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coffee_rules

Dravida bug spreading in Bengaluru

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13 minutes ago, Norman said:

 

Those are not called punugulu here. We call them ponganaalu. Made with the same batter as Dosa and shallow fried. 

 

Punugulu are deep fried. :drool:

 

 

 

Not this one. We are talking about those that are made with a special pan and use Dosa batter as is..

 

61S-pjXS2QL._AC_SX679_.jpg

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19 hours ago, maniac said:

Bahut se hai. Dekh jo tera expectation hai woh to tere mooh pe thookenge bhi nahi.

 

bhaak yaha se. Anonymously har koi john abraham hai jise Deepika chahiye (ye le tera lead) 

Dude, parents taught you manners or not? I asked politely, you came up with an uncivilized reply. You come across as a fool that still staunchly believes in preserving their so called culture/identity. 

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15 minutes ago, coffee_rules said:

Not this one. We are talking about those that are made with a special pan and use Dosa batter as is..

 

61S-pjXS2QL._AC_SX679_.jpg

 

Yes that's what I said. These are called ponganalu or ponkanalu (with the special pan). 

 

Punugulu are ones that are deep fried as you can see above. 

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13 minutes ago, WC2011INDIA said:

Dude, parents taught you manners or not? I asked politely, you came up with an uncivilized reply. You come across as a fool that still staunchly believes in preserving their so called culture/identity. 

I gave a reply that question deserves lol. You thought asking for  a bride on an unrelated topic was funny, intelligent or profound ? If you can’t handle it then don’t act smart.

 

Anyways I may say a lot of dumb stuff too you can hold me to it then.

 

No hard feelings chill.

Edited by maniac

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19 minutes ago, maniac said:

I gave a reply that question deserves lol. You thought asking for  a bride on an unrelated topic was funny, intelligent or profound ? If you can’t handle it then don’t act smart.

 

Anyways I may say a lot of dumb stuff too you can hold me to it then.

 

No hard feelings chill.

I thought you behaved like that only with rasgulla. Problems at work? :laugh:

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1 minute ago, Real McCoy said:

I thought you behaved like that only with rasgulla. Problems at work? :laugh:

One of those cranky moments lol. I probably mixed him up with an other troll but still in the context I stick with the reply, maybe I could have been less crude.

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22 minutes ago, Norman said:

 

Yes that's what I said. These are called ponganalu or ponkanalu (with the special pan). 

 

Punugulu are ones that are deep fried as you can see above. 

Basically one is steamed the other one is deep fried. We have the same thing. We also have a sweet dish that just looks like that I believe that is also fried. We call it sweet paniyaram

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7 hours ago, coffee_rules said:

What is idiotic about them to motivate you to learn the local language. It is because of this  Urbans attitude that some innocent poor Tamils or poor Northies on the street get thrashed in public  in Bengaluru

See I dont have an issue with encouraging outsiders to learn the local language , but there is a certain way to do it . . 

People who settle down in Bangalore for good and start identifying themselves as Bangalorean's will eventually learn Kannada , there is no need to force the rest . Whats the necessity for some one whos going to be in the city for 1-5 years to learn a new language ? 

 

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6 hours ago, maniac said:

Not a fan

I am not saying you will still like it , but the neer dosa you get in restaurants is crap . The home made ones are a lot more thinner , the batter is actually like water . its extremely difficult to make , my mum throws it in a angle in one swift action and am not exaggerating I may have had 50-70 dosas on some days . 

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15 minutes ago, jusarrived said:

See I dont have an issue with encouraging outsiders to learn the local language , but there is a certain way to do it . . 

People who settle down in Bangalore for good and start identifying themselves as Bangalorean's will eventually learn Kannada , there is no need to force the rest . Whats the necessity for some one whos going to be in the city for 1-5 years to learn a new language ? 

 

Ok, fair enough. Sorry, I thought you were refering to these people who were asking people to speak in Kannada as idiots as the protesters. I don't think situation is so grave that we need to get on to the street to protest. It can be resolved via petitions/PILs/Communication. Instead, these rowdies are let loose to destruct property.  I don't see learning a new language even we are staying for just 5 yeats, is a big burden. Sometimes, you will have to , out of necessity to deal with local folk/govt/school etc. But, to each his own. I have seen people living all their lives in Bangalore, not learning a word of local lang/culture. That is a frog in a well.

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7 hours ago, coffee_rules said:

This was the post that hijacked the thread into a south food war

Food war is at least a legitimate issue :phehe:. So many scoundrels in this thread trying to make false claims.

 

Besides, most of us are in consensus that Hindi should neither be antagonized nor forcefully enforced on non-native speakers.

