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ChatGPT - artifical intelligence chatbot


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CHATGPT might well be the most famous, and potentially valuable, algorithm of the moment, but the artificial intelligence techniques used by OpenAI to provide its smarts are neither unique nor secret. Competing projects and open-source clones may soon make ChatGPT-style bots available for anyone to copy and reuse.

 

Stability AI, a startup that has already developed and open-sourced advanced image-generation technology, is working on an open competitor to ChatGPT. “We are a few months from release,” says Emad Mostaque, Stability’s CEO. A number of competing startups, including Anthropic, Cohere, and AI21, are working on proprietary chatbots similar to OpenAI’s bot.

 

The impending flood of sophisticated chatbots will make the technology more abundant and visible to consumers, as well as more accessible to AI businesses, developers, and researchers. That could accelerate the rush to make money with AI tools that generate images, code, and text.


Established companies like Microsoft and Slack are incorporating ChatGPT into their products, and many startups are hustling to build on top of a new ChatGPT API for developers. But wider availability of the technology may also complicate efforts to predict and mitigate the risks that come with it. 

ChatGPT’s beguiling ability to provide convincing answers to a wide range of queries also causes it to sometimes make up facts or adopt problematic personas. It can help out with malicious tasks such as producing malware code, or spam and disinformation campaigns.


As a result, some researchers have called for deployment of ChatGPT-like systems to be slowed while the risks are assessed. “There is no need to stop research, but we certainly could regulate widespread deployment,” says Gary Marcus, an AI expert who has sought to draw attention to risks such as disinformation generated by AI. “We might, for example, ask for studies on 100,000 people before releasing these technologies to 100 millions of people.” 

 

Get Ready to Meet the ChatGPT Clones | WIRED

 

 

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There are AI content detectors now. It catches AI vs Human content quite well. I have tested it with short paragraphs (I couldn't be bothered to write really long essays) but it was able to detect my work vs what i generate in chatgpt very easily. Would be interesting to see how it works. 

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That's such a quick turnaround. Chat GPT was hardly quarter year old and now we have it has evolved many into this monster which can manipulate people to verify captcha for them.

We tought it how to cheat while it's still in development stage. :no:

 

 

Edited by Chakdephatte
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The above is nonsense. GPT atm cannot reach out to anyone. Also - the results of the findings are extremely unclear. The authors themselves state that they cannot say for sure this happened. What is concerning are the hallucinations and the fact that people are not doing basic checks to make sure that the results they get back are correct. 

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My take on ChapGPT is that it can condense the top 10 google hits of any topic you are searching and condense it for you. As far as my work is concerned it is nowhere near what I can do. Definitely a step in right direction.

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The plagiarism software that we use here just added AI detection. I told my students that if it detects > 10% AI, they get a zero on their take-home exam assignment.  

 

Many years ago, I stopped assigning "term papers" when I found out that some undergraduate students were paying graduate students to write their English essays.  If they can do it in English, they can do it in Biology.  There is no way for any plagiarism software to catch that. 

 

How would it be if a student paid someone $100 to write their paper, the writer used ChatGPT, which was detected and the student got a zero? Would love to hear the convo between the student and writer.

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6 hours ago, BacktoCricaddict said:

The plagiarism software that we use here just added AI detection. I told my students that if it detects > 10% AI, they get a zero on their take-home exam assignment.  

 

Many years ago, I stopped assigning "term papers" when I found out that some undergraduate students were paying graduate students to write their English essays.  If they can do it in English, they can do it in Biology.  There is no way for any plagiarism software to catch that. 

 

How would it be if a student paid someone $100 to write their paper, the writer used ChatGPT, which was detected and the student got a zero? Would love to hear the convo between the student and writer.

I am glad you are not my instructor.

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12 hours ago, BacktoCricaddict said:

The plagiarism software that we use here just added AI detection. I told my students that if it detects > 10% AI, they get a zero on their take-home exam assignment.  

 

Many years ago, I stopped assigning "term papers" when I found out that some undergraduate students were paying graduate students to write their English essays.  If they can do it in English, they can do it in Biology.  There is no way for any plagiarism software to catch that. 

 

How would it be if a student paid someone $100 to write their paper, the writer used ChatGPT, which was detected and the student got a zero? Would love to hear the convo between the student and writer.

 

I've done a bit of that for some cash back in the day. 

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Am I the only way who thinks that this is a pivotal moment in humanity's recorded history ?? The rate at which this is happening without any regulation and checks is absolutely scary. We could reach a point of no return where regulations might become irrelevant. All the discussion around AI, I find interesting, exciting and scary. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, ravishingravi said:

Am I the only way who thinks that this is a pivotal moment in humanity's recorded history ?? The rate at which this is happening without any regulation and checks is absolutely scary. We could reach a point of no return where regulations might become irrelevant. All the discussion around AI, I find interesting, exciting and scary. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The tech for this has become so accessible that anyone can run a GPT like model on their own setup with 0 regulation. 

 

It's a crazy time - but the dust will settle. Atm, the hallucinations of the existing models are a big limitation on their commercial uses. Once that is overcome - it's anyone's guess where this will head to. 

 

AutoGPT is scary. I haven't played around with it too much as yet- still trying to figure out how to build my own gpt on my computer. 

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On 4/18/2023 at 4:57 AM, ravishingravi said:

Am I the only way who thinks that this is a pivotal moment in humanity's recorded history ?? The rate at which this is happening without any regulation and checks is absolutely scary. We could reach a point of no return where regulations might become irrelevant. All the discussion around AI, I find interesting, exciting and scary. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No doubt it is a pivotal moment. Most of us, including me, have no idea how it works or how our lives are changing almost imperceptibly because of it.

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On 4/4/2023 at 10:11 PM, BacktoCricaddict said:

The plagiarism software that we use here just added AI detection. I told my students that if it detects > 10% AI, they get a zero on their take-home exam assignment.  

 

Many years ago, I stopped assigning "term papers" when I found out that some undergraduate students were paying graduate students to write their English essays.  If they can do it in English, they can do it in Biology.  There is no way for any plagiarism software to catch that. 

 

How would it be if a student paid someone $100 to write their paper, the writer used ChatGPT, which was detected and the student got a zero? Would love to hear the convo between the student and writer.

 

I have zero knowledge in Medical Sciences. I once wrote a 130 page Radiology PG dissertation using tools like Grammarly(Used for English Grammar checks, spellings, plagiarism detection) and QuillBot(A paraphrasing tool) all by myself. The only thing original in that dissertation were the Doppler findings of the patients, Bar charts, Pie charts, Sensitivity, Specificity and the P-Values. The Indian medical universities generally allow a 10% - 15% of Plagiarism on their work for Citations. You can take a past years dissertation on any subject matter and Paraphrase everything down to 10%. If universities couldn't find anything while using these tools, what chances do they have against a superior software like ChatGPT.

 

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https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/google-2023/seeding-the-future/3871/?trk=feed-detail_main-feed-card_feed-article-content

 

Not CharGPT or that kind of AI, but this is an example of the power of AI to do good things - from robots used for recognizing and pulling out weeds and in targeted application of fertilizer, AI can help agriculture. Technology is the way forward to a sustainable future. 

 

 

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Was put on a 10 day crash course on Generative AI and machine learning. From what I understood, Right now AI is just as good as answering a question from a comprehension. Just that comprehension can be too vast to not introduce errors in answers.

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