorities. The channel said the two Australians named by Munawar had not responded to the allegations. Al Jazeera, however, claimed that the information passed by Munawar to the undercover reporter about run-scoring in a certain passage of play was accurate in the Test. The instruction, the channel said, was for the batsmen to score slowly so that the actual runs scored would be lower than what the illegal betting market was placing bets on. The channel said there was no evidence to indicate any other Australia players had been involved or aware of the alleged plot. "Together with the ICC, we are aware of the investigation by Al Jazeera into alleged corruption in cricket," CA chief executive James Sutherland said in a statement. "Although not having been provided an opportunity to view the documentary or any raw footage, our long-standing position on these matters is that credible claims will be treated very seriously and fully investigated. "Cricket Australia will continue to fully co-operate with the ICC Anti-Corruption Unit in its review of the matter. Neither the ICC or Cricket Australia is aware of any credible evidence linking Australian players to corruption in the game. Cricket Australia and the ICC take a zero-tolerance approach against anyone trying to compromise the integrity of the game. "We urge Al Jazeera to provide all un-edited materials and any other evidence to the ICC investigation team, so, if appropriate, a full and thorough investigation can be conducted."
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