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4 hours ago, jusarrived said:

I am not saying you will still like it , but the neer dosa you get in restaurants is crap . The home made ones are a lot more thinner , the batter is actually like water . its extremely difficult to make , my mum throws it in a angle in one swift action and am not exaggerating I may have had 50-70 dosas on some days . 

you are one lucky dude for having a mom who makes 70 dosas ( roughly an hour of preparation )   ... :hatsoff:to your mom

 

I agree neer dosa in restaurants is crap... 

 

 

 

 

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21 minutes ago, Gollum said:

I don't understand why some posters here always resort to personal abuses. Spoils the mood, no provocation, hardly ever post here but when they do just bile directed towards others. God knows what they are gaining!!!

Almost makes it not worth spending time here to listen to such casteist slurs. This is not the first time he is abusing. Because he plays chess good or thinks entitled goes around throwing personal abuses like that . I can pay back very much dearly, but it spoils the mood of the forum. Just a facking idiot, that’s all. I think the #1 rule in ICF should be to ban casteist slurs

Edited by coffee_rules

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10 hours ago, coffee_rules said:

For the uninitiated, ‘mindri’ in Kannada slang is a paramour. You can normalize such casteist slurs from this gentleman here.  Dravida is a Sanskrit word that means a peninsula. Karnataka is no Dravida Nadu, it has coast on only one side

South India is a peninsula as a whole. None of the states are in themselves of course. Absurd. No one really cares if someone calls them Dravidian etc. It’s just sectarian in an already sectarian society 

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10 hours ago, Gollum said:

I don't understand why some posters here always resort to personal abuses. Spoils the mood, no provocation, hardly ever post here but when they do just bile directed towards others. God knows what they are gaining!!!

What happened this thread was chill..when I last saw it I came here for food updates lol

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5 minutes ago, Gollum said:

Maniac tagged Lanni, Lanni used some casteist slurs/abuses against coffee for no reason, that post is deleted. 

Thanks @jalebi_bhai as diga says , a ban was not needed. I will ignore him from now

Edited by coffee_rules

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56 minutes ago, diga said:

^ deleting his post would have been enough.. not ban him from posting during the IPL season

Yeah. Also we don't want to curtail the freedom of speech even if it doesn't appeal to us. Lanni may have used bad words (I have no idea of what was said) but if so, deleting would suffice and maybe a warning will be better. I don't want this site to go down the route that youtube has taken. After youtube, facebook, amazon and other conglomerates started their war on hate speech and cyber bullying, certain videos, articles and books are no longer seen on the internet and google is using seo to push dissenting comments down in their list or banning them altogether.

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38 minutes ago, Gollum said:

Maniac tagged Lanni, Lanni used some casteist slurs/abuses against coffee for no reason, that post is deleted. 

I like Lanni actually. It’s just that he hates a lot more things than I do but we do bond on Some common hatred :)

 

Yes didn’t appreciate the casteist slur on Coffee bhai though.

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I just don't get the 'casteist slur' thing - growing up in Bombay in the 80s and 90s, nobody gave AF whether you were gujju, tamil, marathi or whatever.  Forget caste, region and language didnt really matter.  Is it really that provincial and small-minded elsewhere?  I do notice a bit of bias in my cousins who grew up in gujarat, from whom I will hear occasional  'jokes' that I don't quite understand about their colleague or friends' last name, along the lines of - you wont understand he is a xyz, thats how they are. 

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Just now, sandeep said:

I just don't get the 'casteist slur' thing - growing up in Bombay in the 80s and 90s, nobody gave AF whether you were gujju, tamil, marathi or whatever.  Forget caste, region and language didnt really matter.  Is it really that provincial and small-minded elsewhere?  I do notice a bit of bias in my cousins who grew up in gujarat, from whom I will hear occasional  'jokes' that I don't quite understand about their colleague or friends' last name, along the lines of - you wont understand he is a xyz, thats how they are. 

You probably lived in a bio secure bubble way before it was a thing.

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23 minutes ago, sandeep said:

I just don't get the 'casteist slur' thing - growing up in Bombay in the 80s and 90s, nobody gave AF whether you were gujju, tamil, marathi or whatever.  Forget caste, region and language didnt really matter.  Is it really that provincial and small-minded elsewhere?  I do notice a bit of bias in my cousins who grew up in gujarat, from whom I will hear occasional  'jokes' that I don't quite understand about their colleague or friends' last name, along the lines of - you wont understand he is a xyz, thats how they are. 

Maybe you don't understand because thats how they are :phehe: But seriously, growing up in a city is different from a small town or village. different communities in the village get their reputations based on what the stereotype is which is an amalgamation of their experiences with that caste. There is no political correctness there and they form opinions just by their castes even if said individual doesn't represent the stereotypical view of their castes. That is the negative point whereas the positive is there is good cohesion among their castes. Only if that can be extended to cohesion with their compatriots this can be solved. This doesnt mean forced mixing among the castes. Creating inter-dependencies can be a good option.

One of my best friends is a son of a recently migrated telugu family from across the state border. He has told me stories from his ancestral village that his far off relatives there consider Chennai telugus as a lower class even though they are related. They were talking in telugu about how these people are low class in front of my friend who knows telugu. He told them that he knows telugu and then they shut up with uncomfortable smiles. I grew up in Chennai and casteist treatment is frowned upon. One of the benefits of the dravidian movement (if you can call it that) is that asking someone's caste is often a taboo.

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3 minutes ago, Real McCoy said:

One of the benefits of the dravidian movement (if you can call it that) is that asking someone's caste is often a taboo.

It is taboo in all places even without that sectarian movement. Most of the casteism or casteist atrocities are perpetuaed by OBCs over SC/STs. Vokkaligas and Kurbus have separate electorate. They vote mainly among caste lines in south Karnataka. 

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3 minutes ago, coffee_rules said:

It is taboo in all places even without that sectarian movement. Most of the casteism or casteist atrocities are perpetuaed by OBCs over SC/STs. Vokkaligas and Kurbus have separate electorate. They vote mainly among caste lines in south Karnataka. 

This I believe is a recent phenomenon. We are actually going down as a species. Our politicians have understood that divide and conquer is the best form to keep themselves in power. They have learnt well from the British. THey even go to UK and US to get their degrees and awards and strange as it may seem the west may still have control over our country.

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57 minutes ago, velu said:

 

one and only thing that matters for gujjus and marwaris is :money: 

Not all gujjus are bij-ness wallah moneybags - there are those who put stock in education and white collar salaried employment as well.  But you will rarely find a gujju who gets overly worked up about negative stereotypes hurled at him - probably because most have the confidence and sense of security that comes from relative socio-economic stability.  And unsurprisingly, those that lack that security are often seen at the forefront of prejudiced discussions.  

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3 minutes ago, sandeep said:

Not all gujjus are bij-ness wallah moneybags - there are those who put stock in education and white collar salaried employment as well.  But you will rarely find a gujju who gets overly worked up about negative stereotypes hurled at him - probably because most have the confidence and sense of security that comes from relative socio-economic stability.  And unsurprisingly, those that lack that security are often seen at the forefront of prejudiced discussions.  

His idea of gujjus is that they lie on beds of :money:and the streets in ahmedabad are paved with gold :laugh:

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1 hour ago, maniac said:

You probably lived in a bio secure bubble way before it was a thing.

I think growing up in a diverse environment makes a difference.  If there are folks and kids from a dozen different regional backgrounds, it simply pushes you to open your mind, and you adapt to that.  Kids don't do political correctness, and on the playground, its what you do, how you interact with others, and how well you can play, that is currency.  Not what your name is, or where your parents came from.  Of course jokes about ethnicities are freely deployed by kids as well, but there isn't malice in them - at that age at least.  And even for parents, when your own children have close friends from different backgrounds, it will loosen you up.  

 

I'll be honest - even after decades of living in the US, I still have a sense of otherness about non-Indians - regardless of race, white, black whatever. But after my daughter was born, we are close to another family who have a girl born a week or so later, and holding their daughter, and her younger baby brother in your hands, you just bond differently, and it has an impact on your long-held beliefs and behavior patterns.  Your stereotype software essentially gets a bit of a reset.  

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13 minutes ago, sandeep said:

Not all gujjus are bij-ness wallah moneybags - there are those who put stock in education and white collar salaried employment as well.  But you will rarely find a gujju who gets overly worked up about negative stereotypes hurled at him - probably because most have the confidence and sense of security that comes from relative socio-economic stability.  And unsurprisingly, those that lack that security are often seen at the forefront of prejudiced discussions.  

That security comes from a very strong community relations. They (business community) back each others financially and that gives them a sense of security. It is lacking among others. Probably Aggarwals have a similar system of community finance systems. Agree, a close friend of mine here in NJ, is a Patel, double grad, dad is a farmer, Even he dad is here now, working for a pharma co and they are very highly practicing Hindus. An inspiration for others to follow. Respect that community a lot. 

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20 minutes ago, sandeep said:

I think growing up in a diverse environment makes a difference.  If there are folks and kids from a dozen different regional backgrounds, it simply pushes you to open your mind, and you adapt to that.  Kids don't do political correctness, and on the playground, its what you do, how you interact with others, and how well you can play, that is currency.  Not what your name is, or where your parents came from.  Of course jokes about ethnicities are freely deployed by kids as well, but there isn't malice in them - at that age at least.  And even for parents, when your own children have close friends from different backgrounds, it will loosen you up.  

 

I'll be honest - even after decades of living in the US, I still have a sense of otherness about non-Indians - regardless of race, white, black whatever. But after my daughter was born, we are close to another family who have a girl born a week or so later, and holding their daughter, and her younger baby brother in your hands, you just bond differently, and it has an impact on your long-held beliefs and behavior patterns.  Your stereotype software essentially gets a bit of a reset.  

There is always a balance right.

 

In a village for example people might call each other with casteist or religious slurs but without malice and they are ok with that.

 

In a multicultural society like Mumbai or USA, you might be talking to guy whose thinking a racist thing possibly  about you but just to comply with the social norms is making conversation.

 

We are humans we all have bias, it’s the malice and disdain that concerns me.

 

For example you are a South Indian or You are a Gujju, how dare you look,act,behave differently kind of malice. That’s a problem and I feel that’s a lot more in multi cultural societies than say a rural area.

Edited by maniac

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16 minutes ago, maniac said:

For example you are a South Indian or You are a Gujju, how dare you look,act,behave differently kind of malice. That’s a problem and I feel that’s a lot more in multi cultural societies than say a rural area.

But that's my point - growing up, or living in a more multi-cultural environment, gives you a lot of chances and a 'push' to be more accepting, or at least 'tolerant' of looking/acting differently.  Now regardless of location, some assholes will remain just that, so its not like it will be 100% effective.  But we are talking generally.  

 

What you are referring to, is a different issue - the fact that overt intolerance and prejudice is less acceptable in urban "PC" settings, and prejudiced folks have simply trained themselves to veil their true sensibilities.  Even assuming that this is the case, which it probably is, in many cases - I view that as a relative success, because by 'de-normalizing' bigotry, you force even prejudiced folks to alter their behavior, at least in public.  

 

And as an aside, this is why a lot of folks who are perceived as "overly PC" or 'liberal' take exception to allowing 'hate speech'.  Because if you stay quiet and accept such prejudice, it runs the risk of being 'normalized' and only feeds on itself more and more.  Mainstreaming of prejudice and bigotry, is an outcome that none of us should want.  Whether its related to caste, religion, language, or race. 

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32 minutes ago, coffee_rules said:

That security comes from a very strong community relations. They (business community) back each others financially and that gives them a sense of security. It is lacking among others. Probably Aggarwals have a similar system of community finance systems. Agree, a close friend of mine here in NJ, is a Patel, double grad, dad is a farmer, Even he dad is here now, working for a pharma co and they are very highly practicing Hindus. An inspiration for others to follow. Respect that community a lot. 

Even amongst gujjus the Patels are looked at as example of high cohesion when it comes to family, clan, and 'native village'.  Especially the Patels that have made it in "phoren" lands.

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30 minutes ago, maniac said:

For example you are a South Indian or You are a Gujju, how dare you look,act,behave differently kind of malice. That’s a problem and I feel that’s a lot more in multi cultural societies than say a rural area.

Do you live in CA. I have heard from a friend in CA who said that in CA, whites only employ whites, and the same is the case with Blacks, Mexicans, Asians, Indians. They live in a "multicultural" city, are cordial to each other but they all stick to their people. This was strange to me. I have lived in Texas most of the time I spent in US and never got the feeling. I hung out with whites, mexicans and on the rare occasion a few blacks during school and work and we went to restaurants and bars together. Maybe when the minority reaches a critical mass, people get angsty with one another and tend to form groups

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Casteism is more or less absent in Bengal. Thanks to decades of social reform, even heavyweights like Vivekananda and Ramakrishna Mission devoted a lot of time/energy for the same. And Bengali reformers spread this message to all corners of the country. Swami Vivekananda called Malabar a lunatic's asylum cos of the rigid, oppressive caste structure, much to the annoyance of his hosts. He directed his pupils to stay back and reform the society there LINK. Vidyasagar dropped his caste surname, worked for education (esp women's) irrespective of caste, in fact he did more for the lower castes to correct historical wrongs. For instance his Sanskrit College was targeted towards sudras, as principal he enforced revolutionary changes in the education field (like opening up 100s of printing shops and with help of donations distributed free learning material for first time learners in rural areas). Not many may know this but he reformed the Bengali alphabet/type and simplified the grammar since disadvantaged sections were finding it tough to learn. He basically made the language accessible to the common man, the Bengali we use today is his legacy. Great life, great accomplishments even if you leave aside the unorthodox topic of widow remarriage where he defeated 1500 scholars in debate, single-handedly just with his mother's blessings by his side, ultimate badassery which liberated so many suffering Hindu widows. Many other names, truly Bengal Renaissance is so underrated when we talk about development of idea of modern India. So many social ills removed, such large scale reform, big role in our struggle for independence. 

 

Coming back to topic, later the commies too took the spirit forward, didn't do caste politics for elections, created an environment where caste wasn't a factor in social issues. Though what they did with religion is another matter. Long story short, caste ain't a thing in Bengal. Renaissance deserves credit but so does the Left Front govt. And yeah Bengal rocks. 

Edited by Gollum

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